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ODA 2011-2013 Biennial Report

About this report

Economically, environmentally, and socially, agriculture continues to play a key role in the lives of all Oregonians. Our job at the Oregon Department of Agriculture is to provide service to a wide array of customers—from the rural farmer to the urban consumer. In doing so, we strive to overcome challenges and to create opportunities.

ODA is committed to its three-fold mission of consumer protection and food safety, natural resource protection, and agricultural market development. We carry out that mission with a balance of education, technical assistance, and regulatory oversight. We are problem solvers who conscientiously work to improve the environment and economy of Oregon.

In an effort to improve efficiency and delivery, our agency has done some basic re-organization that takes advantage of the experience and expertise of our people and programs. One thing has not changed—customers of the Oregon Department of Agriculture still receive the same level of excellent service they’ve had in the past. Our employees pride themselves in responding to the needs of our customers.

This 2011-2012 Biennial Report captures the accomplishments and goals of our varied and numerous programs. ODA has a rich history of more than 80 years of dedicated service to the citizens of Oregon. We look forward to continuing the legacy.

Katy Coba, ODA Director

 

Published January 2013

Contact Bruce Pokarney, Director of Communications
Oregon Department of Agriculture
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4559
Website http://oregon.gov/ODA/Pages/pub_br.aspx

 

Cover photo and photo on page 51 by Dan Hull, Food Safety Program.

 

 

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State Board of Agriculture

A 10-member State Board of Agriculture, appointed by the governor, advises the Oregon Department of Agriculture on policy issues and development of rules. Board members serve four-year terms with a maximum of two terms. The board meets four times a year in various locations around the state.

State law requires seven of the appointed members to be farmers or ranchers who represent different segments of agriculture; two board members must represent consumers; and, the tenth member is the chair of the Soil and Water Conservation Commission. The board serves to keep ODA’s director in close touch with the day-to-day issues of producers and consumers.

The ODA Director and the Dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences at Oregon State University serve as ex-officio members of the board without the right to vote.

A major responsibility of the board is to produce a State of Oregon Agriculture Industry Report that is formally presented to the governor and the state legislature every two years. That report is published as a companion document to ODA’s Biennial Report.

In this report to the Governor and State Legislature, the State Board of Agriculture develops key policy initiatives and recommendations that speak to long-term viability and sustainability of Oregon’s farms, ranches, fisheries, and forests. ODA’s programs and activities are often directly tied to these areas:

Priority policy recom​mendations to the legislature, governor, and regulatory agencies

  1. Ensure access to irrigation water (statewide).
  2. Expand markets and increase sales locally, regionally, and internationally.
  3. Support truck transportation, but begin to maximize rail, barging and other water modes to move product to market more efficiently.
  4. Provide relief from the high cost of inputs, including taxes, energy, and labor.
  5. Encourage management of natural resources in a way that enables farming while protecting water, soil, air, habitat, and endangered species.
  6. Support a land use system that protects farmland for farm use.
  7. Support a high quality research, experiment and extension service that enables growers to diversify cropping and capitalize on unique geographic micro-climates and soils, and to remain competitive in a world market.
  8. Offer assistance for food processors—as key markets for growers—with technical and financial help to address wastewater permits that incorporate recycled, reclaimed, or reused water methods and technologies.
  9. Help growers meet new food safety standards that are becoming more stringent and costly.
  10. Help young or new farmers and transitional family farmers successfully become the next generation of aspiring producers.

 

2013 Oregon State of the Ag​​riculture Industry Report: Executive Summary

Creating vibrant, competitive, hea​lthy, and sustainable farms and ranches in Oregon

The board report to the legislature evaluates comparative agriculture data between Oregon and three other western states: Washington, Idaho, and California.

Farm income (gross and net) is arguably the key measure of farm success and viability. Without adequate profit, many farms must rely on outside income, government support, or borrow more than they can repay. This hampers their ability to hire and pay employees, invest in natural resources management, or continue as a business and community member in the long term.

The bad news: Oregon agriculture lags behind our three neighboring states in many key areas.

The good news: Oregon policymakers can take positive actions to help us catch up.

 

By the num​bers

How does Oregon compare, and what can be done to help Oregon’s farmers and ranchers?

  • While Oregon has roughly the same number of farms as Washington, and slightly more than Idaho (and more land in farm use than both states), average sales per farm are half of these two states, and one-fifth that of California farms. Further, Oregon has fewer farms with sales over $100,000 and more farms with sales less than $10,000 than neighboring states. Oregon growers need more help expanding their sales in a variety of markets.
  • Growing food and fiber requires water. Oregon agriculture uses a smaller portion of available Columbia River water than Washington or Idaho. Oregon agriculture needs an assured, growing supply of water to create economic progress. The State of Oregon needs to support Oregon’s Integrated Water Resources Strategy currently under coordination by the Oregon Water Resources Department, placing an emphasis on capture and storage with creative delivery systems and efficient technologies. This includes working with the State of Washington for stored water to be delivered via the Columbia River to expand irrigated production in the Columbia Basin. Expanding the water “pie” for agriculture and other uses can enable more productive ground to be cultivated and create economic stimulus and jobs.
  • Oregon’s agricultural sales have continued a long upward trajectory, but expenses are climbing faster than income, and recent market volatility has taken a toll. Compared to neighboring states, Oregon’s average net farm income is lower, fewer farms have positive net income, and the average income for those farms that are positive is less than in the other states. Oregon growers need assistance in stabilizing costs of production, including energy components, taxes, and a legal workforce.
  • Farmers in all four states are engaged in a variety of programs (local, state, and federal) to address soil conservation, water quality, and wildlife. The three most significant challenges that loom:
    • Threatened and Endangered (T&E) Species listings and habitat designations.
    • Invasive species (plants, pests, and diseases) with their threat to natural, agricultural, forest, and urban landscapes and environments, as well as animals—both livestock and pets.
    • Miles of streams or area of water bodies designated as “water quality impaired” by EPA or the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Such listings prompt the need for Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs, or allowed impairment levels), which influence agricultural management and activities.

​​​​Oregon growers need technical assistance and financial support to address these imperatives.

  • Population growth and expanding urban areas, along with rural non-farm uses, create challenges for agriculture to operate and maintain an adequate supply of land for commercial production without nuisance complaints and other public pressures against common agriculture conditions (noise, dust, smell, etc.). Some growers in various areas of the state favor more flexible land use laws. While limited flexibility is being examined, on the whole, farmers need certainty around land use laws that minimize speculative pressures on farmland prices and limit non-farm conflicting uses.
  • Traded sector agriculture (exports) brings new dollars into Oregon. Not all production can be consumed locally. In fact, 80 percent of Oregon’s agricultural products are shipped out of state. For long-haul shipping, water movement (barge or ship) is the least cost per mile of any mode. Oregon’s ports and shipping lanes, along with container availability, are a priority need for agriculture and all other products moving out of Oregon. While Oregon is larger than Washington, it has fewer rail miles and short lines. Rail is the next most efficient mode of shipping after barging. Food processing and other businesses should be encouraged to locate around port and rail nodes to enable competiveness in moving product out of state. The State of Oregon needs to negotiate short-line rail and railcar capacity measures, including piggyback refrigerated units, to retain cost-competitive options for Oregon growers. Air capacity is also important for high-value export products such as blueberries, seafood, and nursery crops.
  • Long-term competitiveness is driven by productivity gains coming from research that develops new seed varieties, technologies, management systems, and knowledge of plant and animal pests and diseases. Oregon’s statewide agriculture research stations and Extension programs have suffered catastrophic staff reductions of 25 percent over the past decade, threatening the R&D pipeline that underlies Oregon’s economic competitiveness. A robust Research and Extension program at Oregon State University and other schools to support agriculture is key to the future, including training future employees and leaders in all related fields of biosciences. It’s also important for students to know that there are a wide spectrum of jobs in high demand in agriculture and food-related fields.
  • Oregon farmers are aging, and a new generation of growers is on the scene—many of them small-scale producers. Oregon leads Idaho and Washington in the number of farmers’ markets and sales derived from direct-to-consumer or establishments. But more outlets are needed to help these small farms generate higher sales. Successful transition between generations will also require further work on estate taxes. Additionally, fundamental information about agriculture is nearly missing from our schools, where an understanding of farming and food begins. Policy makers can support beginning and small farms in Oregon through:
    • supporting Agriculture in the Classroom program (http://aitc.oregonstate.edu).
    • supporting high school FFA and other technical training programs that can prepare interested students in applied learning and career development related to agriculture and natural resources.
    • exploring creation of an “apprentice” certification for new farmers in Oregon.
    • supporting farm incubator programs.
    • supporting OSU Small Farms Program.
    • supporting food-hub.org and other online marketing outlets for growers.
    • supporting farmers’ markets, farm stands, Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs), and other local venues to expand outlets for small operations.
    • making business planning more readily available to new farm start-ups.
    • eliminating the estate tax for farmland transfers to family or new/beginning farmers.
    • helping solve the transportation puzzle for small farms to get product to customers.
  • How growers and food processors adapt to new production safeguards and testing measures from the federal Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) will prove crucial—not only to maintain the reputation of a product in the market, but also to remain competitive financially despite additional costs to meet these increased standards. Growers will need technical assistance, development of best management practices, and possibly financial help to meet these challenges.


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An interview with ODA Director Katy Coba

What is unique about the Oregon Department of Agriculture?

We clearly have a very diverse set of programs, impacting a wide variety of Oregonians. Our three-fold mission—consumer protection and food safety, natural resource protection, and agricultural market development—is part of a very broad program base in this agency. Even our regular customers don’t always fully realize how diverse this agency is and how many people it touches. We reach every Oregonian one way or another.

 

What does this agency stand for, believe in, and value?

The backbone of our agency is our employees. They are the ones that deliver our services and interact with our customers. I’m very proud of our ODA employees, particularly given the very challenging environment they work in right now. They continue to deliver and do the best they can, often with limited resources. We have expertise in this agency. We are problem solvers. The way we deliver our services reflects our values in terms of being open and honest. Our number one goal is to figure out how to help our customers, even in our regulatory programs. How can we help? How can we educate? How can we get people into compliance? Our employees treat Oregonians the way that we all want to be treated.

 

Looking back at the past bienni​um, what challenges and opportunities stand out to you?

Two years ago, we were in the midst of a very severe recession that impacted everyone, including the agriculture industry. We had agricultural sectors that were losing money hand over fist and concerned about whether they were going to be in business the next day. I’m so proud of the way our employees were sensitive during that difficult time. In general, farmers and ranchers have come out of the recession. We saw a record farmgate value at $5.3 billion in 2011. So there has been a rebound in the industry, a lot of positive things are happening. I think farmers and ranchers are probably feeling a lot better than they did a couple of years ago. ODA’s programs are still very important—just as they were two years ago. The improved economy makes it easier for all of us to work together and achieve the outcomes we are trying to achieve for all of our programs. That’s definitely a very positive thing. The staff’s ability to work with our ag constituents is a little easier.

 

How has ODA adapted to keep up with new demands and fiscal reality?

We have gone through some internal reorganization, but nothing should change when it comes to serving our customers. How we are structured organizationally should not be an issue. Customers shouldn’t have to know which “division” or “program area” they have to deal with in order to find what they need. We’ve come to the realization that with the increasing complexity of the issues we deal with, with the crossover that takes place within our programs, and the fact that we want to continue to make our agency very easy to access for our customers, the organizational structure should not matter. What should matter is ease of finding where customers need to go in our agency. That is really driven by our programs. So we have stepped back and determined that we need to emphasize our programs. It makes more sense for our customers. That’s where everything happens anyway. The face that we show to the public is through our programs. There is no change in the type or quality of service our customers receive. The goal is to always improve the service we provide even when we are faced with limited resources. How can we continue to optimize the services we deliver while, at the same time, deal with limited resources? We hope through our reorganization we can gain some efficiency.

 

Are you optimistic about the next biennium?

Oh yes. I think the industry will continue to grow. Its connection with the average Oregonian is getting stronger. The interest in where food comes from and how it is grown is good for the future of Oregon agriculture. We need to do everything we can to support the industry so it can expand and be successful. On the flip side, I don’t see ODA getting more resources to deliver the programs we have. Our challenge is that we are still faced with resource limitations but want to continue to match the growth of the industry with our delivery of services, and maintain excellence in customer service. I’m confident we can do that.​


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Administration and Support Services

Introduction

Administration and Support Services manages the executive functions of the agency and provides related business, accounting, and technical support for agency programs and customers. This program area provides the core infrastructure for daily business operations of agency programs and also works closely with the agricultural and ranching community to assist the industry.

 

Director’s Off​ice

What we do

  • Provide executive oversight of all ODA functions while working with the Governor’s Office, legislature, other state/federal agencies, and agricultural/consumer groups to carry out the state’s agricultural policies.
  • Advocate for agriculture and educate Oregonians on its importance through speaking opportunities, publications, media relations, and other communication avenues.
  • Provide administrative support for the State Board of Agriculture.
  • Provide technical assistance to farmers as well as local, regional, and state governments on land use proposals.
  • Conduct research, publish white papers and reports on specific topics, and deliver presentations to various interested parties. Oversee special grants or projects.
  • Attend meetings and represent ODA on various task forces and work groups, including the Farmworker Housing Taskforce, the Columbia River Irrigation Work Group, the Cottonwood Canyon Oregon Solutions, No Child Left Inside Environmental Literacy Work Group, and the Oregon Agriculture in the Classroom Board.
  • Provide oversight and leadership for the Oregon Farm Mediation Program, making dispute resolution services available across Oregon for situations where at least one of the parties is a farmer or rancher. Issues may include nuisance concerns, trespass, boundary issues, contract disputes, labor or pay issues, or family farm transfer.
  • Create and maintain web pages on grants and financial assistance to growers; risk management resources for producers; youth tractor training programs; farm internship programs; beginning and small farm resources.

