SLIDO r2 2011 Landslide Deposits

Tags
Landslide, Oregon, GIS Database, Statewide, SLIDO

Summary
Worldwide, landslides are one of the most devastating natural, and sometimes human-induced, disasters causing billions of dollars in property damage and thousands of deaths every year (Hong and others, 2007). Landslides in the United States cause an average of 25 - 50 deaths and $1 to $2 billion in economic losses annually (Schuster and Fleming, 1986). Many parts of Oregon are highly susceptible to landslides which pose significant threats to people and infrastructure particularly in the portions of the state with moderate to steep slopes. As population growth expands and development onto landslide susceptible terrain occurs, greater losses are likely to result. Most of Oregon’s landslide damage has been associated with severe winter storms where landslide losses exceed $100 million in direct damage (such as the February 1996 event—see FEMA, 1996). However, landslides are a chronic hazard in Oregon and annual average maintenance and repair costs for landslides in Oregon are over $10 million (Wang and others, 2002). Landslides induced by earthquake shaking are likely in many parts of Oregon, and losses associated with sliding in moderate-to-large earthquakes are likely to be significant. Volcanic induced and/or associated landslide hazards are also potential threats to parts of Oregon. Some recent research at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) was performed to choose the best remote sensing dataset (i.e. aerial photos, photogrammetric elevation data, LIDAR elevation data, etc.) to use as a primary tool to begin systematic mapping of landslides in Oregon. One of the conclusions of this study was to systematically compile all previously mapped landslides from geologic and hazard maps. This database would then serve as a starting place for all future landslide studies (Burns, 2007). In order to improve our understanding of the landslide hazard in Oregon and to create a statewide base level of landslide data, this database of previously mapped landslides, the Statewide Landslide Information Database of Oregon (SLIDO) was created. The body of this report describes the methodologies used to update the database. This study was partially funded by the U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program.


Description

One of the primary chronic and most devastating geologic hazards in Oregon is landslides. Average annual repair costs for landslides in Oregon exceed $10 million and severe winter storm losses can exceed $100 million (Wang and others, 2002). As population growth continues to expand and development into increased landslide susceptible terrain occurs, greater losses are likely to result. In order to begin reducing losses from landslides, large-scale endeavors are necessary at all community levels from state government to individual family homes. One successful way to reduce losses from landslides is through pre-disaster mitigation, which can be performed at many scales from statewide to local. To begin pre-disaster mitigation of landslides, the landslide hazard must be located. Once the hazard is located the population and infrastructure vulnerable to the hazards can be identified and the risk mitigated. In order to improve our understanding of the landslide hazard in Oregon the Statewide Landslide Information Database of Oregon (SLIDO) was created. The four main objectives of this study were 1) identify previously mapped landslide deposits statewide, 2) improve the understanding of landslide hazards throughout Oregon, 3) improve the abilities of communities to begin effective landslide management and risk reduction activities, and 4) recommend future improvements and updates to the database.The goals of SLIDO Release 2 were 1) update SLIDOr1, 2) improve historically active landslide portion of the database through review of local municipality (city or county) data, 3) compile references that have detailed data on regionally significant or typical landslides, 4) add non-spatial data related to landslides such as landslide type, activity, certainty of identification, process, estimated age, etc. in specified areas, 5) populate and convene an Oregon Framework Implementation Team (FIT) landslide element subcommittee to develop standards for the statewide landslide theme. Also develop the landslide element stewardship standard.

Credits
William Burns, Ian Madin, Lina Ma, Katherine Mickelson, Evan Saint-Pierre

Access and use limitations
SLIDO was created through the compilation of the best data available. Several limitations are worth noting, and underscore that any hazard map is generally useful for regional applications but should not be used as an alternative to site-specific studies in critical areas. 1. Although it every effort was made to ensure that digitization and database entry were accurate and complete, no effort was made to verify the original data on which the compilation is based. Geologic data in the less populated eastern portions of the state were particularly limited in terms of scale, for example the 1:500,000 scale geologic map of the state was used in some locations. 2. As previously discussed, the developed database is from original sources that vary in scale, original purpose of mapping, available tools at the time of mapping, and background and interpretation by original mapper. These factors all affect the level of detail and accuracy of the landslides. 4. We neither collected, nor analyzed any new data to create this map. Therefore, this database is a snapshot view of the current data.

