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STAR Award Presented to Port of Portland

 STAR Award Presented to Port of Portland
 

The 2015 STAR Award for Citizen Involvement has been awarded by the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) to the Port of Portland for their excellence in creating and leading a Community Advisory Committee (CAC).  The award will be presented in Salem at the Oregon Department of Transportation in the Gail Achterman Commission Room, 355 Capitol St. NE, Salem, Oregon 97301 on Monday, March 20.

The award recognizes the Port of Portland for actively promoting and implementing the values of Oregon's Statewide Planning Goal 1: Citizen Involvement.  Through their outstanding public involvement efforts the Port has created a diverse 30-member CAC that builds on the 2008-2011 PDX Airport Futures planning process.  The committee has a mission to support collaborative public dialogue on airport-related planning and development, provide early opportunities for the community to inform decision-making processes, and to raise public awareness about PDX and impacted communities.  The CAC represents regional interests, and creates a sustainable interconnection between environment, social responsibility and development within the airport district.

STAR Award recommendations are made to the LCDC by the state's Citizen Involvement Advisory Committee (CIAC).  "I am continually impressed by the creativity and thoughtfulness of our applicants," said CIAC Chair Steve Faust.  "Each year we learn about new, innovative approaches to public involvement through the STAR Award nominations.  The Port of Portland is doing great work."

Criteria for nominations include citizen involvement efforts that:

  • Provide early notice and input opportunities for people who are potentially affected by a land use decision;
  • Use creative outreach techniques to seek out those who will potentially be affected by a land use decision (particularly efforts that use limited resources well);
  • Provide clear, accessible communications to the public;
  • Use public input to affect a land use decision;
  • Encourage community participation and collaboration;
  • Provide ideas or methods which will be transferable to others working on land use processes; and
  • Evaluate and improve methods of public involvement as process evolves.

"We're honored to receive this award, which is a tribute to all those who serve on this committee, and who served on the founding PDX Airport Futures planning advisory group," said Curtis Robinhold, Port deputy executive director.  "This approach guiding us on airport-related planning and development will serve as a model for involving the community on our projects in the future."

Past winners include the City of Newberg, the City of Eugene, the City of Portland, the City of Aloha, and the City of Prineville.

More information about the award is available on the Department of Land Conservation and Development website at: http://www.oregon.gov/lcd/pages/star_award.aspx

 

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Goal 5 Historic Resources Rule Amendments

NEWS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:     Rob Hallyburton, (503) 934-0018, (503) 931-7823 Cell,
                    rob.hallyburton@state.or.us

 

Goal 5 Historic Resources Rule Amendments

 

The Land Conservation and Development Commission, a governor appointed body that sets land use policy for the state, adopted changes to its rule guiding protection of historic resources at its meeting in St. Helens on January 27, 2017.  The proposed changes are in response to several disputes around the state that revealed issues with the existing rule.

Some of the disputes centered on properties nominated for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.  Disagreements over who qualifies as an owner of a property have arisen.  Some neighborhoods divided over whether remodeling or replacing homes should be regulated in order to preserve historic character.  Other issues have arisen when a city or county removes a property from its own register of historic places without involving the public.

The rule changes explain how the state rules interact with federal processes for areas listed on the National Register of Historic Places and provide a minimum level of protection from demolition for these most valuable resources.  The changes make the rule clearer in order to make it more usable and understandable for cities and counties, particularly as they relate to laws allowing property owners to opt out of historic protection.  They do not affect any sites or districts that are already designated as historic, except to set the minimum review requirement for consideration of requests to demolish a landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

###

 

Oregon's statewide land use planning program - originated in 1973 under Senate Bill 100 - protects farm and forest lands, conserves natural resources, promotes livable communities, facilitates orderly and efficient development, helps coordination among local governments, and enables citizen involvement.

The program affords all Oregonians predictability and sustainability to the development process by allocating land for industrial, commercial and housing development, as well as transportation and agriculture.

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) administers the program.  A seven-member volunteer citizen board known as the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) guides DLCD.

Under the program, all cities and counties have adopted comprehensive plans that meet mandatory state standards.  The standards are 19 Statewide Planning Goals that deal with land use, development, housing, transportation, and conservation of natural resources.  Periodic review of plans and technical assistance in the form of grants to local jurisdictions are key elements of the program.

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State Approves Housing Pilot Program

 

NEWS RELEASE

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 31, 2017

 

CONTACT:     Carrie MacLaren, DLCD Deputy Director, (503) 934-0051
                    Gordon Howard, DLCD Principal Urban Planner, (971) 673-0964

 

State Approves Housing Pilot Program

 

The Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission approved administrative rules for a housing pilot program at its meeting in St. Helens last Thursday, January 26.  The rules implement House Bill 4079, which allows two cities to develop affordable housing on up to 50 acres outside their urban growth boundaries without going through the normal urban growth boundary expansion process.

 

"This is the latest of several efforts by the Department of Land Conservation and Development to address the shortage of affordable housing," said Commissioner Robin McArthur.  "I'm especially proud that the rules and rulemaking process lay out a comprehensive list of measures cities can take to promote affordable housing, even if they are not part of the pilot program."

