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news_2014

Senate Approves Melissa Cribbins' Appointment to LCDC

June 2, 2014
Salem, OR – The Oregon Senate approved Governor Kitzhaber’s appointment of Melissa Cribbins to represent the coast on the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC).
 
Cribbins will replace Tim Jossi, who served on the commission since 2004, until completion of his second term at the end of June 2013. Cribbins’ four year term begins June 1, 2014, and she will join the commission’s July 24-25, 2014, meeting in Ontario.
The LCDC consists of seven members, representative of certain regions of the state along with a current or former elected official of a city and a county (Cribbins is currently serving in her first term on the Coos County Board of Commissioners).  LCDC adopts state land-use goals, assures local plan compliance with the goals, coordinates state and local planning and manages the coastal zone program. The commissioners are unpaid citizen volunteers appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. Commissioner appointments are four-year terms and may not serve for more than two full terms.
 
Cribbens was raised in Coos County, graduating from Coquille High School before receiving her bachelors of science in biology and biochemistry from Portland State University.  Cribbins then worked in the field of drinking water treatment, including several years at the City of Spokane as its water quality manager.  She graduated cum laude from the Gonzaga University Law School.  After clerking for the Douglas County Circuit Court, Cribbens returned home to Coos County and spent the next five years working as an attorney for the Coquille Indian Tribe.  Cribbins was elected to the Coos County Board of Commissioners in 2012. 
Explaining her interest in serving on the commission, Cribbins says “Rural Oregon is blessed with so many natural opportunities – timber, fishing, water, natural resources – and good, hardworking people.  These resources are the key to our future.  We must use them, but use them wisely and carefully, preserving what is special about our place in the world and our way of life.  Effective land use planning is one way to do so.” 
DLCD’s Director, Jim Rue said, “We are delighted to have someone with Ms. Cribbins’ expertise on the commission.  Her background and experience allow her to represent not only the land use issues along the coast, but all of Oregon.” 
Individuals interested in appointments to Oregon’s boards or commissions are encouraged to complete and submit an interest form.
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Senate Approves Robin McArthur's Appointment to LCDC

June 2, 2014
Salem, OR – The Oregon Senate approved Governor Kitzhaber’s appointment of Robin McArthur to represent the Willamette Valley on the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC).
 
McArthur will replace Marilyn Worrix, who served on the commission since February 1, 2004, including the last three years as commission chair.  McArthur’s four year term begins June 1, 2014, and she will join the commission’s July 24-25, 2014, meeting in Ontario.
The LCDC consists of seven members, representative of certain regions of the state along with a current or former elected official of a city and a county.  LCDC adopts state land-use goals, assures local plan compliance with the goals, coordinates state and local planning, and manages the coastal zone program. The commissioners are unpaid citizen volunteers appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. Commissioner appointments are four-year terms and may not serve for more than two full terms.
McArthur has a long history with Oregon’s land use planning program, beginning with her Master’s thesis as a graduate student at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C.  After moving to Oregon in 1982, McArthur worked for the City of Portland, seeking different positions in the housing, land use, and transportation departments to build a base of knowledge on how cities grow and development.
Later, McArthur held planning positions at the Oregon Department of Transportation, and served as Governor Kitzhaber’s community development advisor in his first two terms.  Before stepping down last June, McArthur served as the Planning and Development Director for Metro for eight years, guiding the Portland metropolitan region through an urban growth boundary expansions as well as the first designation of urban and rural reserves for the tri-county area. 
“I believe in the future of Oregon,” says McArthur.  “We have rich natural resources, incredibly diverse landscapes, vibrant communities, and a growing economy.  I’ve travelled and lived many places but I always return.”  Explaining her interest in serving on the commission, McArthur says “I am particularly interested in promoting ways to integrate the activities of the Department of Land Conservation and Development with other state and local entities to help solve community development problems on the ground. Communities need resources to address the types of complex problems they face.  I believe that all levels of government should work together to provide communities with a variety of tools to address local issues, and I have sought to do that throughout my career.  Serving on the commission is a continuation of that effort.”
DLCD’s Director, Jim Rue said, “McArthur’s experience in land use, transportation, and community development issues are a huge asset to the state and the commission.  McArthur’s long career at the local, regional, and state level, grappling with these issues both on the ground and at a policy level, makes her a perfect fit.” 
Individuals interested in appointments to Oregon’s boards or commissions are encouraged to complete and submit an interest form.
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Oregon DLCD Tsunami Land Use Guidance Released

January 17, 2014

“Preparing for a Cascadia Subduction Zone Tsunami: A Land Use Guide for Oregon Coastal Communities” prepared by the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD), was released on January 15, 2014.
 