 

Major accomplishments

  • Increased Oregonians’ understanding and appreciation of agriculture’s importance to the state economy and environment through speeches, appearances, and media opportunities featuring Director Coba and other key agency officials.
  • Promoted Oregon agricultural products in key export markets as part of overseas trade missions involving the director and/or assistant directors. This included highly successful Governor’s Trade Missions in Asia during both 2011 and 2012.
  • Coordinated agency-wide responses to emergency situations, including critical food safety recalls and natural disaster events.
  • Provided technical expertise on a variety of land use policy issues affecting agricultural lands including urban growth management, aggregate mining, the siting of energy facilities, public parks, irrigation reservoirs, and commercial and agri-tourism activities on agricultural land.
  • Provided analysis of the agricultural capabilities of lands related to use of irrigation.
  • Provided analysis on numerous proposals dealing with the individual siting of a variety of land uses on agricultural lands and the rezoning of agricultural lands for nonfarm and urban uses.
  • Updated the report: Comprehensive Valuation of Agriculture Lands—http://oregon.gov/ODA/pages/do_reports_land.aspx; provided staff writing for the Board of Agriculture report to the legislature: http://oregon.gov/ODA/pages/pub_bd_rpt.aspx
  • Received over 100 inquiries about farm-related disputes; provided information about mediation and other options. Handled 27 mediation requests, of which 15 proceeded through mediation by voluntary agreement of the parties to participate. Agreement or settlement rate of 88 percent was achieved for these cases.
  • Initiated a Central Oregon water dispute program for users of shared ditches. Irrigation districts in Central Oregon historically delivered water to farmers who irrigated large acreages.
  • http://oregon.gov/ODA/docs/pdf/waterdispute.pdf
  • Administered the Aquaculture Feed Assistance Grant: This project reimbursed aquaculture producers for feed costs that had escalated more than 25 percent in 2008 over the prior five year average. A similar grant with non-ARRA funds was allocated in January 2011 to cover feed cost increases in 2009.

 

Goals​​

  • Provide executive leadership and management of the agency’s overall program of work.
  • Continue to work collaboratively with Oregon natural resource agencies to optimize opportunities for coordination of work as well as sharing of data and information.
  • Provide timely and cost-effective dispute resolution services for growers and land owners around the state.
  • Maintain websites to provide helpful, informative, and timely information that assists growers, new and established.
  • Administer special projects and grants as requested by directors.
  • Represent ODA and agriculture’s perspective on appropriate work groups and task forces to achieve meaningful and collaborative outcomes.
  • Promote agriculture literacy and learning through Agriculture in the Classroom, the No Child Left Inside initiative, and presentations to schools and various community organizations.
  • Continue to participate in regional planning activities taking place in southern Oregon.
  • Continue to monitor the application of Oregon’s “Right-to-Farm” law.

 

Informa​tion Office

What we do

  • Serve as the agency’s first point of contact for external customers.
  • Provide communications and information services and assistance to all ODA programs.
  • Provide media relations and public information services, including publications and other informational/educational materials.
  • Maintain digital image/video library for agency and public.
  • Coordinate ODA’s website and social media services while providing assistance to agency staff.

 

Major acc​omplishments

  • Responded to more than 1,000 requests by media for interviews and information, and more than 12,000 telephone or email requests for information by the public in 2011-2012.
  • Produced numerous publications, including news releases, ODA’s Story of the Week, the Oregon Agriculture Quarterly, Oregon Agripedia, State Board of Agriculture Report, and assisted with various ODA program-specific publications. All publications were made available in electronic form and published on the ODA website.
  • Enhanced and improved the ODA website by creating easier navigation and streamlined content.
  • Began using the state open-government database (data.oregon.gov) to post information available to the public. Information from these public datasets can be embedded in a variety of formats in the ODA website and updated instantly. Some examples include the public meeting calendar and weed free forage providers.
  • Continued to develop social media tools to enhance ODA’s communications reach and delivery through Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and Flickr.

 

​Goals

  • Transition successfully into a new web content management system that will allow ODA to continue upgrading its website.
  • Increase agency-wide use of social media tools.
  • Increase public access to agency information available on Data.gov.

 

Administrative Services

What we do

  • Provide support for all of the department’s various programs in areas of financial management, licensing, contracts and procurement, human resources, and computer information systems. Through department programs, the administrative services interacts with all of ODA’s diverse customer base.
  • Make payments for all goods and services purchased by the department as well as reimbursements for expenses; coordinate, train, and oversee compliance with travel rules; administer Small Purchase Order Transaction System (SPOTS) card program; receive, record, and deposit all revenue collected by the department; prepare monthly and annual financial statements; coordinate and monitor federal contracts and grants; monitor expenditures for appropriateness with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, laws, regulations, Department of Justice opinions, and Secretary of State Audit comments.
  • Assist Director’s Office in the development and control of the department’s biennial budget; prepare quarterly allotments; provide expenditure and cash flow information; prepare fiscal impact analyses of proposed legislation; analyze fund balances and prepare forecasts.
  • Provide centralized department licensing functions, including auditing of license applications, issuing of license renewals and certificates, and monitoring license activities.
  • Develop, establish, and administer department contracts; act as central procurement authority for the department; provide building maintenance and fleet management.
  • Prepare monthly payroll; process health, dental, life and disability insurance applications in addition to other voluntary deductions.
  • Coordinate employee training, recruitment, hiring, job classifications, diversity management, and labor relations.
  • Maintain department’s computer infrastructure including hardware and software that comprises the department’s network; deploy, configure, maintain, and monitor network equipment; develop and support custom business applications; provide helpdesk service and support.

 

Major accomplishments

  • Received state certification to a member of procurement staff.
  • Continued streamlining fleet and procurement processes.
  • Worked with Specialty Crop Grant coordinator and financial analyst to standardize the Specialty Crop Grant Agreement template for use by all agency programs.
  • Implemented agency wide travel policy to ensure consistency across programs.
  • Upgraded accounting module for processing incoming payments related to license fees and accounts receivable.
  • Worked with US Bank and Oregon Treasury to explore options to further streamline processes related to collecting fee revenue.

 

Goals

  • Provide timely and accurate payments to vendors for goods and services provided, and reimbursements to employees and commission members.
  • Establish timely and accurate recording of revenue including licensing fees and other fees-for-service.
  • Provide prompt and accurate license issuance.
  • Comply with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, laws, regulations, state and department policies.
  • Continue to achieve annual State Controller Gold Star Certificates that are awarded to agencies that meet requirements related to timeliness, accuracy, completeness, communication of important issues, and training attendance as part of the state’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.​


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Internal Services and Consumer Protection Programs

Introduction​

The Internal Services and Consumer Protection (ISCP) Program Area provides consumer protection, ensures fair competition among businesses, and facilitates interstate commerce and international trade. This is done by: ensuring the accuracy, validity, uniformity, and confidence in Oregon’s Commercial Weighing System; ensuring that motor fuels sold in Oregon meet national standards for quality; providing safe, accurate, timely, and cost-effecient laboratory analysis and technical support to ODA regulatory enforcement programs and other local, state and federal agencies, and providing analytical and technical support for moving value added food products to domestic and foreign markets. The ISCP Program Area also administers the Wolf Depredation Compensation Financial Assistance Grant and the Egg-Laying Hen Cage/Space Compliance programs.

 

Weights and Measures Program

What we d​o

  • Act as an impartial third-party overseeing the commercial marketplace to ensure equity in transactions for both the buyer and seller while, at the same time, working to prevent and eliminate fraud and other deceptive and misleading practices.
  • Examine and certify approximately 55,000 commercially-used weighing and measuring devices for accuracy and compliance. This includes conducting annual performance tests on more than 28,000 retail motor fuel dispensers in Oregon. These devices are licensed and examined for accuracy and suitability each year by 18 field inspectors and two field supervisors.
  • Respond to and investigate complaints involving discrepancies in weighing and measuring devices.
  • Provide Oregon industries the highest level of precision calibration available, through the Metrology Laboratory. The lab maintains custody of the state’s mass and volumetric standards for measurement which are used to; 1) Provide precision calibration and traceability for over 2,700 standards used in the field by Weights and Measures inspectors (in order to make sure that the tools used to check weighing and measuring devices for accuracy are, themselves accurate); 2) Provide precision calibration services to over 141 private high technology, manufacturing, and production firms each year.
  • Act as the state’s technical experts and provide technical assistance to businesses in the proper selection and use of weighing and measuring equipment by interpreting NIST Handbook 44 and collecting and distributing information on the continuing advancement of commercial measurement technology.
  • Represent Oregon at the National Conference on Weights and Measures each year in which laws and regulations, technical codes for weighing and measuring devices used in commerce, test methods, enforcement procedures, and administrative guidelines are developed and adopted by federal, state, county, and city weights and measures regulatory agencies within the United States in the interest of promoting uniformity of requirements and methods.

 

Major accomplishm​ents

  • Inspected 51,539 (94 percent) of the 54,243 total licensed weighing and measuring devices in Oregon in 2011. For 2012, it is estimated that 49,000 (91 percent) of the 54,263 total licensed weighing and measuring devices will have been examined. (Reduction for 2012 is due to vacant positions). In 2011, these devices were used to weigh or measure approximately $97 billion dollars of goods and products in Oregon.
  • Determined that approximately 86 percent of the weighing and measuring devices examined were found in compliance with national standards in 2011-12.
  • Received, investigated and resolved approximately 254 complaints regarding weighing and measuring discrepancies in 2011-12.
  • For 2011, examined a total of 28,794 retail motor fuel dispensers with 2,097 (7.3 percent) being rejected and an additional 1,367 (4.5 percent) needing onsite corrective action. For 2012 (through October), inspectors have examined 24,989 retail motor fuel dispensers with 1,677 (6.7 percent) being rejected and another 1,259 (4.8 percent) needing corrective action. These 28,700 retail motor fuel dispensers are used to measure an estimated $8 billion of gasoline and diesel fuel that is sold to Oregon consumers each year.
  • Collaborated with the agricultural industry (farming, ranching, processing, wholesale, and retail) to certify weighing and measuring devices, helping to accurately weigh $5.3 billion of agricultural production for 2011.
  • Collaborated with Oregon’s Farmers Market Association (164 markets statewide) in certifying scales which accurately weighed an estimated $50 million of Oregon’s farm sales.
  • Collaborated with Oregon’s Seafood Processors in certifying weighing and measuring systems that helped accurately weigh 270 million pounds of seafood delivered to Oregon ports in 2011, for a harvest value of $152 million.
  • Collaborated with the Port of Portland in certifying continuous weighing systems in Terminals 4 and 5, assisting with the accurate weighing and measuring of nearly 24 million tons of cargo that passes through the marine terminals in the Portland Harbor each year.
  • Received an outstanding third-party assessment for the Metrology Laboratory from the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). After thoroughly checking the technical capabilities of the lab and its actual performance, the audit reaffirmed that ODA’s Metrology Laboratory is one of the best in the country. ODA’s Metrology Laboratory is one of just eight state mass laboratories nationwide currently NVLAP accredited to Echelon I mass calibration designation, permitting the highest precision available as required by today’s high technology business sector. This accreditation helps Oregon’s manufacturing and production industries meet the international marketplace’s ISO 9000 requirements and strengthens their competitiveness.
  • Sustained a gold buying compliance project designed to ensure pawn shops, jewelry stores, and other businesses operate licensed and legal-for-trade scales for transactions involving gold.

 

Go​als

  • Ensure consumer and business protection and equity in Oregon’s marketplace by examining and certifying weighing and measuring devices for accuracy.
  • Respond to and investigate complaints of discrepancies in weighing and measuring devices in a professional, respectful, and timely manner.
  • Assist business and service companies in the proper selection of weighing and measuring equipment by providing information on the continuing advancement of commercial measurement technology.
  • Provide the highest level of metrology services available to Oregon’s key service, manufacturing, and production industries in order to help them meet ISO 9000 quality certification requirements.
  • Achieve efficiencies in service delivery through innovation in information technology, public media, specialized equipment, and personnel management.


Motor Fuel Quality

What we do

  • Ensure that the 2.1 billion gallons of motor vehicle gasoline, diesel, and biofuels sold in Oregon each year meet national standards for quality and Oregon’s Renewable Fuel Standards (10 percent ethanol in gasoline and 5 percent biodiesel in diesel fuel).
  • Receive, respond to, and investigate complaints regarding motor fuel quality.
  • Screen samples of gasoline for octane levels to make sure Oregon motorists are receiving the correct octane level in the fuel they purchase.
  • Inspect fuel storage tanks for water and other contaminants and pull samples of gasoline, diesel, and biofuels to be tested by internal and external laboratories for national specification requirements.
  • Work with industry representatives, retailers, and new businesses that are developing cutting-edge renewable fuel technology in order to regulate and enforce Oregon’s Renewable Fuel Standard.