 

The Commission will select two cities for the pilot program, one of up to 25,000 population and one with more than 25,000.  At least 30 percent of the housing developed by the pilot projects must be affordable to families whose incomes are at or below 80 percent of the area median income, unless the development is a manufactured home park (in which case the income limit is 100 percent of the area median income).  House Bill 4079 states cities of Multnomah, Clackamas, Washington, Polk, Marion, and Jefferson Counties are not eligible for the program, and the pilot projects cannot be sited on high-value farmland.

 

"We are eager to see applications from cities and housing partners.  The application requirements were constructed to be flexible and open to different types of development, and encourage a race to the top for the most compelling, competitive proposals - those that provide a higher percentage of affordable housing, and those that serve the neediest among us - to win approval," said Commissioner Bart Eberwein.  "We are grateful to our various partners who helped develop this pilot program."

 

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) developed the rules through a nine month rulemaking process, which included a committee of people representing housing developers, cities, counties, researchers, and affordability advocates.  The process included two webinars attended by representatives of local government, housing developers, homebuilders, and consultants.  Given the urgency of the issue, the commision moved quickly, and adopted the rules more than five months before the legislative deadline of July 1, 2017.

 

"We hope this pilot program can provide long-term affordable housing for those Oregonians who desperately need it," said Jim Rue, Director of DLCD.  "We also hope the program enhances our understanding of the barriers to the development of affordable housing, including the intersection of urban growth boundaries and housing prices."

 

Applications for the pilot program will be available in the late spring.  The Department will provide technical assistance to cities and their partners who are interested in the opportunity.  Cities interested in the program should contact Gordon Howard, Principal Urban Planner, at (971) 673-0964.

 

House Bill 4079 was part of a package of four housing bills passed by the 2016 Oregon Legislature.  Housing affordability remains a top concern of the 2017 Oregon Legislature, as well as the Department of Land Conservation and Development.  DLCD plans to publish additional resources on affordable housing in the coming months.

 

For more about the rules, visit: http://www.oregon.gov/LCD/Pages/HB4079_AHPP.aspx
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Oregon's statewide land use planning program - originated in 1973 under Senate Bill 100 - protects farm and forest lands, conserves natural resources, promotes livable communities, facilitates orderly and efficient development, helps coordination among local governments, and enables citizen involvement.

 

The program affords all Oregonians predictability and sustainability to the development process by allocating land for industrial, commercial and housing development, as well as transportation and agriculture.

 

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) administers the program.  A seven-member volunteer citizen board known as the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) guides DLCD.

 

Under the program, all cities and counties have adopted comprehensive plans that meet mandatory state standards.  The standards are 19 Statewide Planning Goals that deal with land use, development, housing, transportation, and conservation of natural resources.  Periodic review of plans and technical assistance in the form of grants to local jurisdictions are key elements of the program.

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Snap the Shore, See the Future!

NEWS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (Good through Jan. 12, 2017)

CONTACT:     Meg Reed, (541) 574-0811, meg.reed@state.or.us
                    Fawn Custer, (541) 270-0027, fawn@oregonshores.org
                    Ryan Cruse, (503) 729-7471, rcruse@surfrider.org

Snap the Shore, See the Future!
Last call to photograph king tides this winter season

The final round of this season's King Tides Photo Project is coming up January 10-12, 2017.  This project is part of a worldwide initiative in which anyone with a camera can help document the reach of the year's highest high tides, often called "king tides."  Everyone is welcome to participate, they just need to Pick a place, Click a photo and Share it online.

The King Tide Project is sponsored by the Oregon Coastal Management Program, CoastWatch, and the Surfrider Foundation.  The Oregon Coastal Management Program, which is housed within the Department of Land Conservation and Development, works in partnership with coastal local governments, state and federal agencies, and other stakeholders to manage, conserve, and develop Oregon's coastal and ocean resources.  These groups have been spearheading the king tides photo project in Oregon since the winter of 2010/2011.

While the term 'king tide' isn't a scientific tern, it is used to describe an especially high tide event, when the sun, moon, and earth are in alignment, causing the greatest gravitational pull on the tides.  When king tides occur during floods or storms, water levels can rise to higher levels and have the potential to impact infrastructure, property, and the coastline.

King Tide events give us athe opportunity to peek into the future and see what the impacts of sea level rise could look like on our coastal communities.  Even a small increase in sea levels could increase the intensity and impacts of winter storms along the Oregon coast, intensifying chronic hazards like erosion and flooding, and decreasing the width of the public beach.  By capturing images of these extreme high tides, scientists and planners hope to gain insight into how rising sea levels will impact coastal areas in the future. The long-term dataset can help inform residents and decision makers about the need to plan for the coming changes to our natural and built environments.

Help document these events for the King Tides Photo Project.  The next King Tides series is January 10-12, 2017.

Helpful king tide photos show water levels adjacent to a fixed feature like a piling, seawall or bridge abutment.  Including fixed features allows actual water levels to be documents and tracked over time.  Good photos also must include the location, the date and the time of the photo, and the viewer's direction for each picture. Two photos taken from the same spot, one during the king tide and the other at a typical high tide are also very effective in highlighting these high water events.  Find tide tables for your area and instructions for how to take and upload photos on the King Tides website: www.oregonkingtides.net.