This tsunami land use guidance was developed by DLCD in partnership with a diverse and capable advisory committee comprised of representatives of local government and state agencies facilitated by Cogan Owens Cogan, a multi-disciplinary consulting firm.   Advisory committee members from local governments included representatives from the cities of Cannon Beach, Coos Bay, Depoe Bay, Lincoln City, Manzanita, Seaside, Waldport, Yachats, and also included Coos County.
 
The purpose of the guidance is to assist vulnerable communities as they incorporate tsunami resilience measures into their local land use programs. The land use guide is designed to be tailored by communities to address their individual tsunami risk and location, and provides comprehensive information focused on land use planning approaches to reduce tsunami hazard risk and implement important land use resilience measures.
 
The guidance includes sample tsunami related comprehensive land use plan text and policies, information on needed map amendments, a tsunami hazard overlay (THO) zone model to implement resilience measures, tsunami land use strategy financing and incentive concepts, tsunami evacuation route plan assistance, information relating to pre-disaster community land use planning for a Cascadia event tsunami, and web links to other helpful information.   The guide’s model comprehensive plan, zoning code and other provisions are designed to be used with the new Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Tsunami Inundation Maps (TIMs).  The guide is web based with links to other resources. 
 
The department will begin assisting communities implement the guidance in early 2014. 
 
Laren Woolley, DLCD’s Coastal Shores Specialist indicated that “The Japan earthquake and tsunami are what we can expect here in Oregon. This is a serious threat to our coast and we need to prepare now.  We should have a sense of urgency!  This information should be at the core of community preparation.”  Mark Barnes, Planning Director for the City of Cannon Beach, added, “This is useful guidance for any coastal community; highly recommended.”
 
“Preparing for a Cascadia Subduction Zone Tsunami: A Land Use Guide for Oregon Coastal Communities” is available on DLCD’s website by clicking here.  More information about the DLCD tsunami land use guidance may be obtained by contacting Laren Woolley at (541) 514-0091 or emailing laren.woolley@state.or.us. 
 
Financial assistance was provided by the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended, administered by the Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
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Catch A Tide - King Tides Come to the Oregon Coast

January 17, 2014

The final phase of the King Tides photo project is coming up January 29 through 31, 2014. This is the Oregon branch of a worldwide project in which anyone with a camera can help document the reach of the year’s highest high tides, often called “king tides.” Everyone is welcome to participate, they just need to Pick a place, Click a photo and Share it on Flickr. 
 
King Tides occurs several times a year when the moon and sun enter into a special alignment with the Earth. Such tides last for several days and are anywhere between a few inches and several feet above normal. Although king tides aren’t caused by climate change, they offer a snapshot of what rising sea levels could do to coastal areas in just a few decades. Areas affected by these king tides are susceptible to higher water levels from increased wave heights, winter storms and changes in sea levels.
 
Helpful king tide photos will show water levels adjacent to a fixed feature like a piling, seawall, road, or bridge abutment. Including fixed features will allow actual water levels to be documented and tracked over time. Photos should include the location, the date and time the photo was taken, and the viewer’s direction for each picture. The ideal photo would be taken from a location where the photographer can return later at an ordinary high tide to take a comparison shot.
 
Participating photographers are asked to post their photographs on the project’s Flickr site, http://www.flickr.com/groups/oregonkingtides/. Those who don’t wish to use Flickr can e-mail their photo files to orkingtide@gmail.com. More information can be found on the website: www.coastalatlas.net/kingtides.
 
The Oregon King Tides project is sponsored by the Coastal Management Program of Oregon’s Department of Land Conservation and Development, and co-sponsored by CoastWatch (volunteer program of the Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition), the Oregon chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, and the Mid-Coast Watersheds Council.
 
At the conclusion of the project, a celebration will be held beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, January 31, at the South Beach location of the Rogue Brewery in Newport. The best of the King Tide photos will be shown, photographers will be on hand to comment, and John Bauer of the Wetlands Conservancy will be there to show and discuss recent aerial photos of Oregon wetlands taken during the last king tide event. The event is free and open to all (some refreshments provided, beer and meals available from the Rogue).
 
For more information about the project, please contact Meg Gardner, NOAA Coastal Fellow, at the Oregon Coastal Management Program in Newport: (541) 574-4514 or meg.gardner@state.or.us.  For information about the final celebration, contact Fawn Custer, CoastWatch Volunteer Coordinator, at (541) 270-0027, fawn@oregonshores.org. 
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