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meadow hawkweed (hieracium pratense)
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USDA Symbol:
CEDE5


ODA rating: A

Meadow knapweed risk assessment
Noxious weed listing process


Distribution
Oregon meadow hawkweed distribution
 
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Images courtesy of Tom Forney, Oregon Department of Agriculture

 
If images are downloaded and used from the ODA web site please be sure to credit the photographer.
 
 
Description
Meadow hawkweed has stems and leaves that exudes milky juice when broken. The stems are bristly and usually leafless, although occasionally a small leaf appears near the midpoint. Stems can reach three feet tall and bear up to 30 half inch flower heads near the top. Flowers are yellow and appears in May - July depending on elevation.
 
Impacts
Plants of the hawkweed complex produce mats of rosettes preventing desirable plants from establishing or surviving. Hawkweeds dominate sites by out competing other species for water and nutrients and by releasing alleopathic compounds from their own decaying leaves. Plants grow well in moist grassy areas but do not tolerate shade well. Hawkweeds are becoming troublesome  in native meadows, prairies, pastures and lawns. Wilderness areas in the Pacific Northwest are at risk of invasion. Meadow hawkweed tends to grow in places where there isn’t constant grazing such as meadows, roadsides, pastures, lawns, and fields.

Introduction
Meadow hawkweed is a perennial weed that came to the United States from Europe.
 
Distribution in Oregon
Known to occur in Wallowa, Hood River and Clackamas counties but has potential to occur in other counties in Oregon.

 
Biological controls
Biological control agents are not used on "A" listed weeds in Oregon. This weed is being managed for eradication or containment.


Printable trifold brochure of meadow hawkweed (pdf)