For more information about the technical aspects of the project, contact Meg Reed, Coastal Shores Specialist with the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development, (541) 574-0811, meg.reed@state.or.us.  For information about the project and about participating in the special effort to document the King Tides in the marine reserve areas, contact Fawn Custer, CoastWatch Volunteer Coordinator, at (541) 270-0027, fawn@oregonshores.org.

Upcoming Presentations and Celebrations:

January 6, 2017 - 6:30 PM
Talk: Planning for Future Flooding in Oregon's Estuaries
Tillamook Bay Community College, 4301 3rd St, Tillamook

January 7, 2017 - 10:00 AM
Talk: Modeling effects of sea level rise in Oregon's estuaries
Guided CoastWatch Walk to follow to include trainings for CoastWatch Mile, King Tide Photos, and other citizen science opportunities.
Cannon Beach City Hall, 163 E Gower Ave, Cannon Beach

January 8, 2017 - 1:00 PM
Talk: King Tides Photo Project and Citizen Science Opportunities
Seaside Public Library, 1131 Broadway St, Seaside
Guided CoastWatch Walk to follow at 3 PM. Meet at the parking lot between 11th St and 12th Ave.

January 9, 2017 - 10:30 AM
Talk: Shoreline Armoring and King Tides Photo Project
North County Recreational District, Room 4, 36155 9th St, Nehalem

January 9, 2017 - 1:00 PM
Guided CoastWatch Walk with trainings for CoastWatch Mile, King Tide photos, and other citizen science opportunities
Treasure Cove Beach Lane, 495 Beach St, Manzanita

January 9, 2017 - 6:30 PM
Talk: Shoreline Armoring and King Tides Photo Project
Rockaway City Hall, 276 S Hwy 101, Rockaway Beach

January 27, 2017 - 5:30 PM
King Tide Wrap-Up Party in South Beach
Rogue Brewery, 2320 SE Marine Science Drive, South Beach, OR
Cost: Suggested Donation $5

February 4, 2017 - 4:00-7:00 PM
King Tide Wrap-Up Party in Charleston
Charleston Marine Life Center, 63466 Boat Basin Drive, Charleston, OR
Cost: Suggested Donation $5

King tide Wrap-Up Party in Seaside - TBD (check website for details)

**Whenever you are on the Oregon Coast it is imperative that you keep an eye on the ocean at all times.  Never put yourself in danger.  Be very cautious of rising water, eroding shorelines, flooded roadways, and high winds during any extreme high tide events.**

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Goal 5 Historic Resources Rule Amendments

NEWS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:     Rob Hallyburton, (503) 934-0018, (503) 931-7823 cell,
                    rob.hallyburton@state.or.us

Goal 5 Historic Resources Amendments

The Land Conservation and Development Commission, a governor appointed body that sets land use policy for the state, will hold a public hearing consider changes to its rule guiding protection of historic resources at its meeting in St. Helens on January 27, 2017.  The proposed changes are in response to several disputes around the state that revealed issues with the existing rule.

Some of the disputes centered on properties nominated for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.  Disagreements over who qualifies as an owner of a property have arisen.  Some neighborhoods divided over whether remodeling or replacing homes should be regulated in order to preserve historic character. Other issues have arisen when a city or county removes a property from its own register of historic places without involving the public.

The commission intends for the rule changes to explain how the state rule interacts with federal processes for areas listed on the National Register of Historic Places and provide a minimum level of protection from demolition for these most valuable resources.  The changes make the rule clearer in order to make it more usable and understandable for cities and counties.  They will not affect any sites or districts that are already designated as historic, except to set minimum review requirement for consideration of requests to demolish a landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The commission will accept testimony until the close of the hearing.  For more information, contact the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development, or visit the commission meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/LCD/Pages/meetings.aspx.
###

Oregon's statewide land use planning program - originated in 1973 under Senate Bill 100 - protects farm and forest lands, conserves natural resources, promotes livable communities, facilitates orderly and efficient development, helps coordinate among local governments, and enables citizen involvement.

The program affords all Oregonians predictability and sustainability to the development process by allocating land for industrial, commercial and housing development, as well as transport and agriculture.

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) administers the program.  A seven-member volunteer citizen board known as the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) guides DLCD.

Under the program, all cities and counties have adopted comprehensive plans that meet mandatory state standards.  The standards are 19 Statewide Planning Goals that deal with land use, development, housing, transportation, and conservation of natural resources.  Periodic review of plans and technical assistance in the form of grants to local jurisdictions are key elements of the program.

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New Community Engagement Award Announced

 

News Release

 

January 3, 2017

 

Contact:     Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us
                  Casaria Taylor, (503) 934-0065, casaria.taylor@state.or.us

 

New Community Engagement Award Announced

 

Oregon's land use program was designed to protect and enhance the values we cherish as Oregonian's; community input, affordable housing, a healthy economy, clean air and water, farm and forest protection, transportation choices, and livable communities.  the Land Conservation and Development Commission recently established the "Achievment in Community Engagement" (ACE) awards to recognize outstanding examples of community engagement.