 

Major accomplish​ments

  • Screened 7,659 motor fuel samples in 2011-12 (unleaded, mid-grade, and premium) from across the state for octane and visual contamination with 61 samples failing (99.2 percent compliance).
  • Examined 12,095 fuel storage tanks in 2011-12 for visual contamination and excessive water with 87 tanks showing signs of excessive water and being placed out of service until corrected (99.3 percent compliance).
  • Pulled 144 official fuel samples from across the state in 2011-12 to be tested at a private laboratory for national specification compliance.
  • Successfully implemented the 5 percent biodiesel standard as part of Oregon’s Renewable Fuel Standard for diesel fuel. This included implementing the winter exemption to allow additives to diesel fuel for winterization purposes from October 1 through February 28, without violating the 5 percent biodiesel standard.
  • Responded, investigated, and dispositioned 58 consumer complaints for motor fuel quality.

 

Goals​

  • Ensure consumer confidence in the quality of motor fuels (including biofuels) sold in Oregon.
  • Respond to and investigate motor fuel quality complaints in a professional, respectful, and timely manner.
  • Work closely with industry representatives, retailers, and emerging businesses in the realm of biofuels, renewable energies, and clean technologies in order to add resilience and certainty to the industry, while continuing to implement, regulate and enforce Oregon’s Renewable Fuel Standard.


Labora​tory services

What ​we do

  • Provides organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, and microbiological testing services for ODA’s regulatory enforcement programs, as well as many private industries and governmental programs.
  • Provide analysis and technical support to ODA’s Fertilizer and Pesticide Enforcement Programs in efforts towards reducing exposure to toxics and potential impacts on human health and the environment.
  • Provide analysis and technical support to ODA’s Confined Animal Feedlot Operation Program (CAFO) in efforts for achieving water quality on agricultural lands.
  • Provide analytical and technical support that helps facilitate the exporting of Oregon agricultural products to other domestic and foreign markets.
  • Provide analyses of poultry and poultry products for USDA.
  • Provide consumer protection by conducting testing under the Interstate Milk Shippers Program which allows milk and milk products to move across state lines.
  • Conduct testing under the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference’s National Shellfish Program in which waters are constantly monitored for bacteria levels. This allows shellfish harvested in Oregon’s waters to be sold and moved across state lines.
  • Serve in the Food Emergency Response Network (FERN), which is activated when a food borne emergency occurs to help identify the causative agent, source, and assure recovery.
  • Provide organic pesticide residue analyses for DEQ Ground Water Program.
  • Provide laboratory services for the EPA, Department of Environmental Quality, Forestry Department, and other state and federal agencies.

 

Major accom​plishments

  • Provided both internal and external customers in 2011-12 with timely and effective analytical response by conducting 50,435 tests on 11,308 samples ranging from dairy, CAFO, food, fertilizer, pesticide baywater, shellfish, food exports, and ground water.
  • Increased analyst training opportunities for staff (GC-QQQ training, ISO 17025 introduction, marine toxins workshop, etc.)
  • Received FDA Cooperative Agreement grant for ISO Laboratory Accreditation.
  • Completed Manufactured Regulatory Food Safety Program Standard work for laboratory accreditation.
  • Established process for increasing infrastructure support within the lab by acquiring new analytical equipment and a new Lab Information Management System (LIMS)

 

Go​als

  • Support ODA’s regulatory programs by providing safe, accurate, timely, and cost-effective pesticide, chemical, and microbiological analysis and technical support to assure compliance with state laws for Food Safety and Natural Resource Programs.
  • Through the Export Certification Program, continue to help Oregon agricultural producers access markets outside of Oregon (domestic and international), thereby increasing the competitiveness of Oregon products within the agricultural and food products industries.
  • Purchase and implement a Lab Information Management System (LIMS) that will allow the lab to offer real-time access for customers to check on their test and sample results, among other benefits.
  • Reduce the time from receipt of a sample into the laboratory to when the report is released to the client.
  • Work towards ISO certification, enhanced quality controls, performance and system audits, validation, and reporting.
  • Ensure that lab testing, results, and the issuing of certificates are provided in a professional, respectful, timely, and responsive way.

 

Special ​programs

What w​e do

  • Administer ODA’s Wolf Depredation Compensation and Financial Assistance Grant Program, using money from the Wolf Management Compensation and Proactive Trust Fund. ODA provides pass-through grants to counties to establish and implement county wolf depredation compensation programs of their own, under which compensation can be paid to persons for livestock or working dogs killed or injured due to wolf depredation. Financial assistance can also be provided to persons who implement livestock management and/or nonlethal wolf deterrent techniques designed to discourage wolf depredation of livestock. This program supports the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan by proactively minimizing wolf-livestock conflicts and assisting livestock producers who experience wolf-related livestock losses.
  • Administer ODA’s Egg-Laying Hen Enclosure Compliance Program (Senate Bill 805) which regulates the manner in which egg-laying hens may be confined in an enclosure. Commercial farm owners or operators engaged in the commercial production of eggs or egg products in Oregon that have caged egg-laying hens must provide ODA with a “Farm Business Plan” describing their intended compliance with Oregon laws and rules. Also, all distibutors of eggs or egg products into or within Oregon (other than the retail end-users of shell eggs) in which the eggs or egg products originated from hens confined in an enclosure during the production of the egg, must provide documentation to ODA showing that the eggs or egg-products they distributed in Oregon are from hens confined in an enclosure that was compliant with Oregon laws and rules. Any Oregon purchaser of eggs or egg products (other than the retail end-user of shell eggs) must maintain a three year record of receipts or other documentation identifying every distributor from whom they received eggs or egg products.

 

Major accomplishme​nts

  • Approved $82,970 in funding appropriated by the 2011 State Legislature to eight counties east of the Cascade Mountains for actual livestock losses caused by wolves and for proactive efforts to prevent wolf impacts on livestock.
  • Adopted an administrative rule dealing with the management of egg-laying hens housed in cages and the distribution of eggs and egg products within Oregon. The rule provides clarity on standards for space that must be met for egg-laying hens in cage as well as other important components to Oregon’s caged hen law adopted by the 2011 State Legislature.


​Goals

  • Secure continued funding by the 2013 Oregon Legislature for the wolf depredation compensation grant program, as wolf depredation is on the increase.
  • Work towards acquiring farm business plans from commercial egg producers and documentation from all egg distributors in Oregon in compliance with the egg-laying hen space compliance laws and rules.​


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Food Safety and Animal Health Programs

Intro​duction

The Food Safety and Animal Health Program Area (FSAH): inspects all facets of Oregon’s food distribution system (except restaurants) to ensure food is safe for consumption; protects and maintains animal health; and ensures animal feeds meet nutritional and labeling standards. Specifically, FSAH works to: (1) assure a safe, wholesome, properly labeled and protected food supply; (2) ensure that feed for livestock and animals is wholesome and unadulterated; and (3) prevent, control, and eliminate diseases harmful to humans and livestock. FSAH programs are conducted statewide, affect the state’s food and livestock production and distribution systems, and impact all Oregon consumers.

In the food safety portion of the program area, nearly 7,000 food establishments in Oregon are licensed and inspected. Programs respond to food safety issues to protect the public while working with the food industry through education and collaboration to prevent unhealthy or unsafe conditions in the food supply.

In the animal heath portion of the program area, Oregon’s livestock industries and their markets are protected through programs that test for, control, and eradicate animal disease, including those transmissible to humans, and through programs that regulate the movement of livestock and other animals.

FSAH administers 10 separate statutes that regulate food, feed, and animal health industries. To achieve its goals, FSAH works with Oregon industries, local governments, neighboring states, and federal agencies.

 

​Animal Health Program

What we do

  • Work with veterinarians throughout Oregon to prevent, detect, control, and eradicate animal diseases.
  • Complete several thousand veterinary diagnostic tests every year, through the Animal Health Laboratory, to help confirm Oregon livestock’s health status and/or absence of certain diseases.
  • Issue import permits and process Certificates of Veterinary Inspection required for nearly all animals entering the state to verify these animals meet Oregon’s import requirements for animal health.
  • Monitor animal movement, trace disease outbreaks, and employ essential control measures directed toward protecting Oregon’s animals and public.
  • Cooperate with other agencies and organizations to control diseases, including USDA, Oregon State University, state public health officials, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Oregon Veterinary Medical Association.

 

Major accomplish​ments

  • Retained Oregon’s classification this past biennium as “free” from brucellosis, tuberculosis, pseudorabies, and pullorum-typhoid, diseases which affect cattle, swine, and poultry respectively. “Free” status is a significant economic enhancement and allows maximum freedom of interstate and international movement for animals and animal products. This high ranking was accomplished through cooperation with other agencies and organizations, including but not limited to: Oregon State University, state Public Health officials, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Veterinary Medical Association, the FDA for drug residue concerns, animal owner and producer groups for various species of animals, practicing veterinarians, law enforcement agencies, and USDA’s animal disease control programs.
  • Completed 52,968 tests by the Animal Health Laboratory in 2011 and expect to meet or exceed that number in 2012.
  • Provided surveillance for avian influenza in commercial birds and one live bird market in the state.
  • Responded to cases of livestock infected by West Nile Virus, an outbreak of equine infectious herpes, and a case of anthrax affecting a herd in Klamath County. The State Veterinarian was on scene at Fort Klamath to help contain the rare case of anthrax and to encourage area livestock owners to maintain anthrax vaccinations for their herds, since anthrax occurs naturally in the soil in many parts of Klamath County. 
  • Conducted disaster and disease emergency response training and drills with the Oregon Veterinary Emergency Response Team. This training and these drills increase the preparedness of Oregon Deputy State Veterinarians to assist ODA in a large scale disease response effort.

 

Goal​s

  • Monitor and respond to important animal and zoonotic pathogens associated with livestock production operations.
  • Maintain Oregon’s disease free status in state-federal cooperative disease control programs including avian influenza, brucellosis, and bovine tuberculosis.
  • Continue training and exercises for ODA staff and Oregon Deputy State Veterinarians to assure a rapid, efficient and successful response to any disease threat to our livestock industries.
  • Cooperate closely with intra- and inter-agency partners for efficient use of personnel and valuable state resources. Aggressively pursue long term strategies to maintain disease-free animals, ensure a wholesome food supply, and best serve the livestock industries and people of Oregon.

 

Animal Feeds Pr​ogram

What w​e do

  • Administer Oregon’s commercial feed laws, which apply to all commercial manufacturing and distribution activities involving feed, feed ingredients, and feed additives for all animals, including livestock, aquaculture, pets, and specialty animals.
  • License persons manufacturing and/or distributing commercial feed in or into Oregon, and regulate package labeling.
  • Register and test commercial feed products to confirm that animal feed is safe, meets nutritional guarantees, and is in compliance with state and federal regulations.
  • Help FDA regulate feed components and enforce its ban on ruminant protein in ruminant feed.

 

Major acco​mplishments

  • Updated administrative rules to mirror federal law on BSE prevention and Good Manufacturing Practices.
  • Initiated a requirement that lot numbers and manufacturers’ phone numbers appear on all feed labels in order to expedite reporting and to facilitate recalls.
  • Collaborated with dairy and swine industries to update customs labels to include formula and guaranteed nutrients information in an effort to reduce catastrophic events caused when the wrong feed is delivered.
  • Conducted heavy metal analysis on a random sampling of all feed samples taken. The heavy metal analysis proved beneficial during the 2012 Arsenic investigations in Klamath County. As a result of the heavy metal analysis, ODA already knew that unsafe levels of heavy metals were not present in animal feeds distributed in the Klamath area.
  • Continued to unify the efforts of local, state, and federal agencies to facilitate a rapid and unified government response to illness outbreaks associated with food and feed products.

 

Go​als

  • Continue development of local, state, and federal partnerships.
  • Reduce the number of packaging violations on animal feeds distributed in Oregon.
  • Assist Oregon’s feed industry to implement and comply with the first requirement of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) to the feed industry--developing preventative controls. Developing preventative controls will require feed mills to identify potential hazards and establish a written plan to mitigate the hazards.

 

Animal Identificatio​n Program

What ​we do

  • Prevent livestock theft by denying a market for stolen animals through recording of brands and inspection of animals.
  • Record more than 11,000 livestock brands and standardize livestock ownership markings to verify ownership, deter theft, help track disease outbreaks, and help return lost or estray animals to their owners.
  • Inspect more than 1 million cattle and horses, every year—when they leave the state or when there is a change of ownership. Brand inspections assure the fair and honest marketing of animals.
  • Assist local and state law enforcement in livestock theft investigations.

 

Major accompl​ishments

  • Utilized a cutting-edge Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) program, in close collaboration with the Animal Health Program, for tracking livestock and livestock disease in Oregon. Oregon’s ADT uses a web-based software program to link brand inspection and animal health permit databases, allowing for swift and efficient tracing of market animals in the event of disease. USDA has modeled its national Disease Traceability Program on Oregon’s ADT, and is currently encouraging other livestock states to use Oregon’s program.
  • Tested the ADT system in the spring of 2012, and demonstrated that the system met or exceeded all preliminary traceability performance standards set by USDA.
  • Assisted ranchers in identifying immediate and long-term grazing options to help with livestock that will be displaced for two years as a result of public grazing lands having been destroyed by wildfires.

