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Livestock

Brands

Who Must Comply? 

Although brands are not required in Oregon, the law does mandate an inspection of all cattle, both branded and unbranded, before being hauled out of state; before being sold at an auction; at the time of change of ownership; and before slaughter. The responsibility for recording brands and inspecting livestock belongs to the Oregon Department of Agriculture, Animal Identification Program. The department recommends that livestock owners use brands because they serve as a deterrent to theft and a recovery tool. If you elect to brand your livestock, you must record the brand with the department. It is unlawful to brand livestock with an unrecorded brand.

Recording a brand

If you are interested in applying for a new livestock brand, you must submit your request in writing, along with a $25.00 per brand location fee. You may submit the fee with a letter of request (which contains the drawings) or use the official livestock brand request form. The form is available from your local brand inspector, at livestock auction markets, online, or it can be sent to you by fax, email, or regular mail.

Web oregon.gov/ODA/AHID/livestock_id/brand_app2.pdf​

Send the written request and fee to:

Oregon Department of Agriculture
State Brand Recorder
PO Box 4395, Unit 17
Portland OR 97208

Note: The fee to research and record a brand is $25.00 per brand location, per species (cattle, horse, and sheep), plus a prorated share of the renewal fee. Livestock owners must re-record their brands every four years. Renewal notices are mailed in September. Rerecording a brand costs $100.00 per location for cattle and horse brands and $40.00 per location for sheep brands.

Inspections

During an ownership inspection, a livestock inspector will note the breed and sex of your animal, as well as any ear and flesh marks and brands. As part of the ownership determination, the inspector may also check ownership documents such as bills of sale, registration papers, out-of-state brand inspection papers, and affidavits. Anyone transporting cattle within Oregon must have a completed Oregon transportation certificate, available from brand inspectors, auction markets, the Animal Identification Program, or local printers in some areas.

Exemptions

A physical inspection by an Oregon Department of Agriculture inspector is required unless the seller obtains an exemption certificate, called an e-certificate. Use of the e-certificate is limited to the sale of 15 or fewer head sold to the same buyer within eight consecutive days. The e-certificate may not be used for out of state shipment. E-certificates are available from brand inspectors, some extension agents and sheriffs, and the Animal Identification Program. One certificate must be completed for each animal.

Fines

Violation of Oregon’s brand law is a class B misdemeanor that can result in a fine of up to $2,500 and/or six months in jail.

Missing livestock

When livestock are missing, notify your local sheriff, the state police, and your local brand inspector or the Animal Identification Program at 503-986-4681

Found animals

If you find livestock, notify the Animal Identification office at 503-986-4681, or the local brand inspector, within five days. You should also notify local law enforcement.

Technical assistance

Oregon Department of Agriculture
State brand recorder
635 Capitol St NE
Salem OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4681
Web oregon.gov/ODA/AHID​


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Caged laying-hen administrative rule

Background 

Numerous studies have shown that decreasing enclosure space allowances for egg-laying hens below a certain range not only reduces the welfare of the hen, but also reduces egg production and increases mortality rates.

Senate Bill (SB) 805 (Oregon Laws 2011, Chapter 436), which was signed into law on June 17, 2011, is intended to transition commercial egg farms in Oregon away from small battery cages to larger cages, and ultimately to enriched colony systems including cage free production systems.

SB 805 directed the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) to adopt rules regulating the manner in which commercial egg producers in Oregon shall confine egg-laying hens in an enclosure. SB 805 also prohibits the sale (distribution) of eggs or egg products into or within Oregon unless the eggs came from hens that were in an enclosure (during the production of the egg) that complies with ODA rules.