 

The ACE Award recognizes organizations and individuals who have actively promoted and implemented the values of Oregon's Statewide Planning Goal 1: Citizen Involvement through an outstanding community engagement strategy.  ACE award recommendations are made to the LCDC by the state's Citizen Involvement Advisory committee (CIAC).  "The ACE awards are an opportunity to showcase and learn from the best examples of community engagement from across the state," said CIAC Chair Steve Faust.

 

Eligible Entities/Award Categories:

  • Government Entities
  • Community Organizations
  • Individual Community Members

Critera for nominations include citizen involvememt efforts that:

  • Intentional design of public participation process
  • Inclusion of historically marginalized communities
  • Early determination of project stakeholders
  • Innovation
  • Creative use of limited resources
  • Clear communication
  • Evaluation methods that improve future public involvement processes
  • Public follow up that ensures public is aware of how their input was incorporated, and
  • A project that was completed by December 31 the prior year

Nomination Process:

  • All nomination applications for ACE 2016 must be submitted by March 1, 2017
  • CIAC will review and make recommendations to LCDC
  • May 2017 - Award recipients will be notified
  • (Date/Venue TBA) Presentation of award

More information about the award and a complete application form is available on the Department of Land Conservation and Development website at: http://www.oregon.gov/LCD/pages/citizeninvolvement.aspx#ACE_Awards_for_Citizen_Involvement

 

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Department Approves Bend Urban Growth Boundary

News Release
 

November 16, 2016

 

Contact:     Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us

 

Department Approves Bend Urban Growth Boundary

 
At the November 16 City Council meeting in Bend, Oregon, Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) Director Jim Rue will congratulate the city and city council on the approval of their urban growth boundary (UGB) expansion. Formally approved by the department on November 14, 2016, the new UGB is the result of years of work, by the city council, city staff, consultants, advisory committees, and the public. The process culminates in a plan that positions Bend well for future growth and development, is supported by the community, and meets both the statewide planning goals and the city’s needs for new lands for housing and employment opportunities. 

“We understand and appreciate the incredible investment the City made in this process,” said Director Rue, “Bend serves as a model for other communities to follow. From the high quality data analysis to the extensive public outreach used to shape this project, the City has taken every measure to produce a high quality urban growth boundary decision.” 

There are many impressive aspects of the final urban growth boundary decision, in particular:
 
·        The designation of “opportunity areas” – where market analysis showed higher levels of support for redevelopment for both employment and housing opportunities;
 
·        A focus on affordable housing, identifying, designating, and obtaining commitments to increase the city’s housing supply;
 
·        And a plan that preserves open space and creates walkable communities, adding to the long-term livability and quality of life in the City of Bend.
 
“I’m pleased to be able to congratulate the City in person for reaching this milestone,” added Director Rue. “We recognize that it is a very big deal to have this work completed, and look forward to seeing the City’s planning efforts implemented.”
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2015 STAR Award Presented to City of Prineville

 

News Release

 

November 16, 2016

Contact:     Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us

 

2015 STAR Award Presented to City of Prineville

 

The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development’s 2015 STAR Award for Citizen Involvement has been awarded by the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) to the City of Prineville for its excellence in performing outreach regarding local marijuana regulations. The award will be presented at a reception held at the Deschutes County Fair and Expo center on November 17, 2016.

The award recognizes the City of Prineville for actively promoting and implementing the values of Oregon’s Statewide Planning Goal 1: Citizen Involvement. Through their outstanding public involvement efforts the city developed marijuana land use codes that are tailored to the needs and concerns of residents. STAR Award recommendations are made to the LCDC by the state’s Citizen Involvement Advisory Committee (CIAC). “I am continually impressed by the creativity and thoughtfulness of our communities,” said CIAC Chair Steve Faust. “Each year we learn about new, innovative approaches to public involvement through the STAR Award nominations. These cities are doing great work.” 

Criteria for nominations include citizen involvement efforts that:

  • Provide early notice and input opportunities for people who are potentially affected by a land use decision;
  • Use creative outreach techniques to seek out those who will potentially be affected by a land use decision (particularly efforts that use limited resources well);
  • Provide clear, accessible communications to the public;
  • Use public input to affect a land use decision;
  • Encourage community participation and collaboration;
    • Provide ideas or methods which will be transferable to others working on land use processes; and
  • Evaluate and improve methods of public involvement as process evolves.


Past winners include the City of Newberg, the City of Eugene, the City of Portland, and the City of Aloha.

More information about the award is available on the Department of Land Conservation and Development website at: http://www.oregon.gov/lcd/pages/star_award.aspx  

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Report Captures Housing Trends, Best Practices

NEWS RELEASE

AUGUST 19, 2016

CONTACT:      Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us
 
Report Captures Housing Trends, Best Practices
 
Important conversations about housing are taking place in Oregon: availability and affordability, housing the homeless, finding affordable places for families, allowing people to age in place, and making room for new-comers.  While there is no one solution for housing issues, there is a new tool that provides useful guidance for Oregonians in a report titled, Character-compatible Space-efficient Housing Options for Single-dwelling Neighborhoods.  The result of a recent partnership between the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD), the Department of Transportation (ODOT), and the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), the report responds to housing trends and best practices identified around the state.  The project was spearheaded by DEQ, with assistance from the Transportation Growth Management Program, a cooperative effort between DLCD and ODOT that helps communities link land use and transportation planning.
 