 

G​oals

  • Educate the cattle industry on the use of ODA pasture permits to facilitate the customary, seasonal interstate movement of livestock without having to obtain regulatory certificates.
  • Identify and develop opportunities for brand inspectors to assist with the Animal Health Program’s regulatory requirements.
  • Identify feasible methods to provide investigatory services to the livestock industry to deter the unlawful interstate movement of livestock and to prevent livestock theft.

 

Food: Manufacturing and Re​tail Safety Program

What​ we do 

  • Inspect establishments engaged in food manufacturing, baked-good production, and retail food sales by focusing on risk factors such as employee hygiene, time and temperature controls, and food sources.
  • Perform annual equipment testing and calibration for food manufacturers.
  • Conduct plan review and provide technical support for food establishments that have yet to become licensed, including label review and comment. 
  • Offer food safety expertise and oversight to all food establishments (excluding restaurants, which are handled by Public Health Division, and meat slaughtering/processing plants, which are handled by USDA).
  • Provide licenses for retail food establishments (grocery stores), food manufacturers, food warehouses, bakeries, non-alcoholic beverage plants, and domestic kitchens.
  • Respond to foodborne illness outbreaks. Trace back the distribution of subject of the outbreak and investigate the production and handling of the food to establish and eliminate the source of the contamination.
  • Provide certification services for Oregon food producers that ship products to foreign markets. Foreign markets do not allow the importation of U.S. products without a health certificate specifically attesting that: the food processor (exporter) is licensed; that its food processes meet all health, safety, and legal requirements; and that its food is freely distributed in the US.

 

Major ​accomplishments

  • Conducted a recall involving fresh Oregon strawberries contaminated by E. coli O157:H7—the first U.S. recall of adulterated fresh strawberries. The contaminated strawberries sickened 15 people, required the hospitalization of seven others, and contributed to the death of one elderly person who had been undergoing medical treatments for issues not associated with E. coli poisoning. ODA’s collaboration with Oregon Public Health, resulted in ODA being able to account for nearly all of the potentially contaminated berries. Even so, tracing and identifying the contaminated berries was extremely difficult since the strawberries had been distributed to numerous farmers’ markets, farm stands, and roadside stands in Oregon and Washington.
  • At the request of Oregon’s berry commissions, the Food Safety Program worked with other ODA programs, the State of California, and the berry commissions in Washington and California to develop and provide training and instruction on food safety practices to berry farmers and their workers. Trainings, made available in both English and Spanish, took place at six different farm locations throughout the Willamette Valley.
  • Protected more than 250 jobs in Roseburg by finding and eliminating a dangerous pathogen on milk containers used by one of the state’s largest dairy plants.
  • Spared Oregon’s shellfish industry an industry-wide closure as a result of inspectors pinpointing and eliminating the source of norovirus (the number one cause of foodborne illness in the US) in Oregon oysters one day before the state’s largest seafood and wine festival.
  • Worked to lead the nation in the implementation of the Manufactured Food Regulatory Program Standards (MFRPS), the national standard for food manufacturing administered by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which promotes healthy, safe, and successful businesses in Oregon’s food industry. Oregon’s compliance with MFRPS ensures that industry receives training on national standards and expectations. It demands that industry consistently conforms to national standards, making Oregon’s products competitive in the national and international markets. It also creates a communication network between industries and their federal, state, and local regulatory partners.
  • Developed the state’s first unified Food Code with the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) which promotes the consistent application of the state’s food safety laws in all state food establishments. Oregon’s first unified Food Code also reduces duplication of efforts and services between the department and the Oregon Health Authority.
  • Partnered with industry and the state legislature to develop new, affordable business opportunities for Oregon’s small farms and processors. The Farm-direct Bill (HB 2336) passed by the 2011 Legislature provides small entrepreneurs an opportunity to grow, process and sell their products without regulatory oversight or license fees.

 

Goa​ls

  • Continue the implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Oregon’s food safety program will need to establish and maintain additional requirements to meet the newly mandated food safety standards. The first of the new FSMA regulations to reach the states are expected to be: Preventive Controls (for human and animal food production), Produce Safety, and Foreign Supplier Verification (of regulatory compliance).
  • Excel in the implementation of FDA’s Manufactured Food Regulatory Program Standards.
  • Develop a consumer education program in conjunction with local, state, and federal food safety partners (Partnership For Food Protection).
  • Develop and implement a new database system that allows for electronic creation and maintenance of: validation of licenses, inspection reports, plan reviews, consumer complaints, compliance history, complex processes, foreign export, and other important food safety documentation.

 

Food: Dairy, M​eat, and Egg Programs

What w​e do

  • Inspect dairy farms twice a year and dairy plants four times a year to ensure consumers receive safe and wholesome fluid milk and milk products.
  • Perform inspections, sampling, and equipment checks in accordance with the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance, allowing fluid milk and milk products to be sold in other states. Similarly, manufacturing grade products, such as powdered milk, are held to similar federal requirements.
  • Regulate and inspect dairy products processing plants, artisan cheese processors, and sheep and goat establishments.
  • Inspect and oversee mobile and custom meat slaughtering establishments, retail markets, and pet food manufacturers. The program also visits USDA-inspected meat plants annually to confirm federal inspectors are on site.
  • Provide monthly grading services for Oregon egg processors and egg grading in retail food establishments every four years. Eggs are the only food type for which FSD provides quality assurance rather than safety control.

 

Major accomplishme​nts

  • Adopted the 2009 version of pasteurized milk ordinance to equalize Oregon’s regulatory practices with current federal standards.
  • Implemented the Oregon legislature’s 1,000 bird poultry slaughter exemption (HB2872) to facilitate the entry of new, entrepreneurial business into the slaughter industry.

 

Go​als

  • Standardize additional dairy inspectors.
  • Participate in national regulatory conferences and committees.
  • Assist Oregon dairy farmers to comply with newly established, somatic cell count requirements.
  • Maintain egg quality and increase egg inspections.
  • Help the beneficiaries of HB2872 meet all required food safety standards.

 

Food: Seafood and Shellfish Pr​ogram

What​ we do

  • Monitor fecal coliform and water quality parameters at established stations in each of Oregon’s classified shellfish harvesting areas.
  • Provide highly technical scientific measurements and evaluations of shellfish growing waters and harvested meats in cooperation with FDA and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW).
  • Develop and monitor management plans specific to each growing area that detail toxin limits and water conditions essential for safe shellfish.
  • Collect samples and conduct tests of shellfish to determine the presence of marine toxins such as domoic acid or paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). These toxins can cause severe illness or even death in humans.
  • Issue closures for commercial and recreational harvesters as needed.
  • Review Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) programs and processes required of seafood processors to prevent food-borne illness.
  • Identify pollution sources and other factors that render the state’s shellfish resources unfit for human consumption. Work with local officials, other state agencies, environmental organizations, and members of the public to eliminate pollution sources, especially those that limit opportunities for shellfish harvesting.
  • Inform and educate the public about the sanitary quality of the waters of the state and shellfish resources, as well as potential health risks associated with consuming shellfish.

 

Major accomplishm​ents

  • Adopted the 2010 National Shellfish Sanitation Program Standards (NSSP).
  • Updated Oregon administrative rules to be in compliance with the new NSSP regulations.
  • Received FDA audit of Oregon’s Shellfish Program, the Program Element Evaluation Review, which found Oregon in compliance.
  • Standardized one new shellfish inspector.
  • Classified all of the Umpqua River as eligible for interstate shipment of shellfish.

 

Go​als

  • Train a shellfish inspector to become a standardized shellfish officer with the FDA.
  • Implement the new Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference requirement of requiring oyster distributers to cool product to 50 degrees F. within 10 hours of harvest.
  • Train additional commercial and recreational personnel in the Salem area.
  • Work with the industry to establish a federally-recognized plan for Clatsop beaches that would make the area eligible for interstate shipment of shellfish.​


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Market Access and Certification Programs

Introduction 

The Market Access and Certification Program Area assists Oregon’s agricultural producers, processors and fishers in their efforts to successfully sell and ship products to local, national, and international markets. The marketing portion of the program area works to promote and create demand for Oregon agricultural products. The inspection and certification portion of the program area adds value by making products more marketable. It also provides services to facilitate product movement, and services that overcome trade barriers and technical constraints affecting agriculture. These programs reach rural and urban areas alike to create jobs and sustainable opportunities for the state’s multi-billion dollar agricultural sector.

 

​Certification services

​What we do

  • Provide third-party food safety inspections under USDA’s GAP/GHP Audit Verification Program to address microbial food safety hazards on the farm.
  • Provide Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) third-party inspections and certification through a partnership with NCSI Americas, Inc. These include: GlobalGAP, PrimusGFS and SQF for farms, handling operations and food processors.
  • Provide organic certification services under USDA’s National Organic Program for crop producers and handling operations.
  • Provide Maximum Residue Level Compliance certification through official sampling and analytical testing. Protocols are designed to detect specific pesticide residue or food pathogens in order to meet industry standards.
  • Provide customized Identity Preserved certification to a number of Oregon companies to verify and validate market features such as non-GMO status, traceability, security, etc.
  • Provide third party audit and inspection services to wine industry certification programs, including Low Input Viticulture and Enology (LIVE) for Oregon wineries as well as the Carbon Reduction Challenge (CRC).
  • Work cooperatively with public and private entities to provide verification and market access through certification services and the development of new voluntary certification programs with industry.

 

Major accomplish​ments

  • Through a partnership with USDA Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Korea’s Quarantine and Inspection Agency (QIA) and the Oregon Blueberry Commission, developed protocols to allow the shipment of fresh blueberries into South Korea. This protocol made Oregon the first state allowed to export fresh blueberries into that market. The Korea fresh blueberry protocol was extremely successful in its first season, 2012. Oregon ended the season having shipped almost 489,000 pounds of fresh blueberries to South Korea with nine certified Oregon packers approved to ship fruit. The fruit was well received and no technical issues were observed by plant quarantine or import officials in South Korea.
  • Certified almost 80,000 acres of fresh produce for Good Agricultural Practices/Good Handling Practices (GAP/GHP) in 2012, a program that continues to grow despite requests for more comprehensive certification services. In 2012, many USDA GAP/GHP audits were done in tandem with GFSI audits that farmers also need to meet retailer purchasing requirements. ODA was able to provide both services with one visit to the farm or handling facility in many cases, providing efficiencies for producers and saving travel and staff costs.
  • Provided auditing and certification of Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) benchmarked standards to 34 Oregon companies as part of our partnership agreement with NCSI Americas, Inc. These are voluntary certifications required by national and international retailers. Growth in this program has been exponential, especially in districts outside of the Willamette Valley, prompting ODA to station a certification specialist in Hood River to service the Hermiston, Milton-Freewater, and Hood River production areas more cost effective and efficiently. More growth is expected in 2013.
  • Provided outreach and farm food safety education to farmers interested in selling directly to institutions and schools. Provided an on-farm mock inspection as well as cost-share opportunities for those attending the event, which was funded with Specialty Crop Block Grant Program dollars. Both school and institutional purchasers and farmers attended the event, with information on accessing those markets provided along with food safety materials.
  • Provided a random pesticide residue sampling program for organic clients for the last two years, which is now becoming mandatory for all accredited certifying agents under the National Organic Program in 2013. This program helps protect consumers and the integrity of the organic label.
  • In partnership with Certified Onion, Inc. and the ODA’s laboratory services, provided official sampling, testing and certification on over 1 billion pounds of Treasure Valley onions annually since 2009. In 2012, this represented over $94 million of certified product in the marketplace. Since the program’s inception, there has not been a finding of pesticide residue over EPA tolerance on onions.

 

Go​als

  • Continue to provide high quality, cost-effective services to Oregon’s agricultural producers in a timely manner.
  • Provide leadership on innovative and solution-oriented services to meet market demands of Oregon producers.
  • Increase ability of customers to meet a greater number of market opportunities through customized service and validation.
  • Develop certification staff to provide expert technical assistance to industry and continue to provide leadership to other state departments of agriculture in providing innovative certification services.


Ship​ping Point Inspection Program

Wha​t we do

  • Provide services in response to the industry’s requests and needs. Services include a wide range and variety of inspections and certifications and are performed at ODA and customer facilities. These traditional inspections and certifications, ensure that fruit, vegetable, and nut crops meet regulatory, customer and marketplace standards.
  • Make available official third party verification programs for identity preserved products, food security audits, and audits of other practices at the request of industry.
  • Provide product and process training to the various segments of the industry, inspection and certification oversight as it relates to voluntary or mandatory inspection and certification programs.