Who Must Comply

  • All commercial egg-laying farms in Oregon that have caged egg-laying hens at any one location or in multiple locations
  • Any distributor of eggs or egg products into or within Oregon (other than the retail end-user of shell eggs) in which the eggs or egg products originated from hens confined in an enclosure during the production of the egg
  • Any Oregon purchaser (other than the retail end-user of shell eggs) of eggs or egg products

Requirements

Any owner or operator of a commercial egg-laying farm in Oregon that has caged egg-laying hens at any one location or in multiple locations may not confine an egg-laying hen in an enclosure that fails to comply with the following standards:

  • Any enclosure constructed or otherwise acquired prior to December 31, 2003 must provide a minimum “house average” space allowance of 67 square inches of floor space per hen for white leghorns, and 76 square inches of floor space per hen for brown egg layers.
  • Any enclosure constructed or otherwise acquired after December 31, 2003, but prior to January 1, 2012 must provide a minimum of 67 square inches of floor space per hen for white leghorns, and 76 square inches of floor space per hen for brown egg layers.
  • Any enclosure constructed or otherwise acquired after January 1, 2012 must meet, or be convertible into enclosures that provides a minimum space allowance as follows:
    • Enclosures must provide a minimum of 67 square inches of floor space per hen for white leghorns, and 76 square inches of floor space per hen for brown egg layers.
    • Enclosures must be convertible to an enclosure that allows a minimum of 116.3 square inches of floor space per hen, including nest, and not less than 17.7 inches of height or must allow a minimum of 116.3 square inches of floor space per hen, including nest, and not less than 17.7 inches of height.
  • All commercial egg-laying farms in Oregon that have caged egg-laying hens at any one location or in multiple locations must provide ODA with a “farm business plan” describing the manner by which they intend to comply with the conversion goals outlined in SB 805.
  • Any distributor of eggs or egg products into or within Oregon (other than the retail end-user of shell eggs) in which the eggs or egg products originated from hens confined in an enclosure during the production of the egg, must provide documentation to the ODA that the eggs or egg products originated from hens confined in enclosures compliant with ODA rules.
  • Any Oregon purchaser (other than the retail end-user of shell eggs) of eggs or egg products must maintain receipts or other documentation identifying each and every distributor from whom they received eggs or egg products from for the last three years.
  • As of July 1, 2015, ODA shall inspect commercial farms in Oregon engaged in the production of eggs for the purpose of enforcing the provisions of SB 805 and OAR 603-018-000 through 0025.

Technical Assi​stance

Oregon Department of Agriculture
Internal Services and Consumer Protection Programs
Jason Barber
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4767
Email jbarber@oda.state.or.us​
Web oregon.gov/ODA/MSD/pages/hens.aspx​

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Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs)

In 2001, the Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 2156. The legislation directed the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) to regulate all livestock operations to satisfy both state water quality laws and the federal Clean Water Act. Oregon law now defines CAFOs to include state and federally defined livestock operations including certain animal feeding operations (AFOs). The Oregon CAFO general permit meets the requirements of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), EPA’s current CAFO rule requirements and revised Oregon state statute. Facilities that operate in a highly environmentally sensitive area, use experimental technology, or have compliance issues that will take more than two years to rectify may need to apply for an individual CAFO permit.

Endangered Species Act

The federal CAFO rule (40CFR parts 122, 123, and 412, 7-1-08) was developed in consultation with other federal agencies to be in compliance with the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The permit requires all facilities to develop and implement an animal waste management plan (AWMP). The AWMP lists the best management practices (BMPs) that the facility operator will employ to achieve permit conditions. The BMPs are developed at the federal and state level and are checked against ESA requirements through consultation with the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). The 2008 rule also requires that CAFO permit registrations and AWMPs with substantial modifications be noticed to the public.

Who must comply?

Pursuant to, ORS 468B.050, a permit from the CAFO Program of the Oregon Department of Agriculture is required to construct, install, modify, or operate a CAFO. ODA registers CAFO facilities to five permit categories based on size, time of confinement, and type of manure system. The smallest CAFOs that confine for less than four months (cumulative) during any 12-month period and have dry manure systems are typically exempt from permitting. Those animal feeding operations that are subject to federal regulation (40 CFR 122) are the medium and larger facilities that confine for 45 days or more. ODA offers on-site educational reviews to assist operators with determining if their facility is a CAFO requiring permit registration.