Oregon Opportunity Network's Policy Advisory, Ruth Adkins, who advocates for housing and community development throughout Oregon, responded to the report saying, "Our state needs a broad range of housing types, prices, and sizes in all neighborhoods.  We are excited to see this report's practical, thoughtful solutions for neighborhood housing options across Oregon."
 
The report provides Oregon communities and citizens with tools for smaller and more affordable housing options that fit well into low- and medium-density neighborhoods.  the report includes case studies, easy reference tables, zoning code analyses, and best practices for four types of housing that can increase the variety and affordability of housing in Oregon's communities:
  • Cottage clusters
  • Internal division of larger homes
  • Corner duplexes
  • Accessory dwelling units
The state agencies prepared this report because these housing options provide several community benefits.  Demographers have demonstrated a need for affordable housing options that meet the needs of smaller households; however, many zoning codes in Oregon instead encourage the development of large, detached homes.  All of the smaller housing types outlined in this report can add to the diversity and affordability of homes in traditional single-dwelling neighborhoods.  Also, research by DEQ has found that building smaller homes is among the best practices to reduce the lifetime carbon and energy impacts of single-dwelling housing.  Finally, the increased density realized by allowing these smaller housing types can help make transit service more feasible, and, where neighborhoods contain an appropriate mix of uses, can better support walking and biking as travel options.
 
Reflecting on writing the report, author Eli Spevak said "It's been a pleasure to learn how jurisdictions across the state have been experimenting with zoning rules for residential neighborhoods.  We hope this report offers inspiration, practical ideas, and lessons learned from early adopters - and that Oregon communities continue to try out new (and old!) ideas to meet their varied housing needs."
 
The complete report is available online:
 
 
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Communities awarded $2.5 million for transportation, land use projects

NEWS RELEASE

AUGUST 16, 2016

CONTACT:      Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us or Shelley M. Snow, ODOT Public Affairs, (503) 986-3438
 
Communities awarded $2.5 million for transportation, land use projects
 
SALEM - Fifteen communities across Oregon - from the Klamath Tribes to Estacada - have been awarded Transportation and Growth Management Program grants to fund transportation and land use planning projects.  The Transportation and Growth Managment Program (TGM), a 23-year partnership between the Department of Land Conservation and Development and the Oregon Department of Transportation, awards grants to support Oregon communities working to create vibrant, livable places where people can walk, bike, take transit or drive where they want to go.
 
"These grants reflect both the transportation planning needs of local governments across the state and the innovation of cities, counties and tribes to meet those future needs for their communities," said Erin Doyle, Intergovernmental Relations Associate from the League of Oregon Cities, and chair of the TGM Program Advisory Committee.  "This round of TGM grants provides more communities across the state with the assistance they need to acomplish these important planning processes.  The TGM program highlights the successes Oregon communities can achieve when the can leverage resources from state and federal partners to complete local planning."
 
For this years's funding cycle, 39 applications requested $5.1 million.  Recipients will work with staff to develop each project, including final award amounts based on the scope of each grant.  Award amounts are expected to range between $75,000 and $200,000.  Award recipients are listed below, and project descriptions are online (PDF).
 
  • City of Astoria
  • City of Estacada
  • City of Heppner
  • City of Keizer
  • City of Molalla
  • City of Newberg
  • City of North Plains
  • City of Portland
  • City of Reedsport
  • City of St. Helens
  • City of Woodburn
  • Klamath Tribes
  • Multnomah County
  • Rogue Valley Transit District
  • Washington County

Awards will be used for various projects, such as updating the city of Heppner's transportation system plan, or TSP, a process that local governments must do regularly in order to move transportation and land use projects forward.  Funds also can be used to develop a coordinated land use and transportation plan, which the city Keizer will be doing to help guide development in several neighborhoods around the city.  Grants also support developing public transit plans - and that's how Rogue Valley Transit District will use its award.

Planning is critical to the success of a community's economic and environmental health, yet there are few sources of transportation and land use planning funds for local governments.  With over 1,100 projects completed, Oregon's Transportation and Growth Management Program continues to provide value by helping communities creaft their future transportation systems in concert with their desired land uses.

In addition to planning grants, the program offers local governments other resources, including education and outreach workshops, speakers and publications; code assistance; quick response; and transportation system plan assessments.  To see examples of the program's accomplishments, see "TGM Tangibles report," or visit "Publications" on the website, www.oregon.gov/LCD/TGM/.

 

 

 
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Department Honored for Sustainability Contributions

NEWS RELEASE

MAY 18, 2016

CONTACT:      Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us

Department Honored for Sustainability Contributions

The Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) will be honroed this Wednesday, May 18th by the University of Oregon's Sustainability program with the "Town and Gown" award.  This award is presented to campus individuals or groups for projects that promote, educate or enhance a more sustainable community.  DLCD has been collaborating with the Green Cities class in hosting community design workshops in cities in the Mid-Willamette Valley since 2013.  The design workshops, or "charrettes," are intended to give city residents a chance to work closely with community leaders to identify and prioritize specific spatial planning and urban design issues and solutions.  The outcome of this community visioning process a suite of products for the community's use including videos, plans, maps, presentation documents, and reports.