ArcGIS Metadata 

Resource Identification 

Citation
Title SLIDO_r2_2011_LS_Deposits


Abstract (Description)
One of the primary chronic and most devastating geologic hazards in Oregon is landslides. Average annual repair costs for landslides in Oregon exceed $10 million and severe winter storm losses can exceed $100 million (Wang and others, 2002). As population growth continues to expand and development into increased landslide susceptible terrain occurs, greater losses are likely to result. In order to begin reducing losses from landslides, large-scale endeavors are necessary at all community levels from state government to individual family homes. One successful way to reduce losses from landslides is through pre-disaster mitigation, which can be performed at many scales from statewide to local. To begin pre-disaster mitigation of landslides, the landslide hazard must be located. Once the hazard is located the population and infrastructure vulnerable to the hazards can be identified and the risk mitigated. In order to improve our understanding of the landslide hazard in Oregon the Statewide Landslide Information Database of Oregon (SLIDO) was created. The four main objectives of this study were 1) identify previously mapped landslide deposits statewide, 2) improve the understanding of landslide hazards throughout Oregon, 3) improve the abilities of communities to begin effective landslide management and risk reduction activities, and 4) recommend future improvements and updates to the database.The goals of SLIDO Release 2 were 1) update SLIDOr1, 2) improve historically active landslide portion of the database through review of local municipality (city or county) data, 3) compile references that have detailed data on regionally significant or typical landslides, 4) add non-spatial data related to landslides such as landslide type, activity, certainty of identification, process, estimated age, etc. in specified areas, 5) populate and convene an Oregon Framework Implementation Team (FIT) landslide element subcommittee to develop standards for the statewide landslide theme. Also develop the landslide element stewardship standard.
Purpose (Summary)
Worldwide, landslides are one of the most devastating natural, and sometimes human-induced, disasters causing billions of dollars in property damage and thousands of deaths every year (Hong and others, 2007).  Landslides in the United States cause an average of 25 - 50 deaths and $1 to $2 billion in economic losses annually (Schuster and Fleming, 1986).  
Many parts of Oregon are highly susceptible to landslides which pose significant threats to people and infrastructure particularly in the portions of the state with moderate to steep slopes.  As population growth expands and development onto landslide susceptible terrain occurs, greater losses are likely to result.  Most of Oregon’s landslide damage has been associated with severe winter storms where landslide losses exceed $100 million in direct damage (such as the February 1996 event—see FEMA, 1996). However, landslides are a chronic hazard in Oregon and annual average maintenance and repair costs for landslides in Oregon are over $10 million (Wang and others, 2002).  Landslides induced by earthquake shaking are likely in many parts of Oregon, and losses associated with sliding in moderate-to-large earthquakes are likely to be significant.  Volcanic induced and/or associated landslide hazards are also potential threats to parts of Oregon.
Some recent research at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) was performed to choose the best remote sensing dataset (i.e. aerial photos, photogrammetric elevation data, LIDAR elevation data, etc.) to use as a primary tool to begin systematic mapping of landslides in Oregon.  One of the conclusions of this study was to systematically compile all previously mapped landslides from geologic and hazard maps.  This database would then serve as a starting place for all future landslide studies (Burns, 2007).  
In order to improve our understanding of the landslide hazard in Oregon and to create a statewide base level of landslide data, this database of previously mapped landslides, the Statewide Landslide Information Database of Oregon (SLIDO) was created.
The body of this report describes the methodologies used to update the database.  This study was partially funded by the U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program.
Credits
William Burns, Ian Madin, Lina Ma, Katherine Mickelson, Evan Saint-Pierre

ESRI Fields and Subtypes 

FGDC Metadata 

Identification 

Citation
Citation Information
Title
SLIDO_r2_2011_LS_Deposits
Edition 2
Geospatial Data Presentation Form vector digital data
Series Information
Series Name Statewide Landslide Information Database of Oregon (SLIDO) Release 2
Issue Identification SLIDO Release 2
Other Citation Details
Publication_Information: Publication_Place: Portland, Oregon Publisher: Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries

Description
Abstract
One of the primary chronic and most devastating geologic hazards in Oregon is landslides. Average annual repair costs for landslides in Oregon exceed $10 million and severe winter storm losses can exceed $100 million (Wang and others, 2002). As population growth continues to expand and development into increased landslide susceptible terrain occurs, greater losses are likely to result. In order to begin reducing losses from landslides, large-scale endeavors are necessary at all community levels from state government to individual family homes. One successful way to reduce losses from landslides is through pre-disaster mitigation, which can be performed at many scales from statewide to local. To begin pre-disaster mitigation of landslides, the landslide hazard must be located. Once the hazard is located the population and infrastructure vulnerable to the hazards can be identified and the risk mitigated. In order to improve our understanding of the landslide hazard in Oregon the Statewide Landslide Information Database of Oregon (SLIDO) was created. The four main objectives of this study were 1) identify previously mapped landslide deposits statewide, 2) improve the understanding of landslide hazards throughout Oregon, 3) improve the abilities of communities to begin effective landslide management and risk reduction activities, and 4) recommend future improvements and updates to the database.The goals of SLIDO Release 2 were 1) update SLIDOr1, 2) improve historically active landslide portion of the database through review of local municipality (city or county) data, 3) compile references that have detailed data on regionally significant or typical landslides, 4) add non-spatial data related to landslides such as landslide type, activity, certainty of identification, process, estimated age, etc. in specified areas, 5) populate and convene an Oregon Framework Implementation Team (FIT) landslide element subcommittee to develop standards for the statewide landslide theme. Also develop the landslide element stewardship standard.
Purpose
Worldwide, landslides are one of the most devastating natural, and sometimes human-induced, disasters causing billions of dollars in property damage and thousands of deaths every year (Hong and others, 2007).  Landslides in the United States cause an average of 25 - 50 deaths and $1 to $2 billion in economic losses annually (Schuster and Fleming, 1986).  
Many parts of Oregon are highly susceptible to landslides which pose significant threats to people and infrastructure particularly in the portions of the state with moderate to steep slopes.  As population growth expands and development onto landslide susceptible terrain occurs, greater losses are likely to result.  Most of Oregon’s landslide damage has been associated with severe winter storms where landslide losses exceed $100 million in direct damage (such as the February 1996 event—see FEMA, 1996). However, landslides are a chronic hazard in Oregon and annual average maintenance and repair costs for landslides in Oregon are over $10 million (Wang and others, 2002).  Landslides induced by earthquake shaking are likely in many parts of Oregon, and losses associated with sliding in moderate-to-large earthquakes are likely to be significant.  Volcanic induced and/or associated landslide hazards are also potential threats to parts of Oregon.
Some recent research at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) was performed to choose the best remote sensing dataset (i.e. aerial photos, photogrammetric elevation data, LIDAR elevation data, etc.) to use as a primary tool to begin systematic mapping of landslides in Oregon.  One of the conclusions of this study was to systematically compile all previously mapped landslides from geologic and hazard maps.  This database would then serve as a starting place for all future landslide studies (Burns, 2007).  
In order to improve our understanding of the landslide hazard in Oregon and to create a statewide base level of landslide data, this database of previously mapped landslides, the Statewide Landslide Information Database of Oregon (SLIDO) was created.
The body of this report describes the methodologies used to update the database.  This study was partially funded by the U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Program.
Spatial Domain
Bounding Coordinates
West Bounding Coordinate -124.801602
East Bounding Coordinate -116.423637
North Bounding Coordinate 46.273977
South Bounding Coordinate 41.926119

Keywords
Theme
Theme Keyword Thesaurus None
Theme Keyword Landslide

Theme
Theme Keyword Thesaurus None
Theme Keyword Oregon

Theme
Theme Keyword Thesaurus None
Theme Keyword GIS Database

Theme
Theme Keyword Thesaurus None
Theme Keyword Statewide

Theme
Theme Keyword Thesaurus None
Theme Keyword SLIDO

Access Constraints
None
Use Constraints
SLIDO was created through the compilation of the best data available. Several limitations are worth noting, and underscore that any hazard map is generally useful for regional applications but should not be used as an alternative to site-specific studies in critical areas. 
1. Although it every effort was made to ensure that digitization and database entry were accurate and complete, no effort was made to verify the original data on which the compilation is based. Geologic data in the less populated eastern portions of the state were particularly limited in terms of scale, for example the 1:500,000 scale geologic map of the state was used in some locations.
2. As previously discussed, the developed database is from original sources that vary in scale, original purpose of mapping, available tools at the time of mapping, and background and interpretation by original mapper.  These factors all affect the level of detail and accuracy of the landslides.
4.  We neither collected, nor analyzed any new data to create this map. Therefore, this database is a snapshot view of the current data.
Point of Contact
Contact Information
Contact Organization Primary
Contact Organization Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries
Contact Person William J. Burns
Contact Position Engineering Geologist
Contact Address
Address Type Unknown
Address 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 177
City Portland
State or Province Oregon
Postal Code 97232
Country UNITED STATES