Permits: general, individual

CAFOs that are required to be permitted must apply for coverage under a general permit or an individual permit. Permit registrations are issued through the CAFO Program of the Oregon Department of Agriculture, 503-986-4700. CAFO permits issued under the general permit are valid for the term of the general permit. The current general permit was issued jointly by the Oregon Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) on June 29, 2009, with an expiration date of May 31, 2014.

The permit is an NPDES permit that meets the CAFO regulations adopted by the US Environmental Protection Agency. ODA currently operates the CAFO Program under a memorandum of agreement with DEQ. The permit combines state water quality laws and Federal Clean Water Act regulations to protect both groundwater and surface water.

Most CAFOs will qualify for general permit coverage. Currently the CAFO Program has 545 operations registered to the Oregon CAFO NPDES General Permit and three operations registered to an individual permit.

Depending on size, type of manure system, and location, some CAFOs may require individual permits, which have higher fees and more stringent conditions for water quality protection. Potential developers of new CAFOs should contact the CAFO Program at the Oregon Department of Agriculture (503-986-4700) as early as possible in the planning process to determine permit requirements.

SB 120 New Fee Schedule for CAFOs

The previous CAFO permit fee schedule had been in place for 25 years. During that time, the size, complexity, and the regulatory requirements of CAFO permitted operations have changed. Legislation passed in 2011 increases the annual permit fee paid for registration to the general permit. The new law replaces the $25 annual fee previously charged for each permitted facility with a tiered annual permit fee based on the type and number of animals and is defined by Oregon’s CAFO NPDES General Permit. The tiered system established a $100 fee for small CAFOs, a $200 fee for medium CAFOs, and a $300 fee for large CAFOs.

The annual permit fee covers the period beginning July 1 and ending June 30.

In addition to the fees listed above, a one time permit registration fee of $50 will be charged when the first annual permit fee is collected for registration to the general permit. A permit transfer fee of $50 is charged when a permit is transferred to new owners.

Manure, litter, and process wastewater containment systems

Adequate storage shall be provided which is sufficient to store all manure, litter, and process wastewater during periods it cannot be safely applied to cropland without contaminating waters of the state by runoff, drainage, leaching, etc. All manure, silage pit drainage, wash down waters, contaminated precipitation, and other wastewater shall be contained during winter months and distributed on land for utilization at agronomic application rates during crop growing months. Prior to constructing any wastewater control facilities, detailed plans and specifications must be approved in writing by the Oregon Department of Agriculture. All permit registrants must prepare and submit an Animal Waste Management Plan (AWMP) that describes the waste system(s) and their operation. ODA reviews all AWMPs to ensure they address the Minimum Required Elements of the CAFO Permit AWMP requirement.

Fines

Oregon law (ORS 468.140) enables ODA to assess civil penalties for violation of the terms or conditions of a permit. A penalty of $500/violation/day can be assessed any owner or operator of a CAFO who does not apply for a permit as required by law.

Technical assistance​

Oregon Department of Agriculture
Natural Resources Programs
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4699
Web oregon.gov/ODA/NRD/Pages/cafo_front.aspx

Consultation and design of CAFO facilities, including dairy waste systems, feedlot systems, poultry sheds, AWMP preparation, and other operations, are available through local Soil and Water Conservation District offices, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, the OSU Cooperative Extension Service, and technical service providers.

Important information

If wastewater management plans require construction of a pond with a dam or dike over 10 feet high, or with the holding capacity of more than 9.2 acre feet of water, ODA CAFO program staff work with the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) (503-986-0900) to review and approve the designs to meet the OWRD Dam Safety requirements before construction.

Other resources

The USDA Farm Service Agency and Natural Resources Conservation Service offer cost sharing programs for construction of farm wastewater containment systems, AWMP development, and nutrient management. For information about the cost sharing requirements, contact the state FSA Office, 503-692-6830, ext. 22 or the NRCS office, 503-414-3200.

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Disposing of dead animals

Note: Also see the “Disposal of Solid Waste” section of this handbook.