Economic Development Specialist, Tom Hogue and Mid-Willamette Valley Regional Representative, Angela Lazarean will collect the award.  Their role in this collaboration has been connecting eligible communities with small planning assistance grants through DLCD to cover expenses for the Green Cities event (for communities under 2,500 population), or with DLCD staff assitance in organizing and coordinating the event (for the city and for those over 2,500).  Incurred costs are for food, materials, and final report preparation and presentation delivered by Ric Stephens, Professor of Planning, Public Policy and Management at the University of Oregon.

The most recent charrette was in Independence this past winter, another one is scheduled this coming summer (July 23) in Gervais.  In Independence, the objectives were to provide specific recommendations for innovative approaches to various community sites and topics including: Main Street, Monmouth Street, Northern Gateway, parks, the Willamette riparian zone, riverside development, Second Street, sense of place and identity, and Western Gateway.

In Gervais, the charrette will focus on public engagement with the Latino community, placement and design of a community center, Downtown development and design, pedestrian environment and multi-modal transportation options, and sustainable development with urban resiliency.

"There is civic capacity element for participating cities," said Mr. Hogue, "after working with them for many years, we can tell which ones are ready to take this kind of step and develop visionary, community centered plans."  "It's a rewarding resource we provide for small communities," added Lazarean, "we engage cities with their citizen to identify a common vision for the future of their community."

"The Town and Gown Sustainability Award for the Green Cities program was made possible by the Department of Land Conservation and Development," said Professor Stephens, "DLCD staff identify candidates cities, coordinate and plan the design charrettes, and help as advisors throughout the program.  So far, more than 250 University of Oregon students and 5 cities have benefited from this program that provides specific implementation actions for cities to become more sustainable, resilient, and regenerative.

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Oregon Housing Study Presented by Hatfield Fellow

NEWS RELEASE

May 17, 2016

CONTACT:      Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us 

Oregon Housing Study Presented by Hatfield Fellow

Julia McKenna started work as a Hatfield Fellow with the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) in August, 2015, focused on housing.  Energy behind the topic grew through the course of the 2016 legislative session, with at least eight bills and countless hours of testimony responding to housing challenges from every part of Oregon getting attention at the capitol.  "Housing has become part of our everday conversation in state agencies," says DLCD Director Jim Rue, "it's everywhere."

As the fellowship concludes, McKenna will deliver a final report and presentation to the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) at their May 19-20 meeting in Albany, Oregon.  During ten months of research, including more than fifty first-person interviews, ten housing conferences and events, and review of 150 reports on housing; five potential areas for consideration to help elevate housing as a priority in Oregon were developed.  Those recommendations are the central focus of the presentation.

DLCD's statewide Planning Goal 10 states that cities will adopt "plans [that] shall encourage the availability of adequate numbers of needed housing units at price ranges and rent levels which are commensurate with the financial capabilities of Oregon households and allow for flexibility of housing location, type and density."  Cities achieve compliance with Goal 10 by zoning land at densities and in the locations that make sense for a particular housing type (e.g. single family or apartments and condominiums).  However, many cities lack the resources to analyze their particular housing needs, or to make the zoning changes necessary to meet those needs, and state funding has not kept pace.

Oregon's land use system was designed to provide long range planning for cities in a way that balances multiple priorities.  While it is only one tool, it is a ready vehicle for the statewide changes needed to effectively tackle issues of housing affordability and availability.  But there are factors beyond land use affecting the operation of housing markets.  Factors created by local governments: zoning, development codes, state and local tax policies, state "fair housing" provisions, landlord-tenant laws, and development impact fees; and those external to government influence: available financing, interest rates, cost of construction, and federal tax policies.  Solutions to the housing crisis in Oregon must be looked at holistically, land use solutions alone will not adequately address the problem.

Alongside Pegge McGuire, Director of the Housing and Energy Services for the Community Services Consortium, McKenna will discuss the affordability and availability of housing in two case study areas, Corvallis/Albany and Hood River/The Dalles as well as discuss the recommended action items: technical assistance to cities, including increased grant money; increasing DLCD staff capacity to focus on housing; an update to Goal 10, as well as Goal 10 monitoring and enforcement; and close coordination with Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS).  When asked about the long term effects of the work, Pegge said, "We have a significant body of research demonstrating that the location of our homes can dictate the physical health and financial success of our children and grandchildren.  It is time to dedicate the  resources and creative thinking necessary to make meaningful change in the lives of our next generations of Oregonians and to continue to demonstrate our place on the cutting edge of national policy."

Reflecting on the outcomes of the fellowship, McKenna said, "If we truly want to solve these problems at a state level it is essential that we dedicate the time of talented people, coordinate the work of multiple agencies, and adequately fund the work.  If we don't, we will continue to see structural inequality and insufficient affordable housing around the state."

Julia will go on to pursue a PhD in Urban Studies at Portland State University beginning Fall 2017.

See the full staff report:
https://www.oregon.gov/LCD/docs/meetings/lcdc/052016/Item_8_Hatfield_Housing_Report.pdf

 

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Nominations Sought for 2015 STAR Award for Citizen Involvement

NEWS RELEASE
 
March 1, 2016
 
CONTACT:      Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us
                      Casaria Taylor, (503) 934-0065, casaria.taylor@state.or.us
 
Nominations Sought for 2015 STAR Award for Citizen Involvement
 
The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development’s Citizen Involvement Advisory Committee (CIAC) is accepting nominations for the 2015 STAR Award for Citizen Involvement. The deadline for nominations is April 29, 2016.
 