Contact Voice Telephone 971-673-1538
Contact Electronic Mail Addressbill.burns@dogami.state.or.us
Hours of Service 8:30 am to 4:30 pm PST

Data Set Credit
William Burns, Ian Madin, Lina Ma, Katherine Mickelson, Evan Saint-Pierre
Native Data Set Environment
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Version 6.1 (Build 7600) ; ESRI ArcGIS 10.0.0.2414

Spatial Data Organization 

Direct Spatial Reference Method Vector


Point and Vector Object Information
SDTS Terms Description
SDTS Point and Vector Object Type GT-polygon composed of chains
Point and Vector Object Count 22154

Spatial Reference 

Horizontal Coordinate System Definition
Planar
Map Projection
Map Projection Name Lambert Conformal Conic
Lambert Conformal Conic
Lambert Conformal Conic
Standard Parallel 43.000000
Standard Parallel 45.500000
Longitude of Central Meridian -120.500000
Latitude of Projection Origin 41.750000
False Easting 1312335.958005
False Northing 0.000000

Planar Coordinate Information
Planar Coordinate Encoding Method Coordinate Pair
Coordinate Representation
Abscissa Resolution 0.004096
Ordinate Resolution 0.004096
Planar Distance Units international feet

Geodetic Model
Horizontal Datum Name North American Datum of 1983
Ellipsoid Name Geodetic Reference System 80
Semi-major Axis 6378137.000000
Denominator of Flattening Ratio 298.257000

Entities and Attributes 

Detailed Description
Entity Type
Entity Type Label deposits

Attribute
Attribute Label FID
Attribute Definition
Internal feature number.
Attribute Definition Source ESRI
Attribute Domain Values
Unrepresentable Domain
Sequential unique whole numbers that are automatically generated.

Attribute
Attribute Label SHAPE
Attribute Definition
Feature geometry.
Attribute Definition Source ESRI
Attribute Domain Values
Unrepresentable Domain
Coordinates defining the features.

Attribute
Attribute Label UNIQUE_ID

Attribute
Attribute Label TYPE_MOVE

Attribute
Attribute Label MOVE_CLASS

Attribute
Attribute Label MOVE_CODE

Attribute
Attribute Label CONFIDENCE

Attribute
Attribute Label AGE

Attribute
Attribute Label DATE_MOVE

Attribute
Attribute Label NAME

Attribute
Attribute Label GEOL

Attribute
Attribute Label SLOPE

Attribute
Attribute Label HS_HEIGHT

Attribute
Attribute Label FAN_HEIGHT

Attribute
Attribute Label FAIL_DEPTH

Attribute
Attribute Label DEEP_SHAL

Attribute
Attribute Label HS_IS1

Attribute
Attribute Label IS1_IS2

Attribute
Attribute Label IS2_IS3

Attribute
Attribute Label IS3_IS4

Attribute
Attribute Label HD_AVE

Attribute
Attribute Label DIRECT

Attribute
Attribute Label AREA

Attribute
Attribute Label VOL

Attribute
Attribute Label QUADNAME

Attribute
Attribute Label REF_ID_COD

Attribute
Attribute Label MAP_UNIT_L

Attribute
Attribute Label Descrip

Attribute
Attribute Label SHAPE_Leng

Attribute
Attribute Label SHAPE_Area
Attribute Definition
Area of feature in internal units squared.
Attribute Definition Source ESRI
Attribute Domain Values
Unrepresentable Domain
Positive real numbers that are automatically generated.

Distribution Information 

Distributor
Contact Information
Contact Organization Primary
Contact Organization Nature of the Northwest Information Center
Contact Person Donald Haines
Contact Position Manager
Contact Address
Address Type Unknown
Address 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 177
City Portland
State or Province Oregon
Postal Code 97232
Country UNITED STATES

Contact Voice Telephone 503-872-2750
Contact Electronic Mail Addressdon.haines@dogami.state.or.us
Contact Instructions
9 am to 5 pm PST

Distribution Liability
See access and use constraints information.
Standard Order Process
Fees $25
Turnaround One week

Metadata Reference 

Metadata Date 2011-03-30
Metadata Standard Name FGDC Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata
Metadata Standard Version FGDC-STD-001-1998