Text Size:   A+ A- A   •   Text Only
Find     
Site Image

Commissioners
Chair
Chair Andrea Cano
Chair Alberto Moreno 
Alberto Moreno, Portland

Alberto Moreno is the Executive Director for the Oregon Latino Health Coalition, a statewide organization whose mission is to eliminate health disparities for Latinos in Oregon. As the Executive Director his focus is on addressing longstanding health inequities for Latinos in Oregon through policy and systems reform. Key policy priorities include ensuring that all pregnant women in Oregon have access to prenatal care services and that all children in Oregon truly have equal and unabridged access to timely medical care.
 

Vice Chair
Commissioner Gilbert P. Carrasco 
Vice Chair John Haroldson 
John Haroldson, Corvallis

The son of a Scandinavian father and a Mexican mother, John Haroldson was raised both in the Pacific Northwest and in Monterrey, Mexico, where he developed a rich bilingual and bicultural perspective. He holds the honor of serving as Oregon's first Mexican-American District Attorney in Benton County, Oregon.

Mr. Haroldson has demonstrated a long-term commitment towards ensuring equal opportunity access for underrepresented individuals. He serves on the Advisory Board for the César Chávez Cultural Center at Oregon State University and as a Presenter for the Oregon State University CAMP and 4H Programs, where he works with monolingual Spanish speaking students and resides in Corvallis with his wife Maria.

He earned a Bachelor's Degree in Philosophy from Central Washington University and a Doctorate in Jurisprudence from the University of Oregon. He is a member of the Oregon and Washington State Bar Associations.
 
Commissioners
 
Commissioner John Haroldson
Andrea Cano 
Andrea Cano, Portland

A social justice advocate and communications specialist, Andrea Cano is a Chicana who has served the people in this state as the director of the Oregon Farm Worker Ministry, administrator of a national media project to bring low power-FM radio stations to local communities, and as a consultant to multicultural, ecumenical, and interfaith organizations. Her international work has taken her to 30 countries including many in Latin America and the Spanish –speaking Caribbean. Originally from California, she lived in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, and Quito, Ecuador, before settling in Oregon in 1999. She is a member of  LACE (Latina Associates for Collaborative Endeavors), a new initiative of the Non-Profit Association of Oregon; the Metropolitan Youth Symphony's Board of Directors, and ENLACE International's CUP Directorate. With a Master in Divinity conferred by the Pacific School of Religion in 2011, she is a hospital chaplain at Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center.  She led OCHA as vice chair from 2010-2011, and chair from 2011-2013.


Commissioner John Haroldson
Gilbert P. Carrasco
Gilbert P. Carrasco, Portland

Gilbert Paul Carrasco is an expert in civil rights law, immigration law and constitutional law. He is the author of three national casebooks on these subjects and numerous law review articles. He has taught as a visiting professor at Lewis & Clark, Oregon, San Diego, Seton Hall and Willamette. He also studied for extended periods at Oxford, Stanford, Hastings and George Washington. Professor Carrasco teaches Civil Rights, Constitutional Law and Employment Discrimination. In 2008, he joined the board of directors of the Oregon chapter of the American Constitution Society. The following year, he was appointed to the Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs by Gov. Ted Kulongoski.
 Commissioner John Haroldson
Cynthia Carmina Gómez
Cynthia Carmina Gómez, Portland

Cynthia Carmina Gómez is a first generation Mexican-American raised in Yuma, Arizona. She moved to Oregon in 1993 and holds a Masters degree in Education, a Certificate in Chicano/Latino Studies and a Bachelors in Sociology. Today, Cynthia works at Portland State University as the Director of Cultural Centers in the Department of Diversity and Multicultural Student Services. In 1999, she became a faculty member in University Studies with a focus on teaching social justice and sustainability community-based learning courses.

In 2003, Cynthia began working with the Portland non-profit Latino Network, first as a board member, where she co-founded Concilio Somos el Futuro; then as a direct service provider to adjudicated youth; and most recently, as the Director of Civic Engagement and Leadership Programs. She also worked as a Coordinator for the Oregon Leadership Institute, where she collaborated with college students and high school Latino students in partnership with Portland Public Schools and the Oregon Council for Hispanic Advancement; held the title of Program Coordinator for Innovation Partnership; and operated her own consulting firm. She currently serves on the United Way Diversity Advisory Committee; is a parent representative on Bridger’s Portland Public School Site Council; and is a graduate of Leadership Portland, Class 2012.
Commissioner Lupita Maurer
Commissioner Lupita Maurer
Lupita Maurer, Aloha

Lupita Maurer was born in Mexico City. She became a U.S. citizen in 1995. She graduated Magna Cum Laude with a Computer Science degree from Cal State East Bay. Lupita has worked in the high tech field for 17 years. She served as the Chair of a political party in Washington County from 2004 to 2008, and now represents Oregon at the national level.

