Text Size:   A+ A- A   •   Text Only
Find     
Site Image

Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs Annual Report 2010
Letter from the Commission
 
February 10, 2011
 
The Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs (OCHA) is pleased to share the 2010 Annual Report of the commission’s activities and achievements, and a forecast for its work in 2011.
 
The year of 2010 was one of transitions in Oregon. We were involved with the leadership of our fellow advocacy commissions in the discussion of our priorities and common work in service to the people of Oregon, the selection of a new OACO administrator, and the move of the OACO offices to Portland. We also witnessed a boisterous campaign for the 2010 U.S. Census, and the election of a new governor and a slate of representatives to the Oregon legislature.
 
In addition, 2010 also commanded our attention as national issues relating to Hispanics/Latinos reverberated to the West Coast. OCHA responded to the causes and effects of Arizona's SB 1070 and the implementation of ICE's Secure Communities policy, born out of frustration with the inability of the U.S. Congress to reform current immigration laws and praxis. We also received myriad reports and studies about the remarkable achievements and regrettable inequities of our community in the areas of health, education, employment, economic development, political leadership, cultural and civic engagement.
 
We responded to these issues through the strategic networking afforded to our commission with the election of OCHA Chair José Ibarra as president of the United States Council on Latino Affairs. USCLA links the cognate state Hispanic commissions throughout the country.
Furthermore, in Oregon, OCHA's relationships with numerous civil and government sectors continued to build with the presentations and attendance of key elected leadership and state staff at the commission's meetings, the work sessions for pending legislation, and response and action to local community issues.
 
We also participated in or endorsed a good number of conferences and events organized by Oregon's Hispanic/Latino professional and community organizations that offered strategies for public policy development and solutions to issues of common concern.
Recall that the 2008 OCHA Annual Report addressed the long history of Hispanic/Latino settlement in this state since the 19th century. The 2009 OCHA Annual Report focused on the situation of the second generation, children and youth of Latino immigrants who will contribute to the prosperity and cultural diversity in the years to come, claiming that in ―addressing their needs, we are actually investing in the future of all.
 
Our 2010 Annual Report emphasizes the diversity of the Hispanic/Latino community in Oregon, and presents a new narrative, descriptive of the multivalency in Oregon’s fastest growing ethnic group and the commission’s fitting responses in its outreach efforts and initiatives for new partnerships.
 
Hence, OCHA is positioned to enter 2011 emboldened with new energy, wisdom, and its principles of consultation and collaboration to serve as mandated by the State of Oregon.
 
 
Sincerely,
 
 
 
Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs
 
OCHA Annual Report 2010