 

Major acc​omplishments

  • Inspected nearly 4 billion pounds of produce for processing and 1.6 billion pounds of fresh fruits, vegetables and tree nuts in 2011. As of November 2012, the program already exceeded 2011’s volume.
  • Inspected and certified more than 385 million pounds of fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts for export to 58 countries in 2011, including nearly 21 million pounds of apples, 44 million pounds of hazelnuts, 73 million pounds of onions, 103 million pounds of pears, and 134 million pounds of potatoes. As of November, 2012 more than 374 million pounds of fresh fruits, vegetables and nuts have been inspected and exported.
  • Certified 948,382 tons of alfalfa and grass seed straw for export in 2011, and as of November 2012, 844,824 tons were certified, providing a cost effective alternative to field burning.
  • Opened a new, larger, and more conveniently located shipping point facility in Hermiston, which allows staff to perform a wide variety of inspections as well as store related equipment. In addition to housing district support staff, the building has the potential to serve other future departmental needs.
  • Employed new technology for third-party inspection work utilizing Apple iPads. The iPads have several advantages over laptop computers; they are about one-third the cost, more portable, have better durability, and are simpler to use.

 

Goa​ls

  • Develop and implement an inspection and certification scheme, as product requirements change due to the customer or the importing country, to continue to provide Oregon products entry into the marketplace.
  • Invest in technology to provide more real time information to our industry.
  • Look for efficiencies. Continue to partner with the industry to identify more efficient processes to reduce or maintain costs of the program.

 

Plant He​alth Program

What w​e do

  • Provide laboratory testing of seed and plant material for viruses, bacteria, fungi, and nematodes, and conduct field inspection services to meet interstate and international phytosanitary requirements.
  • Conduct surveys as required by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and foreign countries to detect the presence of pests and diseases that could result in quarantine of Oregon products.
  • Provide expertise on emerging plant health issues, including the development of national policies for invasive plant pathogens and the development of model regulatory programs to address potential pathways for pathogen introduction and expedite the trade of certified plant materials interstate and internationally.

 

Major accomplis​hments

  • Completed several Cooperative Agricultural Pest Surveys in 2011 and 2012, including surveys for pathogens in corn seed fields, apple orchards, wheat and other small grain fields, grass seed, potato fields, and nurseries. These surveys support the continued export of Oregon agricultural products to interstate and international customers. Two new pests were detected: Anguina funesta, a seed gall nematode affecting annual ryegrass, and Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum, a fungus that causes boxwood blight. Response plans were developed to prevent further spread of the pests while still allowing for shipment of Oregon products.
  • Played an instrumental role in the development of the State Model Regulatory Standard: Virus-tested Certification Program for Prunus, Malus, Pyrus, Chaenomeles, and Cydonia Nursery Stock Production Systems. This national standard for virus-certified nursery stock is expected to help expedite trade with international and interstate customers.
  • Played an instrumental role in providing market access for Oregon blueberries to the Republic of Korea. Staff provided training to field inspectors and provided official testing services for pathogens of regulatory concern in support of the program.
  • Performed official testing of nursery stock, including apples, pears, plums, peaches, cherries, quince, flowering quince, and blueberry nursery stock for export. This value-added service allows nurseries to sell their nursery stock both interstate and internationally as free from viruses.
  • Inspected a record number of seed fields (903) for pathogens and pests of customer and regulatory concern in 2012. The number of fields inspected has grown 30 percent since 2009. These official inspections are required for the international sale of specialty crop seeds. Official inspections are conducted on other specialty field crops, such as garlic, mint, and fresh potatoes to Taiwan, to support interstate and international movement of these products.
  • Tested 8,216 seed lots in the laboratory in 2011 and are on pace to test a comparable number of seed lots in 2012. This indicates the export seed market is once again reaching pre-recession levels. Like seed field inspections, these official lab tests are required for the international sale of grass and other seed crops.
  • Provided official testing services in support of the federal Phytophthora ramorum certification program. This pathogen, which causes the disease sudden oak death, was detected infecting plants on 11 nurseries in 2012, and on one residential site.

 

G​oals

  • Develop a boxwood blight cleanliness program for Oregon nurseries. Boxwood blight is considered a pest within the nursery trade and is of particular concern to customers in the Eastern US. The goal of this voluntary, audit-based cleanliness program is to enable nurseries to provide their customers assurance their boxwood plants are free of this pest.
  • Continue to improve export seed testing diagnostic protocols. This will provide Oregon growers with expedited test results to better enable them to meet their customers’ needs and enable timely movement into the market place.
  • Finish a Farm Bill-funded project that compares the efficacy of three different certification programs for pest risk mitigation in nursery stock. This project is expected to demonstrate audit-based certification programs provide sufficient pest risk mitigation to facilitate the interstate and international shipment of plants for planting.

 

Seed Pr​ogram

What w​e do

  • Provide official seed sampling and testing to ensure foreign and domestic requirements are met.
  • Educate Oregon seed companies on domestic labeling requirements of seed and to ensure consumers and industry of the products they purchase.
  • Investigate producer claims of non-payment by dealers and administer Oregon law requiring payment to growers within the contractually specified time.
  • Provide inspection and certification of forage products as weed-free, adding value to Oregon hay and straw, while minimizing the spread of noxious weeds.

 

Major accompli​shments

  • Sampled more than 13,000 lots of seed in 2011 for official testing and verification required for phytosanitary export certification. This includes 820 lots sampled for International Seed Testing Association (ISTA) testing–an internationally recognized process required by several foreign markets. As of November, 2012, more than 10,000 lots were sampled including more than 600 ISTA lots.
  • Issued phytosanitary export certificates in 2011 for more than 136 million pounds of Oregon grass seed and, as of November, 2012, more than 126 million pounds.
  • Developed and adopted administrative rules for the “slow pay, no pay” law, which applies to grass seed contracts between growers and dealers. Worked with an industry ad-hoc committee and the Oregon Department of Justice to develop appropriate rules.

 

Go​als

  • Seek ways to streamline and improve the timely sharing of seed-lot test results with industry.
  • Organize industry groups to assist the department in refining rules and regulations within the Oregon Sod Quality program.
  • Harmonize the lists of prohibited and restricted noxious weeds for seed with the statewide list of quarantined noxious weeds.

 

Trade and market developmen​t: International

What we ​do

  • Provide direct buyer-seller connections for Oregon farmers, ranchers, fishers, packers, and processors through long standing relationships, outreach and education to new buyers, inbound and outbound trade missions, technical marketing activities and targeted trade shows in key export markets.
  • Advocate for resolution of impediments which restrict the movement of Oregon agricultural products in the marketplace.
  • Provide the necessary government-to-government interface for technical trade discussions, including resolution of technical trade barriers which restrict the movement of product for entire sectors or single shipments.
  • Monitor and relay technical information to the industry regarding non-tariff trade barriers and regulatory requirements, ensuring a smooth shipment of Oregon products.
  • Provide close working relationships at the federal level with the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) and regionally as a member of the Western US Agricultural Trade Association (WUSATA), to conduct the Market Access Program (MAP) grant program funded by the USDA. This program provides important program development funding for both generic and branded agricultural promotions in export markets.
  • Work closely with Business Oregon and other international marketing partners to coordinate statewide export development, agricultural investment initiatives, and plan and conduct Governors trade development missions in key export markets.

 

Major acco​mplishments

  • Planned, developed, and delivered all aspects of the agricultural portion of separate Governor’s Trade Missions to Asia in 2011 and 2012. This included numerous industry meetings in the key export markets of China, Hong Kong, South Korea, and Japan. Highlighted Oregon commodities, with representatives as part of the delegations, included blueberries, wheat, potatoes, dairy products, and wine. These missions have resulted in tremendous export opportunities in Asia for Oregon producers and processors.
  • Identified major buyers interested in high quality, value-added Oregon agricultural and food products to participate in Oregon lead inbound trade missions from key Asian markets of China, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Philippines, Vietnam, and Singapore. Products of interest included fresh blueberries, cherries, and pears as well as potatoes, onions, and processed fruits and vegetables.
  • Led and coordinated in several projects and activities as part of the Western United States Agricultural Trade Association (WUSATA). Activities included trade missions, trade shows, market promotions, and technical seminars. In particular, ODA helped organize and present a day-long “Explore Exporting” seminar at the World Trade Center in Portland. Another key activity was managing a mini-pavilion of Oregon companies at the FOODEX Trade Show in Tokyo, Asia’s largest annual food show.
  • Led key trade missions to Hong Kong and Taiwan. Several of the companies indicated they fully expect to gain new business in Hong Kong as a result of the week’s activities. Taiwan remains one of Oregon’s top export markets. Oregon companies that traveled on that mission estimate 12 month sales up to $2 mIllion. Strong categories include frozen and dried fruit products, largely berries, and substantial interest in natural and organic foods.
  • Conducted exploratory trade development work in Southeast Asia, which is considered one of the next frontiers for Oregon specialty crops products. A trade mission to Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam that included directors of both ODA and the Washington State Department of Agriculture produced important leads for Oregon beans, onions, berries, hazelnuts, potatoes, and Christmas trees with sales negotiated as a result of the mission.
  • Provided support on a number of fronts regarding the Korea Free Trade Agreement (KORUS). This included a mission to Seoul with a 10-member Oregon delegation representing hay and straw, grass seed for forage and turf, blueberries, and wine and spirits. Initial sales projections from this mission are reported to be nearly $4 million. As part of ODA’s KORUS initiative, ODA signed an interagency agreement with the Port of Portland and Business Oregon to help insure full-time representation for Oregon agriculture in this exciting and growing market.

 

Goa​ls

  • Increase purchases and usage of Oregon agricultural products through identification, development and implementation of new and existing market access opportunities.
  • Increase the competitiveness of Oregon agricultural products through direct work with Oregon producers and processors to address their production, marketing and market-based certification needs.
  • Increase sales opportunities for Oregon agricultural and food products through assistance to buyers in key international markets.
  • Enhance the production, purchase, distribution and transportation of Oregon agricultural products through advocacy and resolution of technical and non-technical barriers.

 

Trade an​d market development: Local and domestic

What we​ do

  • Conduct small business market development workshops for entrepreneurs developing new value added products.
  • Develop local networks or “clusters” of producers to achieve greater market presence or to overcome production or distribution challenges.
  • Conduct local Oregon product showcases and promotional events.
  • Initiate community food systems programs to bring local producers together with local retailers and restaurants.
  • Co-manage, along with the Oregon Health Authority, the federal Farm Direct Nutrition Program for farmers’ markets and farm stands.
  • Targeted regional and national markets to provide opportunities for Oregon growers and processors. These markets are often the logical “next step” for producers that have established good local markets but want to grow.
  • Provide product introduction and market access for small to medium size companies wanting to place their agricultural products into both regional and national distribution.
  • Target wholesale food service and specialty consumer ready product sectors at appropriate trade show venues. These venues provide cost effective access to targeted wholesale buyers in the United States.

 

Major accomplishme​nts

  • Launched “Celebrating Oregon Agriculture”, a successful multi-platform program designed to increase consumers’ awareness of how Oregon agricultural products are produced, where to purchase them, and how to use them. ODA teamed up with KATU-TV and ediblePortland on this educational and promotional program with television, print, and online components. Generating over 15 million gross impressions, the campaign is also designed to increase parents’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviors towards consuming healthful, local foods served in schools and at home.
  • Conducted a number of activities under the umbrella program, “My Oregon Farm”, including a workshop providing local producers an overview of many ODA programs and services as well as an opportunity to hear from local wholesale buyers. Other activities included participating in a Food Services of America trade event and a stand-alone Portland event featuring technical market information and introduction to local buyers to maximize participation from specialty crop farmers. ODA also collaborated with OSU to host a “My Oregon Cheese Stories” trade event in June.
  • Collaborated with the Oregon Department of Human Services to enroll more than 550 farmers as vendors in the 2012 Farm Direct and WIC Fruit and Vegetable Voucher Program for seniors and WIC families.
  • Cooperated with OSU Extension in developing the “Cultivating Agripreneurs” project in Medford. Five beginning farmers have been trained in production agriculture. A new curriculum has been designed for use by others interested in training new farmers. ODA also worked with a team from Multnomah County to establish a small scale-farming program in the Portland area. The program will assist new farmers learn how to farm and produce commercial scale farm products for the metro area.
  • Developed and managed a grower/processor showcase for invited trade buyers and media during two days of the FEAST Portland Food & Drink Festival with 53 growers and processors as well as 47 retailers, distributors and foodservice buyers participating. Additionally, staff developed themes and content for the Whole Foods Market Speaker Series, led by Portland Monthly Magazine, for more than 500 key food media and decision makers attending.
  • Collaborated with the Oregon County Fair Commission to design and create a new, mobile traveling exhibit called, “Telling the Oregon Agriculture Story”. The exhibit displayed at 7 county fairs throughout the state in 2012 and combines stunning photography of specialty crops with fun and interesting facts as part of an interactive module that can travel from fair to fair. With more than 1.5 million visitors attending county fairs in Oregon each year, the display will continue to provide outreach and education to the public.

 

Goa​ls

  • Increase purchases and usage of Oregon agricultural products through identification, development and implementation of new and existing market access opportunities.
  • Increase the competitiveness of Oregon agricultural products through direct work with Oregon producers and processors to address their production, marketing and market-based certification needs.
  • Increase sales opportunities for Oregon agricultural and food products through assistance to buyers in key local and regional markets.
  • Further develop marketing with Oregon’s agricultural sector while assuring the sustainability of the industry.
  • Further improve the ability of farmers, ranchers, fishers and food processing companies in Oregon to meet the meet customer requirements and preference standards for agricultural and food products.