The STAR Award for Citizen Involvement recognizes organizations and individuals who have actively promoted and implemented the values of Oregon’s Statewide Planning Goal 1 through an outstanding public involvement effort. The STAR Award is intended to recognize distinct, completed planning efforts and is appropriate for outstanding individuals, student led groups, contracted planning practices, cities, counties, special districts, regional governments, or other land-use planning related planning exercises.
 
Criteria for nominations include citizen involvement efforts that:
  • Provide early notice and input opportunities to those people who will potentially be affected by a land use decision;
  • Use creative outreach techniques to seek out those who will potentially be affected by a land use decision (of particular note will be those efforts that use limited resources well);
  • Provide clear, accessible communications to the public;
  • Use public input to affect a land use decision;
  • Encourage community participation and collaboration;
  • Provide ideas or methods which will be transferable to others working on land use processes; and
  • Evaluate and improve methods of public involvement as process evolves.
Nominations may be submitted by individuals and organizations that are directly involved in a land use-related project, or by a third party. Past winners include the City of Newberg, the City of Eugene, the City of Portland, and the City of Aloha.

More information about the award, including the nomination form, is available on the Department of Land Conservation and Development website at: http://www.oregon.gov/lcd/pages/star_award.aspx
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New Urban Growth Boundary Rules Adopted

December 7, 2015

At the December 3-4 meeting in Salem, the Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC) enacted rules to provide a simpler, more cost effective way for cities to amend urban growth boundaries (UGBs). The new rules authorize cities to use a simplified UGB evaluation method based primarily on population forecasts and a simplified land inventory process. Resulting from the unanimous passage of HB 2254 in the 2013 legislative session, these rules respond to a statewide need for a reformed urban growth management process.

“The land use program was not created in 1974 to remain static,” said the Governor’s Natural Resource Advisor, Richard Whitman, “The magic is in its ability to adapt over time. As the needs, priorities, and values of Oregonians have shifted, so has our land use program. This is a wonderful example of that.” 

The new rules were written with the help of extensive stakeholder input in an effort spanning over two years. The rulemaking advisory committee (RAC) included members from local governments, interest groups, planning consultants, land use attorneys, and others with experience and expertise in the UGB process.

Several RAC members testified in person at the meeting, many opening with comments praising the collaborative, inclusive and respectful nature of the rulemaking process. Jon Chandler, of the Oregon Home Builders Association testified before the commission saying, “Will these rules fix everything? No.” He continued, “But will they help immensely in providing guidance for property owners, developers, and most importantly local governments? You bet.”  

The new rules include evaluation and amendment methods for “small cities” (under 10,000 in populations) and “large cities” (over 10,000). Effective in January 2016, the rules apply outside the Portland metro area.

Responding to concerns that the traditional UGB amendment process was both lengthy and litigious, the new rules seek to bolster the citizen involvement process in the urban management process and reduce the role of disputes over what the law does or does not require. “A shorter, streamlined process allows the public to stay engaged throughout and ensures greater transparency in the process,” said Whitman, “giving the public the transparency they are owed, by letting them know who is making decisions and how.”

The new optional process also has, as a central component, clear and objective standards of review, allowing cities that employ it to proceed with increased certainty that their decisions will withstand appeal.

Nick Lelack, Director of the Deschutes County Community Development Department wrote testimony in strong support of the rules, saying “I believe the proposal to establish a new ‘simplified process’ is a major step forward to streamline and improve the UGB process while preserving the intended outcomes of the Oregon Statewide Planning Program.”

"In adopting these rules, LCDC responded to concerns about the process for approving growth plans of Oregon cities,” said the commission’s Chair, Greg Macpherson. “This is a demonstration of our ongoing commitment to helping them remain great places to live and work."

Sadie Carney, (503) 934-0036, sadie.carney@state.or.us

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Land Use Planning Can Reduce Wildfire Threat and Costs

As we approach the end of the 2015 wildfire season and recall the dramatic and heartbreaking images of record acreages of forestland burned, homes destroyed and lives lost throughout the West, now is the time to take a hard look at how we can meaningfully reduce wildfire threat.
 
The 2015 fire season was worse than any on record. With summertime temperatures steadily escalating, worse is yet to come. Increasing the average summer temperature by just one degree Fahrenheit results in an increase of 420 wildfires in the State annually, according to estimates by the Oregon Department of Forestry. More fires means a need for more fire preparedness, yet research and news articles have focused on only three ways to reduce wildfire risk: forest fuels reduction, creating defensible space around rural dwellings, and improving firefighting methods. In fact, effective land use planning has perhaps the greatest potential for reducing wildfire threat.

The USDA Forest Service defines transition areas just outside communities as the “Wildland-Urban Interface.” Since 1960, the population in these areas has jumped from 25 million to 140 million people – an increase of 460 percent. Today, about 60 percent of all new homes across the nation are being constructed in the Wildland-Urban Interface, despite one historic wildfire season after another. The result is skyrocketing firefighting costs that are ultimately borne by the public.

