Text Size:   A+ A- A   •   Text Only
Find     
Site Image
Data Information and Reporting for Indicator C.b.
Oregon Indicator of Sustainable Forest Management C.b.
Timber harvest trends compared to planned and projected harvest levels and the potential to grow timber
 

Forestry Program for Oregon Strategy C:
Indicator C.b. is one of two indicators that will measure progress towards achieving Forestry Program for Oregon Strategy C: Maintain and enhance the productive capacity of Oregon's forests to improve the economic well-being of Oregon's communities.
 
Quick Links -
Other Indicators for
Stategy C Reporting
________
 
 
 

Target* and Desired Trend
Oregon timber harvest levels are 90 to 110 percent of planned and projected levels (Oregon Progress Board target for Oregon Benchmark 83) and the potential to grow timber is stable or increasing.
 
*Note: Targets are specific socially-preferred outcomes or results for the indicators.  At this time, targets have been established only for indicators under Strategy C.

At-a-Glance: Condition, Trend, and Information

Condition:Trend:Information:
Symbol for Poor Condition
Symbol for Deteriorating Trend
Symbol for Adequate Information
Poor 
Deteriorating 
Adequate 

Why is this indicator important?
A photo of helicopter logging in the Tillamook State Forest
Helicopter logging in the Tillamook State Forest
Maintaining timber harvest levels while also meeting other environmental, economic, and social needs is very important to Oregonians. A viable primary forest processing industry contributes  to state and local economies, provides raw materials for secondary processing, and helps preserve financial incentives for preventing forest land from being converted to other more developed uses.
 
In addition to sustaining state and local economies and providing wood products required by society, timber harvests can help provide environmental and social benefits.  Managing tree stocking can enhance wildlife habitat and be part of a management program to help keep fire risk and insect and disease infestations within the historical range of variation.

What does this indicator tell us about sustainable forest management?
Condition:

 Symbol for Poor Condition
Poor

Oregon timber harvests have been between 2.7 and 4.5 billion board feet over the last several years.   This is well below the 5.0 billion board feet considered to be sustainable under current policies and regulations.  Both public and private harvests for the last decade and the most recent five years are sustainable.  Private harvest levels have been at approximately sustainable levels over the last several decades. With an economic crisis and severe recession beginning in 2007, timber harvests from private land in Oregon plummeted.  The decline was most severe on non-industrial private owners, with timber harvests in 2009 only 22 percent of 2006 non-industrial harvests.  Public harvest levels have been between 52 percent and 94 percent of sustainable levels over the last decade, and were 73 percent of sustainable levels in 2009.
 
Public harvests are well below target levels even though public sustainable target levels have been reduced several times to account for changing plans and policies.  Difficulties in planning, offering, and harvesting timber sales on federal lands have resulted from budget constraints and the continued threat of litigation. Public lands are now harvesting approximately 11 percent of public forest’s potential for growing timber.  Private forests in 2009-2010 are currently harvesting approximately 55 percent of private forests' potential for growing timber and 62 percent of sustainable levels under current policies and regulations.

Trend:

 Symbol for Deteriorating Trend
Deteriorating
Oregon timber harvests have been declining over the last five years. This trend may not quickly reverse itself because of poor timber markets, and because of low timber sale levels from Oregon's federal forests. Timber markets are not expected to significantly improve until U.S. housing satarts and nonresidential construction rebound. Current forecasts show these markets starting to improve in 2011, but not approaching historical levels until 2014.
 
Family forestland owners are very price-responsive and their timber harvests have been declining following declines in stumpage prices related to a weak housing market.  Demand for housing is expected to recover slowly and it is uncertain if stumpage prices will then rebound to previous levels.
 
Harvests from Oregon’s federal forests have remained relatively stable, albeit stable at historically low levels for federal forests. Federal harvests have recovered from their record 2001 lows, but still remain well below planned levels.
 

Information

 Symbol for Adequate Information
Adequate
Statewide and county-level information by ownership group is available for this indicator.  The data are current and regularly updated from reliable referenced sources by the Oregon Department of Forestry.  More aggregated information is available for years 1849-1961.

Report: Actual versus Sustainable Timber Harvests on Public Lands
Chart showing Actual versus Sustainable Timber Harvests on Public Lands
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Printable chart [PDF; 82 KB]
 

Report: Actual versus Sustainable Timber Harvests on Private Lands
Chart showing Actual versus Sustainable Timber Harvests on Private Lands
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Printable chart [PDF; 82 KB]
 

Initial Roundtable evaluation of Indicator C.b.

Metrics and Data Sources


Metric
Data Source
Annual timber harvest volume compared to the volume expected under current plans and the potential to grow wood, public landsOregon Department of Forestry
Bureau of Land Management
U.S. Forest Service
Annual timber harvest volume compared to the volume expected under current and forecasted economic conditions and the potential to grow wood, private landsOregon Department of Forestry
Bureau of Land Management
U.S. Forest Service

Related State, National, or International Indicators
  • Montreal Process: Criterion 2 - Maintenance of the productive capacity of forest ecosystems:  2003 Indicator 13: Annual removal of wood products compared to the volume determined to be sustainable; 2010 Indicator: Total growing stock and annual increment of both merchantable and non-merchantable tree species in forests available for wood production; and 2010 Indicator 13: Annual harvest of wood products by volume and as a percentage of net growth or sustained yield
  • Heinz Center: Timber harvest, timber growth and harvest
  • Oregon Benchmarks: Environment:  83A: Actual timber harvest as a percent of potential harvest levels under current plans and policies, public lands; 83B: Actual timber harvest as a percent of potential harvest levels under current plans and policies, private lands
  • Oregon State of the Environment Report: Timber harvest relative to sustainable levels (reference: estimated sustainable levels in plans and management intentions)