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About Us
Welcome to the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision Website
Mission Statement
To work in partnership with the Department of Corrections and local supervisory authorities to protect the public and reduce the risk of repeat criminal behavior through incarceration and community supervision decisions based on applicable laws, victims' interests, public safety and recognized principles of offender behavior change.
Organization
Annual Performance Measures

 
With a total agency staff of 15 and a biennial budget of approximately $3.8 million, the Board fulfills its public-safety role in a professional and exemplary manner.  Guided by the values embodied in the Oregon Constitution, the Board works in partnership with other criminal justice agencies to protect the public and reduce the risk of repeat criminal behavior through incarceration and community supervision decisions based on applicable laws, victims’ interests, public safety, and recognized principles of offender behavioral change.
 
To learn more about the Board and its responsibilities, please explore the "Board Overview" presentation linked above, and the other information and publications on this website.
 
 
1905 Governor given power to parole prisoners. Courts given sentencing guidelines for "bench parole."
 
1911 State Parole Board established.
 
1931 "Modern Probation Act" passed. State Probation Commission established.
 
1939 "New" Board of Parole and Probation created, Director of Parole and Probation position authorized.
 
1969 Board became full-time paid agency. New members appointed.
 
1989 Board name changed to State Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision.
 
Parole abolished and sentencing guidelines enacted for felonies committed after November 1, 1989.
Programs
The Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision works in partnership with the Department of Corrections and local supervisory authorities to protect the public and reduce the risk of repeat criminal behavior.
 
The Board’s decisions are based on applicable laws, victims’ interests, public safety and the recognized principles of offender behavioral change. The Board imposes prison terms and makes release decisions on those convicted of crimes committed prior to November 1, 1989, for those sentenced for murder and aggravated murder who are eligible for parole, and for dangerous offenders regardless of crime date. The Board holds release authority over approximately 10 percent of the Department of Corrections inmate population.
 
The Board also is responsible for setting conditions of supervision for all offenders being released from Oregon prisons, imposing sanctions for violations, and determining whether discharge from supervision is compatible with public safety.  
 
The Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision is responsible for release decisions for offenders in Oregon prisons who committed their crimes prior to November 1, 1989; for aggravated murderers and murderers eligible for parole and for those convicted by the courts as dangerous offenders, regardless of crime date.
 
Board members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate to four-year terms. The Governor names the chair and vice chair. The full-time Board was authorized in 1969. The Board has statutory authority for up to five members, although only three positions have been funded since 1987.