Any dead domestic animal within . mile of any dwelling, and within . mile of any running stream of water, must be disposed of within 15 hours. The owner may choose to bury it, burn it, move it farther from the dwelling or stream, or have it hauled away by a commercial rendering company or commercial carcass pickup service.

If buried, no part of the body shall be nearer than four feet to the natural surface of the ground and every part of such body shall be covered with quicklime (ORS 601.090(7)).

Exemptions

If the carcass is more than . mile from a running stream of water or more than . mile from any dwelling, and on the owner’s property, the owner is not required to take any action.

Commercial rendering companies

Any company that renders the remains of animals must be licensed by the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ORS 601.030). The department must inspect both the facility and all conveyances used by the company to haul carcasses. All are covered by the single $50.00 annual fee. The license period runs from July 1 to June 30.

Commercial carcass pickup

Individuals who pick up dead animals to be hauled elsewhere for disposal must license each conveying vehicle used for hauling carcasses (ORS 601.080). The license period runs from July 1 to June 30; the fee is $10.00 annually.

Tech​nical assistance

Oregon Department of Agriculture
Animal Health Programs
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4680
Web oregon.gov/ODA/AHID​ 


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Emergency animal disease preparedness

An emergency animal disease (EAD), introduced accidentally by a traveler or intentionally by a terrorist, could have a devastating impact on our country’s economy. Government agencies, livestock owners, and veterinarians are increasing their preparedness in case of an EAD outbreak. Early detection to prevent spread of these very contagious diseases is critical to homeland security. Livestock owners and managers will see the signs of disease first. Recognizing those signs and making a quick decision to call for help can prevent catastrophe.

The following are signs of emergency animal diseases:

  • Sudden unexplained deaths, high fevers, lameness, or abortions
  • Blisters or sores in the mouth, or on the tongue, nose, teats, or feet
  • Slobbering
  • Staggering, falling, circling, or other brain disorder type behaviors
  • Unusual ticks, maggots, or parasites

If you notice any of these signs, call your veterinarian.

Technical assistance 

Oregon Department of Agriculture
State Veterinarian
Brad LeaMaster
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4680
Web oregon.gov/ODA/AHID​

US Department of Agriculture
Area Veterinarian in Charge
Phone 360-753-9430

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Importation of animals

Who must comply?

The importer is responsible for ensuring Oregon’s disease control requirements are met, including tests, vaccinations, inspections and permits.

General import requirements

Oregon requires a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI, iCVI, i.e., “health certificate”) issued less than 30 days before entry and an import permit for most animals including birds.

An import permit is required for all livestock species. Import permits are valid for 15 days, are free of charge, and can be obtained by telephone (503-986-4680).

Dogs, cats, and most pet birds are exempt from the import permit requirement. However, pet birds imported for commercial sale must have a CVI and an import permit.

Tests or vaccinations may also be required. If testing is required, the CVI must include official identification for each animal tested, lab name and location, date sample was taken, accession number, and test results. Tests with results pending are not acceptable.

Federal Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) regulations require livestock that are moved interstate must, unless otherwise exempt, be officially identified and have an iCVI or other official documentation.

Exhibition animals

Livestock brought into the state of Oregon for shows, fairs, and competitions must meet regular requirements as a minimum. Call 503-986-4680 for details.

Family pets

Cats and dogs

Cats and dogs four months or older must have a current rabies vaccination.

Pet birds (psittacines, raptors, etc.)

See “birds” section below. Pet poultry must meet poultry requirements.

Reptiles, amphibians, and fish

Turtles imported for sale must be at least four inches across the carapace. Importing crocodiles and alligators is restricted. Please call ODA for further details. ODA has no other requirements for importation of reptiles, amphibians, or fish. Check with local and county government agencies and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (503-872-5260) for their requirements for importing or holding these animals.

Cattle of US origin

Brucellosis vaccination

All female cattle over four months old must have been officially vaccinated against brucellosis. Oregon cattle producers may request mature vaccination of female cattle over 12 months of age if they intend to keep them in their herd for breeding or dairy purposes. They must contact their local veterinarian to make arrangements for mature vaccination. Other unvaccinated females over 12 months old may only go directly to slaughter or to a registered dry feedlot for feeding and then to slaughter. Importers may also apply for an exemption for unvaccinated females over 12 months of age for breeding purposes, if they are of proven genetic advantage.