 

Trade and market development: Business Development/Other industry assistance

What we​ do

  • Provide one-on-one assistance to Oregon industry sectors as well as individual companies needing market assistance and/or product development and promotion.
  • Provide solutions and eliminate barriers to retain, expand, and recruit agricultural businesses, which saves and creates jobs for Oregonians.
  • Interact with Oregon’s rural economies and troubled agricultural sectors, providing multifaceted, coordinated approaches to resolve issues.
  • Provide technical expertise in partnership with Oregon State University at the Food Innovation Center.
  • Provide access and technical assistance to state and federal grant programs for the benefit of agricultural producers and processors.
  • Work closely with Business Oregon, the Governor’s Economic Revitalization Teams (ERT), and a variety of port and municipal-based economic development organizations throughout the state.
  • Conduct state supervised price negotiations for various industry sectors.
  • Advocate for improved transportation options through representation on the Oregon Freight Advisory Committee.

 

Major accompli​shments

  • Participated in out-of-state recruitment efforts. The Natural Product Expo in Anaheim, CA attracted nearly 4,000 companies from around the US and the world displaying natural products. In addition, there were 50,000 attendees. There were 41 leads of out-of-state companies planning on expansion or relocation within the next two years and 40 leads of companies looking to develop a co-packer relationship with the Pacific Northwest. In addition, the Fancy Food Show in San Francisco produced numerous leads after discussions with more than 60 different specialty food companies in attendance.
  • Partnered with OSU, Business Oregon, and Blue Mountain Community College to present at the 2011 Regards to Rural Conference. More than 500 people from 14 states attended. The conference focus was to help energize Oregon’s rural community and bolster economic development. ODA staff presented information about food system resources and export opportunities.
  • Presided over state-supervised price negotiations between producers and dealers/processors involving grass seed and Dungeness crab.
  • Facilitated numerous efforts to attract and establish new USDA meat processing facilities in Bandon and near Brownsville, a horse slaughter plant in Hermiston, a freeze-dried pear product project in Hood River, a value-added mint confection business in Columbia County, expansion of grain exports and seafood processing at the Port of Astoria, and processing and production of flax in Oregon. Projects and efforts are in varying degrees of completion.

 

Goa​ls

  • Create and maintain jobs by increasing the value and uses of Oregon agricultural products through retention, expansion and recruitment of agricultural sectors and businesses.
  • Identify and facilitate development of new value-added uses of Oregon food and agricultural products.
  • Retain or increase investment and employment in rural Oregon through the development of complementary food and agricultural product processing infrastructure.
  • Focus on communities and help build infrastructure, adding value to farm outputs.

 

Specialty​ Crop Block Grant Program

What we​ do

  • Enhance the competitiveness of Oregon’s specialty crops by facilitating a grant program funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Services (AMS). For the purpose of the program specialty crops are defined as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture and nursery crops (including floriculture). The ODA conducts an annual competitive application process to award grant funds.

 

Major accomplishm​ents

  • Provided outreach, development, selection, and administration of 46 projects funded by the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program in 2011 and 2012, in collaboration with an industry advisory group. The grants, totaling $1.72 million in 2011 and $1.49 million in 2012, will help Oregon fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, and nursery crops increase their competitiveness in the marketplace. The funded projects generally aim to develop new markets at home and abroad, address distribution bottlenecks, train the next generation of farmers, and strengthen food safety.
  • Conducted outreach through webinars, key one-on-one meetings, site visits, key conferences, and by encouraging a consultative approach with ODA’s marketing programs.
  • Assisted ODA staff in developing and implementing 14 projects in areas such as: Farm to School, export market preparedness, native bees as pollinators, nursery cleanliness, berry food safety, hazelnut food safety, certification of blueberries for Korean markets, and specialty crop education at county fairs.

 

Go​als

  • Enhance the competiveness of Oregon specialty crops by facilitating the development of projects that seize opportunities and address barriers for Oregon farmers, processors, and markets.
  • Provide outreach and trainings to assist applicants in developing high quality, deeply impactful projects.
  • Facilitate a robust, open and fair competitive process.
  • Provide trainings for grantees to ensure project success and regulatory compliance.
  • Monitor project success through site visits, biannual reports, and ongoing technical assistance.
  • Encourage partnership and collaboration across sectors, among specific industries, and with other states specialty crop programs.

 

Farm to School Progra​m

What we​ do

  • Reduce barriers to entry and engage Oregon food producers, processors and manufacturers in the local, regional and national school food market in order to increase production, purchase, and promotion of Oregon agricultural products.
  • Support effective local, regional and national public-private partnerships in order to propel farm to school activities across Oregon.
  • Conduct research and evaluation in order to: (1) Establish progress towards ODA farm to school program outcome measures; (2) Address critical knowledge gaps that create barriers to entry, and (3) Ensure efficient and successful implementation of farm to school programs and practices.
  • Pursue strategic media and communications in order to help tell the story of Oregon agriculture while improving Oregonian’s knowledge and attitudes towards purchasing, promoting and consuming Oregon foods.

 

Major accom​plishments

  • Since 2008, the number of school districts purchasing Oregon agriculture products has increased to 90 out of 198 districts. These 90 districts serve over 60% of the kids in the state. As farm to school is maturing in Oregon, emphasis has gone from serving locally produced fruits and vegetables to include the center of the plate main entree, dairy, beef, poultry, seafood, grains and legumes.
  • Held the second annual “Farm to School Showcase” in partnership with Ecotrust and funding from Spirit Mountain Casino. A total of 25 vendors and organizations (Trawl Commission, Beef Council, and Oregon Cattlemen’s Association) participated in a featured showcase for the 250+ school food buyers in Oregon. The majority of food service staff, 73 percent, reported making at least two significant new connections with regional producers, processors, and distributors, and the strong majority of regional vendors, 87 percent, reported making at least three significant connections with school districts. Among food service staff, 65 percent reported at least some increase in knowledge and awareness of healthy, regional food products and Farm to School Program.
  • Managed Oregon’s FoodCorps Program. Oregon was selected as one of ten states to participate in the new national Farm to School and school garden service program that places young adults in high-need communities to connect children with healthy food. In 2011- 2012, service members were placed in Benton, Lane, Tillamook, Marion, Multnomah, and Union counties, along with a FoodCorps fellow who is placed at the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Tasks include expanding hands-on nutrition education programs, building and tending school gardens, and sourcing healthy, local food for school cafeterias. In 2011, service members served more than 8,000 students, generated over 300 volunteers, and helped grow almost 2,000 pounds of donated food.
  • Recruited and highlighted 12 Oregon food producers at the first ever “Oregon Bounty” row at the annual Oregon School Nutrition Association trade show. More than 200 school food buyers from across the state attend the trade show.
  • Managed two contractors to act as School Garden Coordinators, one each in the North Powder and the Salem-Keizer school districts. In addition to supplying teachers with lessons that teach youth and their families about Oregon specialty crops, both coordinators will work to ensure Oregon specialty crops are also served and promoted in school cafeterias.
  • Launched a Boat-to-School campaign focused on providing school food services across the state with the knowledge, skills, and tools needed to procure, prepare, serve and promote local seafood in school meal programs. Working with the Oregon Beef and Dairy Councils to develop a similar campaign for increasing promotion and education of local beef and dairy in school meals.
  • Developed written Farm to School materials for a variety of audiences including academics and practitioners including two articles in Childhood Obesity’s recent special issue on school food, and co-authoring the first ever Health Impact Assessment of House Bill 2800, a State Level Farm to School Policy. Drafted and presented testimony for the Oregon State Legislature and a Congressional Briefing. Drafted and disseminated eight press releases.

 

G​oals

  • Establish baseline measure of utilization of and economic benefit from Oregon food products in school feeding programs. Seek USDA support in institutionalizing this data collection.
  • Broker first meetings—Connect 20 farmers and 5 food processors to school food services through “speed-dating,” OSNA annual and quarterly meetings, FoodHub, field trips and other events.
  • Work with the Oregon Department of Education and ODA’s Food Safety Program to develop school garden food safety protocols.
  • Work with ODE to support implementation and evaluation of HB 2800, the Farm to School and School Garden grant program.
  • Identify resources to complete Phase III of the Oregon Harvest for School Program. Complete up to 36 months worth of toolkit materials. Explore opportunities with the Beef and Trawl Commissions and Dairy Council to develop similar toolkit materials.
  • Seek out and create opportunities for earned media. Continue Celebrate Oregon Agriculture campaign for up to 2 promos and 10 segments generating over 15 million media impressions.
  • Launch “Boat to School” procurement and promotion.
  • Train 100 people on how to develop and evaluate school garden programs that support farm to school efforts, identify opportunities for incorporating agricultural education in state standards and curriculum development, and secure resources for school garden development.

 

Commodity​ Commission Oversight Program

What we d​o

  • Provide legislatively mandated monitoring and assistance to Oregon’s 23 agricultural and commercial fisheries commodity commissions. These grower/harvester funded and supported commissions include ones that are part of national marketing efforts. Commodity commissions act as industry self-help agencies. The commissioners, with the input of the program manager who serves as an ex-officio member of each commission, set direction and make decisions about marketing, research and educational projects. The program’s hands-on involvement permits the commissions to legally collect mandatory assessments from growers and harvesters.
  • Review budgets, all contracts and financial agreements, and acts as a resource on administrative, marketing, ethical, legal compliance, and human resource matters for all 23 commodity commissions.
  • Provide a communication link among the commissions and to the ODA which leads to cooperative marketing and research efforts.

 

Major accomplis​hments

  • Recruited for about 70 commissioner positions per year among 23 commodity commissions. Reviewed and qualified applicants for appointment by the ODA Director. Streamlined recruitment process, saving personnel and supplies, converting to email and electronic media notification.
  • Assisted 23 commissions in the processes of preparing annual budgets and annual marketing and research operational plans. Reviewed budgets to assure legal compliance. Facilitated the ODA Director authorizing the budgets. Reviewed annual operational plans. ODA’s involvement in crafting and reviewing marketing operational plans provides commissions with legal protection.
  • Facilitated information sharing that led to collaboration between the commissions and with ODA. The three berry related commodity commissions worked with ODA to organize and hold four food safety workshops that the agency coordinated. Approximately 250 field bosses, farm managers, and owners attended the workshops which aimed to train the trainers. The sessions were offered in English and Spanish.
  • Facilitated a new partnership between the Raspberry Blackberry Commission and the Agricultural Research Foundation that will assist the industrywide Berry Festival in recruiting sponsors for its third annual event in Northwest Portland. The Berry Festival was named one of the best festivals for families and garnered national press from Sunset and Parade magazines.

 

Goal​s

  • Ensure commodity commissions assist farmers, ranchers, fishers, food processors and dealers with generic promotion, research and education programs through administration of the Oregon Commodity Commission Oversight Program.
  • Continue to look for additional ways to streamline the program operation and delivery of services to the commodity commissions. Continue to inform commissions about opportunities to use teleconferencing and computer software that can be used for public meetings.
  • Expand use of new media and implement other effective ways to recruit applicants for commissioner appointments.
  • Improve communication and understanding of the commodity commission program. Highlight the projects and major accomplishments of the commodity commissions on the ODA website and in other media.
  • Acknowledge retiring commissioners for their leadership in their respective industries.
  • Continue to facilitate cooperative marketing and research projects between the commissions and ODA in which all parties collaborate to increase the economic benefits for the involved commodity industries and the state.


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Natural Resource Programs

Introduction

The Natural Resources Program Area addresses water quality and natural resource conservation on agricultural lands, the appropriate use of pesticides, labeling and sale of fertilizer, field burning in the Willamette Valley, and oyster plat leasing. Through outreach efforts, compliance, monitoring, and coordination with other natural resource agencies, the programs help landowners meet society goals in a manner that makes both economic and environmental sense. In addition, maintaining high quality agricultural land in production is an important long-term strategy for Oregon.

 

Water Qualit​y Program

What we do​

  • Conduct outreach and education to landowners and local partners about agricultural water quality regulations and Oregon’s water quality goals.
  • Support strategic delivery of technical and financial assistance for producers.
  • Evaluate water quality, landscape condition, and project data to track agriculture’s progress to meet Oregon’s water quality goals.
  • Oversee review of all 38 water quality management plans and regulations each biennium. The plans describe strategies to improve water quality, while the regulations describe requirements in each specific area.
  • Meet regularly with stakeholders to gather input on program implementation.
  • Support the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds through water quality improvements in salmon habitat.

