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Lower Burnt River Coooperative Weed Management Area
Affiliated Counties or Partnership
Baker
Tri-County CWMA
 
Lower Burnt River CWMA
 
Contact
Lisa Nelson, Coordinator
3809 N. Hartley Rd.
Eagle, ID 83616
Phone:  208-954-7346
Email:  lbrwma@eoni.com
 
 
The following questions were answered by cooperators as part of an Oregon CWMA survey project in 2009.
 
CWMA Mission
Working cooperatively with others to encourage noxious weed control to enhance the productivity and sustainability of our watershed, and pride in our neighborhood.
 
List the Cooperators involved in your CWMA.
Baker County Weed District
Upper Burnt River Weed Control
Natural Resources Conservation Service
Bureau of Land Management
Oregon Department of Transportation
Baker County Road Department
United States Forest Service
Baker County Commissioners
Baker County Extension Service
Burnt River Soil & Water Conservation District
Tri County WMA
 
What makes the structure of your CWMA successful?
The cooperative efforts of all of our landowners and cooperatives has made our CWMA successful.
 
What is the highest priority species in your area?
Whitetop Hoary Cress (Lepidium drab)
Perennial Pepperweed (lepidium latifolium)
Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea Maculosa)
Leafy Spurge (Euphorbia esula)
 
Describe your most valuable outreach/education tool.
Our herbicide give-a-way and seminars with question and answer sessions have been well received by individuals in our CWMA.
 
What are some of your most successful on the ground accomplishments?
We feel our biggest accomplishment is getting our CWMA established and finding the funding to assist the already 35 plus landowners involved in our CWMA to help suppress the invasion of noxious weeds.  With these individuals, and the funding we have received there has been a noticeable decline in Whitetop Hoary Cress (Lepidium drab) in our CWMA.
 
List your highest priority on the ground projects and why they are high priority.
Our CWMA works with approximately 35 landowners each of them have individual priority projects.  We have several good riparian improvement projects, leafy spurge control projects, crop and rangeland productivity projects, all of which include spraying and some seeding.  The riparian projects are important to protect sensitive areas, encourage wildlife and improve water quality.  The crop and rangeland projects improve production. Over all, these projects are working cooperatively with others to encourage noxious weed control to enhance the productivity and sustainability of our watershed, and pride in our neighborhood.
 
What would you say is your CWMA's largest obstacle in the way of achieving your mission?
The largest obstacle in the way of achieving our mission is the huge number of acres of invasive weeds that we have in our CWMA.  Accessibility due to terrain, man hours needed and money are other major obstacles we deal with.
 
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