Brucellosis test

Brucellosis test is not required for cattle imported from “brucellosis-free” areas or states. One negative test less than 30 days prior to entry is required for cattle imported from areas that are not considered brucellosis-free.

Tuberculosis test

Tuberculosis test is required for all female dairy cattle over two months of age. Tuberculosis test is not required for beef cattle imported from “TB-free” areas or states. Call for details for cattle from areas or states with less than “TB-free” status.

Cattle originating in Mexico or Canada

There are additional requirements for these cattle. Call 503-986-4680 for details.

Other bovine

American bison are not required to have a brucellosis vaccination, but must have a negative test for brucellosis if eight months or older. Vaccinated females under 24 months of age are exempt from this test requirement. A negative TB test may be required for bison. Call 503-986-4680 for details.

Yak, water buffalo, Cape buffalo, and other bovine species must have a negative test for brucellosis within 30 days before entry and a negative test for TB within 60 days before entry. Since current brucellosis vaccines are licensed only for cattle, vaccination against brucellosis is not recommended for these species.

Horses, mules, asses, and other equine

All equidae entering Oregon must have a certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI), an import permit number, and a negative test for equine infectious anemia (EIA) no more than six months before entry. There are exemptions for the following:

  • Nursing foals under six months of age which are traveling with negative tested dam
  • All Washington-resident horses

Swine

All porcine species (including project pigs, pet pigs, hunting boars, etc.) are included in the regulations for swine. The CVI must be issued less than 30 days before entry into Oregon and must state the swine have not been fed raw garbage and have not been vaccinated against pseudorabies. All breeder swine must have been vaccinated for erysipelas and leptospirosis according to vaccine manufacturer’s directions. Feral swine may not be imported.

Brucellosis testing requirements are based on official status of state or herd of origin. Call 503-986-4680 for details. ODA follows United States Department of Agriculture, uniform methods and rules for eradication of these diseases.

Sheep and goats

The CVI must contain the following statement from the issuing veterinarian, “These animals have no known exposure to scrapie.” CVI for sheep must include official individual scrapie ear tag numbers for each animal listed. CVI for goats must include individual official scrapie ear tag numbers or registration certificates plus official tattoo numbers for each animal. Animals imported into the state of Oregon for feeding purposes and are less than 18 months of age are exempt from the individual identification requirement. However, they still require a CVI and import permit.

Wildlife and nontraditional livestock

Bison

  • Brucellosis vaccination is not required.
  • Brucellosis test is required, regardless of status of state of origin, less than 30 days before entry for unvaccinated bison (male or female) eight months or older and for vaccinated females over 24 months.
  • Tuberculosis test is not required if from “TB accredited free” state. One negative test for TB required less than 60 days before entry, if from less-than “TB accredited free” state.

Camelids

Individual identification is required.

  • Llama, alpaca, vicuna, and guanaco
    • No testing is required.
  • Camels, bactrian or dromedary
    • Brucellosis test is required less than 30 days prior to entry.
    • Tuberculosis test is required less than 60 days prior to entry.

Cervidae

Importation of cervidae is prohibited by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. For further information call 503-872-5260.

Other (Water buffalo, yak, antelope, etc.)

  • Brucellosis vaccination is not required.
  • Brucellosis test is required less than 30 days before entry.
  • Tuberculosis test is required less than 60 days before entry.

Birds

Poultry

  • Avian species eligible for the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) (except ratites) must have a CVI, import permit, and a negative test for pullorum disease.
  • Poultry (except ratites) from NPIP flocks may be shipped direct from farm of origin on USDA Form VS 9-3 with no other requirements.

Pet birds

  • No CVI or import permit is required for family pet birds.
  • Pet poultry must meet poultry requirements.
  • Pet birds imported for sale must have CVI and import permit.