 

Major​ accomplishments

  • Conducted planning to identify opportunities to deliver the program more strategically. Held listening tours around the state to gather input from stakeholders.
  • Revised Memorandum of Agreement with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) relating to agricultural nonpoint source pollution.
  • Entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with DEQ, Oregon Water Enhancement Board (OWEB) and USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to determine the effectiveness of conservation practices to protect and restore natural resources.
  • Submitted program report to the Senate Environment Committee summarizing accomplishments by ODA, Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs), and other agencies that fund water quality improvements in agriculture.
  • Participated in the Water Quality Pesticide Management Team along with DEQ, Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), Department of Human Services (DHS), and Oregon State University (OSU).
  • Investigated 52 compliance concerns in 2011 and 61 concerns in 2012.
  • Resolved water quality complaints and issues, mostly through non-regulatory paths. These are win-win solutions and often result in improved operation management, livestock health, and soil retention.
  • Worked with 9 SWCDs to try pilot projects with focused outreach and technical assistance in small watersheds.
  • As a result of resources provided for the 2011-13 biennium, we hired a new water quality monitoring specialist who updated the program’s monitoring strategy, enhanced interactions with other agencies regarding monitoring, and implemented program effectiveness monitoring efforts.
  • Monitored riparian vegetation conditions in 20 of the 38 management areas with funding committed in 2011 by the Oregon Legislature.
  • Contracted with DEQ to monitor water quality at 19 agricultural sites, complementing 42 existing agricultural sites also monitored by DEQ. This monitoring was also accomplished with funding committed in 2011 by the Oregon Legislature.
  • Completed a report on the Agricultural Water Quality Program that included a program overview, discussion of partnerships, a description of program activities and measures of effectiveness, and an evaluation of strengths and weaknesses.
  • Filled a vacant riparian and vegetation specialist position. This position supports the Agricultural Water Quality Program efforts related to riparian management and improvement in streamside condition.

 

G​oals

  • Monitor agriculture’s progress to meet Oregon’s water quality goals, including management practices implemented, improvements in stream and riparian condition, and improvements in water chemistry.
  • Continue streamlining program processes to save time and allow staff to devote more time to strategic planning and compliance work.
  • Continue to gather input from stakeholders on options to implement the program more strategically.


Con​fined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) Program

Wh​at we do

  • Operate under a memorandum of agreement with DEQ to permit animal feeding operations and achieve compliance with state and federal laws.
  • ODA and DEQ (through the Environmental Quality Commission) jointly issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) CAFO Permit.
  • Conduct routine annual inspections of CAFO facilities to ensure animal waste does not cause water pollution.
  • Help CAFO operators comply with reporting and record keeping requirements.
  • Provide operational reviews at the request of CAFO operators, and assistance in the development and operation of Animal Waste Management Plans.
  • Maintain a statewide CAFO Program advisory committee of farmers, ranchers, industry representatives, and interested public to identify opportunities for improvement.

 

Major accomplis​hments

  • Implemented “performance based” CAFO inspections, improved relationships between ODA and the regulated community and helped facilities comply with water quality laws.
  • Conducted 571 routine annual inspections in 2011, 48 follow up inspections, 22 complaint inspections, and 68 other types of inspections. For 2012 (YTD), conducted 459 inspections, 44 follow inspections, 12 complaint inspections, and 131 other types of inspections.
  • DEQ documented and reported on TMDL water quality improvements in Tillamook Bay watershed. Reduction of bacteria levels move two (2) of the watershed’s five (5) rivers into attainment with TMDL required levels. Tillamook watersheds have the highest concentration of CAFOs of any Oregon county.

 

Goals​

  • Maintain the inspection, enforcement, outreach, and compliance assistance program for permitted CAFOs.

 

Soil & Wa​ter Conservation Districts Program

What we​ do

  • Assist local soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) that, in turn, help landowners properly manage Oregon’s natural resources.
  • Support the state Soil and Water Conservation Commission, and provide administrative oversight and state funding coordination to Oregon’s 45 SWCDs.
  • Help SWCDs deliver technical assistance and conservation programs to landowners to improve water quality, salmon habitat, and general watershed health.
  • Support the SWCD board of directors election process.
  • Administer a program that has distributed $6 million in state and federal funds under OWEB grant agreements to Oregon’s 45 SWCDs. These funds allow SWCDs to help landowners with conservation planning, project design, construction inspection, and projects associated with local Agricultural Water Quality Area Management Plans.

 

​Major accomplishments

  • Helped districts develop and implement an employee training program in 2011 and 2012 to help staff stay in compliance with employee, contract, and other business laws.
  • Provided training to newly elected SWCD Directors to ensure knowledge of responsibilities, ethics, leadership, and elections.
  • Provided daily assistance to SWCD personnel regarding human resources, legal obligations, risk mitigation, and other operation issues and challenges.

 

​Goals

  • Provide guidance to all 45 SWCDs on effective district operation including long range business plans, conservation easements, financial management, and legal compliance.
  • Provide assistance to districts planning to obtain an ad valorum tax.
  • Assist the Soil and Water Conservation Commission in providing leadership and guidance to SWCD program staff and all SWCDs statewide.

 

Pes​ticides Program

Wh​at we do

  • Protect Oregon’s environment and public health by ensuring the proper and legal sale, use, and distribution of pesticide products. Pesticide products include substances intended to control or manage pests. Herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, repellents, and disinfectants are all examples of pesticide products. These products are used for agriculture and forestry pest control, and in a wide variety of commercial, public, and residential sites.
  • Register pesticide and fertilizer products for sale, use, or distribution in Oregon. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines the uses and restrictions of each pesticide product. ODA’s Pesticides Program ensures compliance and accuracy of information contained on the product label.
  • Issue pesticide applicator licensing to assess level of knowledge and expertise to perform pesticide application activities lawfully. This is accomplished by administrating and passing specific written examinations prior to licensing.
  • Provide outreach and education to both licensed pesticide users and the general public. This is done through continuing education training courses, informational brochures, the ODA website, and one-on-one communication.
  • Communicate laws and regulations to pesticide applicators and the public. This includes changes to product labels to mitigate risks to people, endangered species, waterways, etc.
  • Conduct routine compliance monitoring, investigate complaints of alleged pesticide misuse, and administer enforcement action when appropriate. Enforcement actions, including civil penalties, play a vital role in deterring unlawful use of pesticides.
  • Request special authorizations from EPA for specific pesticide use. This includes Special Local Need registrations or Emergency Exemptions to control potentially devastating pests and diseases.
  • Administer and participate as a key member of the Pesticide Analytical Response Center (PARC), which reviews claims of adverse health, or environmental harm associated with pesticide use.

 

Major accomplishmen​ts

  • Ensured pesticide products used in Oregon are registered and labeled correctly, and that people are applying pesticides in a lawful manner. Keeping track of pesticide products and licensed users helps to safeguard human health and the environment. Oregon presently registers approximately 12,000 pesticide products annually.
  • Obtained Special Local Need registrations and Emergency Exemption authorizations from EPA for specific pesticide uses in Oregon not otherwise available. This was a benefit to agricultural producers with limited options to control pests. Oregon issues approximately 20 Special Local Need registrations and 10 Emergency Exemption authorizations annually.
  • Processed applications and issued pesticide licenses to businesses and applicators. Those licensees include private, public, and commercial pesticide applicators, trainees, operators, dealers, and consultants. Approximately 12,000 licenses are processed and issued annually.
  • Administered approximately 3,500 pesticide certification or re-certification examinations throughout the state in order to ensure a base level of competency of certified applicators and to meet federal requirements. Certification is required prior to licensing as a pesticide applicator, pesticide consultant, or private pesticide applicator. For commercial and public applicators, pesticide certification in specific use categories is required for the type of applications conducted and is contingent upon taking, and passing, written examinations.
  • Responded to pesticide related complaints and use concerns dealing with pesticide application activities. ODA receives approximately 300 complaints annually.
  • Conducted 340 compliance investigations and issued 110 enforcement response for violations of the pesticide laws and regulations (ORS 634). Enforcement actions include issuance of stop sale, use, or removal orders; notices of violation, and civil penalties and referrals to EPA.
  • Administered the Pesticide Analytical and Response Center (PARC) reviewing incidents of alleged health or environmental harm associated with pesticide use. Data collected by PARC is used to make policy recommendations for action.
  • Collaborated with other key state agencies and EPA to establish the Water Quality Pesticide Management Team to evaluate the impact of pesticides on groundwater and surface water in Oregon.
  • Provided information and comments, and made suggestions regarding changes in pesticide regulation enacted or proposed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
  • Collaborated with other key state agencies and EPA to evaluate and provide feedback associated with Biological Opinions developed by the US National Marine Fisheries Service. Oregon also serves an important role in communication and education to the regulated community.
  • Implemented licensing and recordkeeping requirements for public applicators established by Integrated Pest Management in schools legislation.
  • Conducted 110 educational/outreach presentations to licensees, industry groups and the public regarding changes in pesticide regulation enacted or proposed by ODA or the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

 

Goal​s

  • Streamline pesticide certification and licensing processes to facilitate business needs and ensure responsible pesticide use. This has been accomplished by the transition to computer based testing to expedite the testing process and issuance of applicator licenses.
  • Coordinate with Oregon State University in communicating changes in federal and/or state pesticide regulations and in implementing the Integrated Pest Management in Schools program.
  • Collaborate with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Health Authority through a Memorandum of Understanding in implementing the Pesticide Management Plan to address pesticides found in surface and ground water.
  • Work cooperatively with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality in the development and implementation of a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for pesticide applications to, over, and near waters of the state.
  • Increase education, outreach and compliance assistance activities for current and new pesticide requirements.

 

Fertilizers P​rogram

What we d​o

  • Conduct marketplace inspections of fertilizer and other soil amending products to ensure compliance with state law and collect samples for nutrient analysis and heavy metal content.
  • Protect consumers by ensuring that claims made on a label accurately represent the product. Product registration facilitates review and evaluation of label claims, and ensures heavy metal levels do not exceed state limits for arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel. This program addresses products used in agriculture, urban/residential, and hydroponics.

 

Major acco​mplishments

  • Registered 8,091 fertilizer, agricultural mineral, agricultural amendment, and lime products in 2012, amounting to more than 1.9 million tons of product (calendar year 2011 tonnage). The program also licensed 232 manufacturer/bulk distributors.
  • Conducted 140 marketplace inspections in both 2011 and 2012 sampling and analyzing 254 products for accurate claims.
  • Issued 88 enforcement responses for violations of the fertilizer laws and regulations (ORS 633). Enforcement actions includes issuance of notices of violation, and civil penalties.
  • Provided grant monies, through ODA’s Fertilizer Research Program, for projects that address the interactions of fertilizers, agricultural minerals, and agricultural amendments with ground or surface water. Since 1990, the program has provided $1,878,965 for 88 projects dealing with a wide variety of Oregon crops throughout the state.

 

Go​als

  • Protect consumers by ensuring uniform and accurate product labeling and that claims made on a fertilizer product label accurately represent the product.
  • Provide assurance, through product sampling and analysis, that fertilizer products provide the nutrients claimed.
  • Assure protection for Oregon’s environment and natural resources from heavy metals, excess nutrients, and other contaminants.
  • Support fertilizer research and development that funds research projects on the interactions of products with ground and surface water.
  • Continue to work with fertilizer industry representatives, legislature, and interested parties to explore long-range funding options for the base fertilizer program and fertilizer-related research.


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Plant Programs

Intr​oduction

The Plant Program Area protects Oregon’s agricultural industries and natural environment from harmful plant pests, diseases, and noxious weeds; enhances the value and marketability of exported nursery stock, Christmas trees, seeds and other agricultural products; and furthers the conservation of threatened and endangered plants. This is accomplished through four programs: Insect Pest Prevention & Management, Native Plant Conservation, Noxious Weed Control, and Nursery & Christmas Tree.

 

Insect Pest P​revention & Management Program

What we do​

  • Enact and maintain quarantine regulations to protect Oregon from introductions of invasive insect pests.
  • Design, implement, and conduct statewide surveys to quickly detect populations of invasive pests.
  • Eradicate populations of invasive pests while they are still low in numbers so that economic and environmental harm is prevented and the cost of eradication is affordable.
  • Provide insect identification, technical information, and general outreach for stakeholders, agriculturalists, and the general public.

 

Major accomplishm​ents

  • Implemented successful invasive pest surveys throughout the state, including surveys for gypsy moth and other Asian defoliating moths, Japanese beetle, grape and stone fruit pests, and exotic wood borers.
  • Conducted statewide gypsy moth detection surveys utilizing over 10,000 traps each year. In 2011, for the first time in program history, no gypsy moths were trapped; in 2012, only one was detected in Eugene. For the third straight year, there was no gypsy moth eradication program.
  • Monitored and responded to a record grasshopper year in 2011, with almost 3 million acres of rangeland infested with economic levels. Grasshopper numbers declined some in 2012 but were still high.
  • Surveyed, for the first time, for Christmas tree pests and native bees. A majority of Oregon’s Christmas trees are exported and Mexico, Hawaii, and other markets are concerned about receiving tree pests.
  • Conducted research on biocontrol control of brown marmorated stink bug, a new invader that threatens fruit and vegetable crops, and invades houses.
  • Implemented Japanese beetle eradication projects in Portland, Troutdale, and Cave Junction.
  • Cooperated with OSU to educate growers on methods to identify and manage Spotted Wing Drosophila.
  • Worked with the Oregon Invasive Species Council to adopt regulations to require firewood imported from outside the PNW be heat treated and pest-free.

 

Goa​ls

  • Protect Oregon’s environmental and agricultural resources from invasive invertebrate pests.
  • Implement an efficient detection survey program for gypsy moth, Japanese beetle, and other non-native pests.
  • Implement a rapid response system to mitigate damage when infestations of invasive pests are found.
  • Develop efficient management and biological control programs to control established exotic pests.
  • Improve invasive pest identification capabilities including production of illustrated keys.
  • Maintain an effective early detection and rapid response capability in a time of shrinking budgets.

