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One-Thing Thursday Archive
Local Products
One thing you can do...
Consider the following at work and at home:

Purchase local chocolates this Valentine's Day.
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February 11, 2010
With Valentine's Day around the corner, no doubt chocolate is on your mind. This year, why not head to a specialty artisan chocolate store? Oregon has become renowned for its artisan chocolatiers who dip, roll and sprinkle their delicious concoctions while they employ our friends and neighbors.

December 17, 2009
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Visit a local craft bazaar this holiday season.
Holiday craft sales, art fairs and bazaars are a time-honored tradition. Churches, clubs or high schools often sponsor such events and many organizations use them as a fund-raiser. Bazaars and holiday craft sales offer yummy foodstuffs, homemade crafts, jewelry, art and photography at cut-rate prices.
 
More information:
     Craft sales and fairs 
     Bazaars 

Find your holiday tree at a local farm.
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December 10, 2009
The Pacific Northwest is a natural choice for holiday tree farming. The damp, cool winters and shorter, mild summers provide ideal growing conditions, and the region’s proximity to major thoroughfares and waterways makes transporting trees simple. There are 1,075 farms in the Pacific Northwest that range in size from five to 10,000 acres, and many are family-owned and operated.
 
The Pacific Northwest maintains its reputation as one of the country’s largest holiday tree producers and most farms observe safe, sustainable farming practices.
 
Tree farms around Salem: http://www.pickyourownchristmastree.org/ORxmassalem.php

Eat less meat
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November 12, 2009
Livestock production generates more greenhouse gases than all forms of transportation combined, including cars and airplanes. If America’s 300 million people gave up meat one day a week, it would have the same positive effect on reducing greenhouse gases as eliminating 90 million plane tickets from New York to Los Angeles.
 
If Americans gave up meat two days a week, it would have the same effect as replacing all household appliances — fridges, freezers, microwave ovens, dishwashers, washing machines and dryers — with energy-efficient appliances.
 
To keep to the definition of sustainability — simultaneously meeting environmental, economic and community needs — consider replacing these meals with other items grown by local ranchers and farmers that have diversified their production.  
 
Source: http://priceofmeat.com/2009/02/25/10-wtfs-on-meat-and-global-warming/

Visit a pumpkin patch.
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October 8, 2009
In Oregon, we have access to amazing local farms that transform themselves into pumpkin patches over the month of October. The area surrounding Salem and Portland is home to over a dozen locations for corn mazes, hay rides, petting zoos...and pumpkins too. While you're there, buy some of the local produce or fresh apple juice for sale. Enjoy an autumn day outdoors, talk with your neighbors, support a local farm, and have some fun.  
 
Portland information: http://www.pumpkinpatchesandmore.org/ORpporteast.php 
Salem information: http://www.pumpkinpatchesandmore.org/ORpsalem.php

Join in Oregon's bounty.
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September 17, 2009
Coinciding with the August through November harvest season, "Oregon Bounty" features events and activities at craft breweries, wineries, artisan distillers, restaurants and lodging properties in all regions of the state. Visitors have the opportunity to meet a variety of artisan producers including winemakers, brewers, distillers and farmers who create Oregon's culinary wonders.
 
Oregon Bounty is produced by Travel Oregon in partnership with Oregon's many destination-marketers and industry guilds.
 
For more information visit the Oregon Chamber of Commerce.