Ratites

  • Ratites must have a CVI, import permit, and negative tests for pullorum disease and avian influenza.
  • Each bird must have permanent identification (leg band, wing band, or microchip) that must be listed on the CVI.
  • Isolate and observe for disease for 14 days after arrival.
  • Ratites from NPIP flocks are exempt from the pullorum test but must meet all other requirements.

International imports

Contact the USDA Animal and Plant Health and Inspection Service in Maryland at 301-734-8364, for information on importing animals from outside​ the US.

Technical assistance

Oregon Department of Agriculture
State Veterinarian
Brad LeaMaster
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4680
Web oregon.gov/ODA/AHID/Pages/animal_health/main.aspx


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Interstate movement of cattle and pasture to pasture permits

Who must comply?

Anyone shipping cattle across state lines must ensure those cattle meet both state and federal requirements. This usually includes obtaining a certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI, i.e. “health certificate”) and may include brucellosis and/or tuberculosis testing. Contact state of destination for details of tests or other requirements.

Pasture to pasture permit option

A special Pasture to Pasture program exists for shipping breeding cattle herds across state lines for grazing purposes without a change of ownership. All cattle on the pasture to pasture permit must be returned to the state of origin after the grazing season.

The requirements for certain testing and a certificate of veterinary inspection are waived if the owner applies for and receives a pasture to pasture permit before movement across state lines. This would apply whether the cattle are moving from Oregon to another bordering state for pasture and returning to Oregon, or moving from another state to Oregon for pasture and returning to that state at the end of the grazing season. Cattle moved on a pasture to pasture permit may not commingle with other cattle while out of state.

Application process

The owner must apply for a pasture to pasture permit with the department of agriculture in the state of origin at least two weeks before the proposed movement. The application is checked for completeness and approved by the department. After approval by the state of origin, the application is forwarded to the state of destination for approval. After approval by both states, a copy is forwarded to the owner and the animals may be shipped.

Record keeping

A copy of the approved pasture to pasture permit must accompany each shipment of cattle. The department keeps records of previous years’ pasture permits for comparison with current applications.

Restrictions

The pasture to pasture permit is valid for a maximum of eight months; this period of time may vary depending on the state of destination. Check with the department of agriculture in the destination state for details. Any deviation from the permit must have prior approval from the respective state department of agriculture.

Technical as​sistance

Oregon Department of Agriculture
Animal Health Programs 
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4680
Email ahid-office-manager@oda.state.or.us​
Web oregon.gov/ODA/AHID 

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Wolf Depredation Compensation and Financial Assistance Grant

With the return of gray wolves to Oregon, conflicts with livestock and working dogs have occurred. The ranching and farming industry are important components of the Oregon economy. As in other western states with wolf populations, some livestock producers will be affected financially due to direct losses of livestock from wolf depredations.

On June 24, 2011, the Oregon Legislature passed House Bill (HB) 3560, and appropriated $100,000 of state general fund for implementation purposes. HB 3560 directed the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) to establish and implement a Wolf Depredation Compensation and Financial Assistance Grant Program. Through this program, ODA provides pass-through grants to counties to establish and implement county wolf depredation compensation programs of their own, under which the following apply:

  • Compensation can be paid to persons for livestock or working dogs killed or injured due to wolf depredation.
  • Financial assistance can be provided to persons who implement livestock management and/or nonlethal wolf deterrent techniques designed to discourage wolf depredation of livestock.
  • Compensation can be paid to persons for livestock or working dogs that are missing due to wolf depredation.
  • Compensation can be paid to counties to cover allowable expenses incurred while implementing a wolf depredation compensation program in their county.

ODA’s Wolf Depredation Compensation Grant Program supports Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan by proactively minimizing wolf-livestock conflicts and assisting livestock producers who experience wolf-related livestock losses.

Technical assistance

Oregon Department of Agriculture
Internal Services and Consumer Protection Programs
Jason Barber
635 Capitol St NE
Salem, OR 97301-2532
Phone 503-986-4767
Email jbarber@oda.state.or.us
Web oregon.gov/ODA/MSD/pages/wolf.aspx​ 

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