Text Size:   A+ A- A   •   Text Only
Find     
Site Image
coltsfoot (Tussilago farara)
NOT KNOWN TO OCCUR IN OREGON PLEASE CALL 1-866-INVADER IF YOU SUSPECT YOU HAVE FOUND THIS SPECIES
USDA Symbol: TUFA

ODA rating: A

Coltsfoot risk assessment
Noxious weed listing process


Other common names
bullsfoot, coughwort, butterbur, foal's foot, horse-foot, horsehoof, foalswort, fieldhove, donnhove
 
Click on image to view larger photo
 
 
Images courtesy Invasives.org
 
If images are downloaded and used from the ODA web site please be sure to credit the photographer.
 
Description
Perennial; flowers in April or early spring. Grows 4 to 8 inches. Bright yellow flowers similar to dandelions appear before leaves emerge. White, fluffy seed heads. Large deep green leaves develop later, often forming a complete canopy covering the soil. Top leaf surface has a smooth, almost waxy appearance, underside is covered with white wool-like hairs. Leaf stems and larger leaf veins distinctly purple in color. Spreads by underground rhizomes, which produce dense patches of above-ground foliage ranging from 10 to 20 feet in diameter.
 
Impacts
The most common location for coltsfoot is on roadsides, both township roads and highways. From this foothold, it can spread by seed or rhizomes to adjacent fields. While this weed does not spread rapidly, it is of concern because there are very few herbicides that will control it adequately, and it thrives in several crops.
 
Known hazards
Many experts warn that alkaloids found in ths plant can be dangerous and the herb should not be used internally at all.  In some countries it's use has been prohibited or regulated.
 
Introduction
Coltsfoot is a native of Europe and Asia. Coltsfoot gets its specific name from the old name for the White Poplar, Farfarus, since the leaves of this herb have a similar appearance.  At one time, this herb was referred to as Filius ante patrem (meaning "the son before the father" due to the emergence of the star-shaped yellow flowers that whither and die before the green leaves appear.  Coltsfoot was the choice of remedial plants by early herbalists for respiratory difficulties.
 
Distribution in Oregon
There are no known sites of this plant in Oregon. There was however one confirmed find that was eradicated in Hood River County.

Biological controls
No approved biological control agents are available.
 
Informational Links
Oregon WeedMapper