 

Noxious We​ed Control Program

What we d​o

  • Protect Oregon’s natural resources from the invasion and proliferation of exotic and invasive noxious weeds.
  • Provide leadership and coordinate noxious weed management.
  • Enact and maintain weed quarantine regulations to protect Oregon from introductions of invasive weeds.
  • Survey for invasive weeds so that newly introduced populations are found as soon as possible.
  • Serve as a technical resource for noxious weed issues, including acting as a primary resource for weed identification.
  • Provide public outreach, education, and awareness.
  • Conduct weed risk assessments.
  • Implement early detection and rapid response projects for new invaders. This includes eradication of invasive weed populations while they are still low in numbers so that economic and environmental harm is prevented and the cost of eradication is affordable.
  • Introduce and redistribute biological control agents to reduce the impacts of invasive weeds that are widespread to reduce economic and environmental harm and minimize herbicide use.
  • Administer the OWEB/State Weed Board Grant Program.


​Major accomplishments

  • In 2011 and 2012, over 1200 noxious weed treatments were made using integrated control methods.
  • Biological agents were released at more than 120 sites. Over 200 biocontrol sites were monitored to determine establishment and impact. ODA provided more than 153,000 biocontrol agents to cooperators for release.
  • Provided technical assistance to the Oregon State Weed Board in reviewing grant proposals. About 100 grants were awarded totaling nearly $2 million in each year of the biennium.
  • Continued monitoring giant reed, Arundo donax, test fields. This known weed has created controversy because of the current interest in using it as an alternative fuel for the PGE Boardman coal-fired power plant. Developed administrative rules regulating production of giant reed for biofuel.
  • Confirmed the presence of Goatsrue, Galega officinalis, in December of 2011 in Washington County. Follow-up investigation turned up an addition location in Multnomah County. This is an “A” weed in Oregon and a federal noxious weed that is a threat to riparian areas and toxic to livestock.
  • Completed seven new publications for distribution to the public and cooperators, providing information about priority noxious weeds. The publications help with identification and early detection efforts.
  • Detected an increasing number of orange hawkweed infestations, Hieracium aurantiacum, in central and northeastern Oregon, and the Portland metro area. Most of these infestations stem from ornamental plantings. One site was found north of Bend.
  • Completed drafting and developing an administrative rule that clarifies ODA’s authority to address “A” listed noxious weeds as a public nuisance under OAR 603-052-1200. During the previous legislative session, the noxious weed statutes were consolidated and updated.
  • Released a new version of WeedMapper, a web-based weed mapping system that tracks noxious weed distribution in Oregon.

 

Goa​ls

  • Continue to fulfill mission to protect Oregon’s natural resources from the invasion and proliferation of invasive noxious weeds.
  • Provide leadership, set priorities, and coordinate noxious weed control activities statewide.
  • Detect new weed invasions as early as possible and respond with effective eradication or containment strategies.
  • Introduce, monitor, and redistribute effective biological control agents.
  • Maintain an effective early detection and rapid response capability in a time of shrinking budgets.


​Nursery & Christmas Tree Programs

What we do

  • Inspect and certify Oregon-grown nursery stock and Christmas trees shipped out-of-state to meet the importation requirements of other states and countries.
  • Help nurseries produce nursery stock and Christmas trees that are free of insect pests, diseases, and weeds so that harmful pests aren’t spread.
  • Maintain Oregon’s reputation for high-quality products.
  • Inspect high-risk imported nursery stock so that unhealthy nursery stock doesn’t bring insect pests, plant diseases, or weeds to Oregon.
  • Participate in the USDA Phytophthora ramorum (a.k.a. sudden oak death/SOD) nursery certification program ensuring Oregon nursery stock can be shipped to other states and countries.
  • Conduct a Grower Assisted Inspection Program (GAIP) to help growers implement best management practices to reduce plant diseases.

 

Major accom​plishments

  • Performed inspection and export certification services for Oregon’s $100 million Christmas tree and $670 million nursery industries.
  • Issued nearly 8,000 state and federal phytosanitary certificates each year. Virtually all of these certificates were issued using the USDA’s electronic Phytosanitary Certificate Issuance and Tracking (PCIT) system.
  • Provided inspection and certification that allowed the export of Oregon nursery stock and Christmas trees to over 60 foreign countries.
  • Assisted four Oregon nurseries that participated in the United States Nursery Certification Program (USNCP).
  • Began certifying log shipments to China leaving the Port of Coos Bay.
  • Collected and made available $192,000 for nursery-related research grants through the Nursery Research Assessment Fund.
  • Staffed a booth at the Far-West Show, Oregon’s largest nursery trade show, to increase knowledge of plant quarantine compliance.
  • Oversaw the participation of 172 Christmas tree and nursery stock growers in the 2012 European Pine Shoot Moth (EPSM) trapping program. EPSM traps were placed at 183 separate growing grounds.
  • Surveyed 628 host nurseries and 529 non-host nurseries to meet the requirements of the federal Phytophthora ramorum order. Confirmed six Oregon nurseries as positive for P. ramorum in 2011 and eleven in 2012 and destroyed infected and exposed nursery stock.
  • Detected boxwood blight, a serious disease of Buxus spp., for the first time in Oregon in December 2011.
  • Assisted 16 Oregon nurseries that participated in the Grower Assisted Inspection Program (GAIP).
  • Extensively used the Nursery Information Management System (NIMS) to document staff’s daily activities and used it as a tool for managing the Phytophthora ramorum certification program.

 

Goa​ls

  • Assist nurseries in providing nursery stock that is free of dangerous pests and diseases and meets the requirements of out-of-state markets.
  • Provide inspection and certification of nursery stock and Christmas trees grown and shipped from Oregon.
  • Prevent the spread of injurious pests, plant diseases and noxious weeds that hitchhike on nursery stock within the state of Oregon.
  • Inspect incoming shipments of plant material for compliance with Oregon and US quarantines.
  • Make information available to all licensed Christmas tree growers and nurseries relative to importation requirements of other states and countries.

 

Native Pla​nt Conservation Program

What we​ do

  • Protect and conserve Oregon’s native flora and vanishing habitats by assisting public agencies and private citizens on management of threatened and endangered native plants.
  • Set priorities for the establishment of conservation programs and plans for protected native species.
  • Provide guidance and support to state and local government agencies managing lands that contain target plant species or their habitat.
  • Oversee and regulate research and restoration activities involving target species and habitat on state lands.
  • Create a system of permits to regulate commercial activities associated with protected plant collection and related actions on public lands.
  • Establish and revise Oregon’s list of protected native plants, as well as providing state review of the federal government’s process for listing Oregon plant species under the federal Endangered Species Act.
  • Conduct research to develop protocols for protected species recovery efforts, designed to aid in their eventual delisting.

 

Major accomplishm​ents

  • Completed the second year of development of a Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) working closely with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).
  • Discovered 30 new populations of threatened and endangered plants and collected baseline data for the approximately 90 known locations of listed plants and butterflies managed by ODOT.
  • Completed other habitat conservation plans including prairie species HCPs in Benton and Yamhill counties. Currently working with USFWS, SalmonSafe, and other private partners to explore the idea of an HCP covering vineyards and other agricultural venues in the Willamette Valley.
  • Conducted botanical surveys that provide plant identification and survey expertise to state and local governments in order to help them meet their obligation to protect listed plants on publicly-managed lands.
  • Consulted with 25 federal, state, and local government agencies regarding more than 150 publicly-funded land actions throughout the state.
  • Initiated or continued work on 44 of Oregon’s 60 listed plant species, as well as research involving several candidate or other rare species.

 

Goal​s

  • Continue to protect and conserve Oregon’s native threatened and endangered plants and vanishing habitats.
  • Review status of all Oregon’s threatened, endangered, and candidate species. 
  • Maintain an effective T&E plant conservation program in the face of elimination of all state support.


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ODA Directory

Administration and ​Information

635 Capitol St NE
Salem OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4550
Fax 503-986-4747
Email info@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA


Katy Coba, Director
Lisa Charpilloz Hanson, Deputy Director
Lauren Henderson, Assistant Director
Bruce Pokarney, Director of Communications

 

Hotlines

Smoke Complaint 503-986-4709
Farm Mediation 800-347-7028
Shellfish Safety 800-448-2474
Invasive Species 866-468-2337

 

ODA Food Safety and Animal Health Programs

The Food Safety and Animal Health Program Area inspects all facets of Oregon’s food distribution system (except restaurants) to ensure food is safe for consumption, protects and maintains animal health, and ensures animal feeds meet nutritional and labeling standards. In the food safety portion of the program area, nearly 7,000 food establishments in Oregon are licensed and inspected. Programs respond to food safety issues to protect the public while working with the food industry through education and collaboration to prevent unhealthy or unsafe conditions in the food supply. In the animal heath portion of the program area, Oregon’s livestock industries and their markets are protected through programs that test for, control, and eradicate animal disease.

635 Capitol St NE
Salem OR 97301
Phone 503-986-4720
Fax 503-986-4729
Email fsd-manager@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA/pages/pa_food_animal.aspx
Vance Bybee, Director
Brad LeaMaster, State Veterinarian

 

ODA Internal Services and Consumer Protection Programs

The Internal Services and Consumer Protection (ISCP) Program Area provides consumer protection, ensures fair competition among businesses, and facilitates interstate commerce and international trade. This is done by: ensuring the accuracy, validity, uniformity, and confidence in Oregon’s Commercial Weighing System; ensuring that motor fuels sold in Oregon meet national standards for quality; providing safe, accurate, timely, and cost-efficient laboratory analysis and technical support to ODA enforcement programs and other local, state and federal agencies; providing analytical and technical support for moving value added food products to domestic and foreign markets. The ISCP also administers the Wolf Depredation Compensation Grant and the Egg-Laying Hen Cage/Space Compliance programs.

635 Capitol St NE
Salem OR 97301
Phone 503-986-4670
Fax 503-986-4784
Email msd-info@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA/Pages/pa_cons_serv.aspx
Jason Barber, Director

 

ODA Market Access and Certification Programs

The Market Access and Certification Program Area assists Oregon’s agricultural producers to successfully sell and ship products to local, national, and international markets. The marketing portion of the program area works to promote and create demand for Oregon agricultural products. The inspection and certification portion of the program area adds value by making products more marketable. It also provides services to facilitate product movement, and services that overcome trade barriers and technical constraints affecting agriculture. These programs reach rural and urban areas alike to create jobs and sustainable opportunities for the state’s multi-billion dollar agricultural sector.

635 Capitol St NE
Salem OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4620
Fax 503-986-4737
Email cid-expert@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA/pages/pa_ma_cert.aspx
Jim Cramer, Director

 

Gary Roth, Market Development
1207 NW Naito Parkway, Suite 104
Portland, OR 97209-2832
Phone 503-872-6600
Fax 503-872-6601
Email agmarket@oda.state.or.us

 

ODA Natural Resources Programs

The Natural Resources Program Area addresses water quality and natural resource conservation on agricultural lands, the appropriate use of pesticides, labeling and sale of fertilizer, field burning in the Willamette Valley, and oyster plat leasing. Through outreach efforts, compliance, monitoring, and coordination with other natural resource agencies, the programs help landowners meet society goals in a manner that makes both economic and environmental sense. In addition, maintaining high quality agricultural land in production is an important long-term strategy for Oregon. The Land Use Program provides technical assistance to farmers as well as local, regional, and state governments on land use proposals.

635 Capitol St NE
Salem OR 97301
Phone 503-986-4700
Fax 503-986-4730
Email nrd-expert@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA/pages/pa_nat_res.aspx
Ray Jaindl, Director

 

ODA Plant Programs

The Plant Program Area protects Oregon’s agricultural industries and natural environment from harmful plant pests, diseases, and noxious weeds; enhances the value and marketability of exported nursery stock, Christmas trees, seeds and other agricultural products; and furthers the conservation of threatened and endangered plants. This is accomplished through four programs: Insect Pest Prevention & Management, Native Plant Conservation, Noxious Weed Control, and Nursery & Christmas Tree.

635 Capitol St NE
Salem OR 97301
Phone 503-986-4636
Fax 503-986-4786
Email plant-pest-disease-expert@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA/PLANT
Dan Hilburn, Director

 

Oregon State Board of Agriculture

The State Board of Agriculture advises the Oregon Department of Agriculture regarding administration and enforcement of department programs, and its policies. The board holds quarterly meetings, solicits producer and public input, and represents a full spectrum of commodity production.

635 Capitol St NE #313
Salem OR 97301
Phone 503-986-4550
Fax 503-986-4750
Email skudna@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA/Pages/boardoverview.aspx

Barbara Boyer
Pete Brentano
Jan Kerns
Doug Krahmer, Chair
Tracey Liskey, Vice Chair
Sharon Livingston
Laura Masterson
Jerome Rosa
Stephen Van Mouwerik
Dan Arp, Ex-officio Member
Katy Coba, ODA Director


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Download entire ODA Biennial Report (6.8 MB pdf)​ 
  
Request a printed copy of the ODA Biennial Report 
ODA Information Office 
635 Capitol St. NE 
Salem, OR 97301-2532 
Phone: 503-986-4550 
Email: info@oda.state.or.us  

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