The cost of fighting fire is primarily capital (e.g. response vehicles) and salaries. Many of those salaries are paid to people putting their lives at risk. The Oregon Department of Forestry has eye-popping data showing that the average cost of $319 to protect an additional home in an already developed area – defined as 99 homes within six miles of a fire – jumps to a whopping $31,545 to protect an additional home where just one other home exists. To put it simply, where densities approach urban levels, the cost of protecting homes from wildfires is relatively low; when homes are located in remote areas, the cost of protecting them is nearly a hundredfold. The cost of protecting homes in rural areas is enormous.

Dwellings in remote and rural areas put firefighters at added risk. Historically trained in basic wildland fire behavior and safety, construction of firelines and the use of tools, firefighters today must have numerous specialized skills geared toward protecting homes, such as establishing fire perimeters, conducting burnouts around homes and dealing with the dangers of propane tanks, gas and electrical lines. And when the focus has shifted from fighting fire to saving homes, forests are left to burn.

Oregon’s statewide land use planning program discourages the kind of development that imperils firefighters and home in this way. Implemented by communities statewide, it has significantly reduced the number of dwellings built in our Wildland-Urban Interface since the mid-1980s, when compared to other states. Limits on dwellings and other development on forest land is paying off for Oregon.

While our interface areas are still largely undeveloped (less than 11 percent developed), Washington’s, by comparison, have seen more extensive development (more than 20 percent developed). Comparing the two states over the course of a decade, Oregon lost almost three times the acreage to wildfire, but the number of dwellings destroyed was significantly greater in Washington, according to the Geographic Area Coordination Centers and the National Interagency Fire Center. In the 2014 and 2015 seasons alone, seven times more dwellings were destroyed in Washington than in Oregon. Forest Service data shows that the presence of dwellings in wildland areas increases the risk of wildfire. In the 2015 fire season “human causes” were the source of four times as many acres burned in Washington as in Oregon. In essence, construction of dwellings in wildland areas results in vulnerability for both structure and forest.

Over nine percent of Oregon’s homes are currently at high or extreme risk for wildfire, according to 2015 data from Verisk Insurance Solutions. Yet pressure continues for additional rural development. Let’s not put more homes, residents, and firefighter’s lives in harm’s way. Oregon’s strong planning program is and can continue to be instrumental in minimizing wildfire risk for new development, in reducing firefighting costs, and in protecting human lives.

Katherine Daniels
Farm and Forest Specialist
Department of Land Conservation and Development
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Amateur Photographers Document King Tides

Mark your calendar, make sure your camera is in working order, and prepare to visit the coast during 2015’s “King Tide” episodes.  Anyone capable of taking a picture can contribute to citizen science and help to focus (literally) attention on high tides and sea level rise.

Through the King Tide Project, photographers help to document the reach of the year’s highest tides, the “King Tides.”  This year the project takes place during three sets of extreme tides: Oct. 27-29, Nov. 24-27, and Dec. 23-25.

For the sixth year, the annual project is being sponsored by the CoastWatch Program of the Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, Surfrider, and the state’s Coastal Management Program, along with local sponsors.  This is the Oregon branch of an international volunteer effort to record the year’s highest tides. (The idea began in Australia, where such events are known as “King Tides,” hence the name.)  Documenting the highest reach of the tides tells us something about areas of the natural and built environments which are subject to erosion and flooding now. It tells us even more about what to expect as sea level rises.

Anyone capable of taking a photograph and able to get to the coast during the series of high tides can help by taking shots anywhere on the coast at the highest point of the tide on those days. These photos can focus on any feature. Those that show the location of the tide in relation to the built environment (roads, seawalls, buildings) are especially useful in demonstrating impending threats.  Subjects can be the outer coast, or estuaries and lower river valleys affected by tides. The ideal photo would be taken from a location where the photographer can return later at an ordinary high tide to take a comparison shot. Photographers are also encouraged to focus on iconic or easily recognizable locations and areas where the high water is impacting infrastructure in order to effectively highlight the effects of rising sea levels.

CoastWatch is making a special effort to organize photographers to document the reach of the King Tides in the vicinity of the new marine reserves (Cape Falcon, Cascade Head, Otter Rock, Cape Perpetua and Redfish Rocks). 

Participants will post photographs online through the King Tide Photo Initiative website, http://www.oregonkingtides.net/  where project information and the online submission form can be accessed.  Be prepared to include the location, date, description, and direction of the photo. 
For more information about the technical aspects of the project, contact Andy Lanier, Coastal Resources Specialist for the Oregon Coastal Management Program at (541) 934-0072, andy.lanier@state.or.us.

At the conclusion of the project, three wrap-up celebrations will be held along the coast: Jan. 8, 2016 in Clatsop County; Jan. 15 in Lincoln County; and Jan. 22 celebration in Coos County.  Exact locations and times will be announced later.  At these events the best of the King Tide photos will be shown, photographers will be on hand to comment, and there will be a special speaker. These events will be free and open to all (appetizers are provided with beverages and meals available for purchase at the venues).

For information about the project, and about participating in the special effort to document the King Tides in the marine reserve areas, contact Fawn Custer, CoastWatch volunteer coordinator, at (541) 270-0027, fawn@oregonshores.org.  

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