Labor Commissioner Brad Avakian appointed her member of the Oregon Council for Civil Rights from 2009-2011. She was recently appointed to the Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs by Governor Kitzhaber. Lupita enjoys talking to middle school girls to encourage them to study math and science. Lupita has two children, one in college and one in middle school, and lives in Aloha, OR.

 

Commissioner Judith A. Parker
Commissioner Judith A. Parker
Judith A. Parker, Portland

An attorney specializing in professional liability defense and labor and employment law, Ms. Parker is a member of the Oregon Hispanic Bar Association. Her professional memberships also include the Oregon State Bar and the Hispanic National Bar Association.
 
Ms. Parker has been a lawyer since 2006, first at Schwabe Williamson & Wyatt and then at the Portland office Hinshaw & Culbertson. Previously she was an associate at Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt for three years.  Prior to her legal career, Ms. Parker worked for the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly the Immigration and Naturalization Service) as a district adjudication officer. Before that, she was an immigration caseworker and congressional speechwriter for former U.S. Representative Darlene Hooley (D-Oregon, Fifth District).
 
Ms. Parker said, "I'm committed to educating other Latino/a children around this state that they are able do whatever they dream, that they are equally worthy of their classmates to succeed.  I pledge to be worthy of the Commission's goal: to work for the implementation of economic, social, legal, and political equity for Hispanics in Oregon."   
Commissioner Carlos Perez
Commissioner Carlos Perez
Carlos Perez, Beaverton

An educator, Carlos Perez retired from the Hillsboro School District in 2009 after 10 years as Deputy Superintendent and 31 years overall in the district. Prior to Hillsboro Carlos taught in Idaho for several years. Currently, Carlos is an education consultant focusing on the areas of educational equity and school climate.
 
Carlos Perez also has a history of leadership in social justice issues and Latino Leadership. Carlos is a founding member and current president of the Oregon Association of Latino Administrators (OALA,) a founding member and former chair of the Human Rights Council of Washington County and former chair of the Latino Leadership Network of Washington County. Carlos is also a dialogue facilitator with the Uniting to Understand Racism Foundation of Portland.
 
Carlos currently resides in unincorporated Washington County in the Beaverton area with his wife Corine. Carlos has two grown children, Joel who works and resides in Portland and Carly who is serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Dominican Republic.
Commissioner Santiago Ventura
Commissioner Santiago Ventura

Santiago Ventura, Gervais

Santiago Ventura Morales has advocated for farmworker rights in California and Oregon for more than 10 years. As a Community worker he conducted outreach to farmworkers on housing rights, field sanitation and other labor and employment issues. He has presented on numerous occasions to state agencies about problems faced by farmworkers.
 
Previously he was a natural resources advisor to a city government in Oaxaca, Mexico, and oversaw natural resource development in place of origin as part of “cargo” service to community (“cargo” service is part of the self-governance of indigenous communities, where town members serve in positions of power on a volunteer basis.)

Mr. Ventura has a BS in Social Work from the University of Portland and obtained his GED from Chemeketa Community College in Salem, OR. He is fluent in Mixteco Bajo, Spanish and English.

 

Oregon Legislative Assembly Representatives

Senator Chip Shields - D-Portland, District 22

Chip has served in the Oregon House and Senate since 2005 where he focuses on living-wage jobs, health care, schools and equality. In the 2009 session, as Co-Chair of the Public Safety Subcommittee of Ways & Means, he protected services for domestic violence survivors, funding for drug and alcohol treatment, and negotiated and passed a bill that invests $1.5 million in pre-apprenticeship training for women and people of color. [read full bio]
 
Representative Jessica Vega Pederson - D-Portland, District 47

Jessica Vega Pederson is a first term State Representative for Oregon’s House District
47, which includes the Hazelwood neighborhood and most of Portland East of I205.
Jessica serves on the House Committees of Revenue, Energy and Environment, and
Consumer Protection and Government Efficiency and she cochairs the Joint Committees on Tax Credits and Audits and Information Technology. [read full bio]