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e-Guide: Project Scoping | Programming | Delivery
Overview
The Project Scoping & Delivery Processes
 
Project Scoping begins with the idea of a project (i.e., when a NEED has been identified through regional or local planning), and ends when enough information has been gathered to make a decision on how to proceed.
 
Scoping is a very important step for determining environmental issues and looking for early opportunities for flexible design aimed at either avoiding issues or determining very early alternatives for NEPA processes.
 
 
Guidance
 
PD-02
(Operational Notice for Project Delivery)
 
STIP Scoping Summary Report
 
Environmental Baseline Criteria
 
Environmental Baseline Reports
 
Project Delivery Guidebook (Scoping)
 
Project Delivery Guidebook (Entire)
 
Project Delivery Unit Website   
 
Each region uses a slightly different process, but in general, the project leaders, local agency liaisons, construction project managers or special program coordinators work with the STIP coordinators to assemble the  prospectus (Parts 1 and 2) and then send to the RECs, who prepare the environmental portion, or ‘Part 3’ of the Prospectus, and then submit the entire Prospectus to management for approval.
 
 
Project Programming
 
The State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP)—the culmination of transportation planning processes—starts the Project Programming phase. The STIP is a four-year project funding and scheduling list, comprising all the transportation projects and programs seeking federal funding in Oregon.    Agencies involved in preparing the STIP include cities, counties, MPOs, ODOT, transit agencies, and the Governor’s Office. Public Involvement starts with STIP development.  
 
A scope, schedule, and budget get assigned to each project once Project Scoping has been completed. For RECs and EPMs, it is important to form a close relationship with the Project Leader or Planner for each STIP project or program, and continually strive to work within the established scope, schedule and budget.    Project Leaders typically handle these areas, but it is important for RECs and EPMs to know the various tools available for tracking, scheduling, or programming environmental work.
 
 
Programming Tools for RECs/EPMs
 
Project Delivery Work Planning (PDWP)
the "electronic prospectus" (Parts 1, 2, and 3)
 
Project Tracking Tool
(primarily for project leaders, but may also be valuable for RECs or EPMs—internal ODOT only)
 
 
NEW!  Guidance in the Works
 
The following link to the Project Delivery webpage describes statewide initiatives currently being developed that will involve RECs and EPMs with the goal of improving many of the Project Scoping and Programming processes.
 
New Initiatives to Improve Project Delivery (Website link) 
  
Contacts - Project Scoping | Programming | Delivery
 
FOR STATEWIDE PROCEDURAL GUIDANCE
 
*Contact the staff listed below within the appropriate Section: 
 
      *Statewide NEPA Program Coordinator
      *Geo-Environmental Section Manager
 
Project Delivery Unit at 503-986-3473
Geo-Environmental Section  (Salem)  503-986-4200

GeoEnvironmental Homepage
 
FOR REGION PROJECT DELIVERY GUIDANCE  
 
*Contact the staff listed below within the appropriate Region:
 
      *Region Environmental Coordinator (REC)
      *Region NEPA Project Manager (EPM)
 
 
Portland
Salem 
Roseburg
Bend
La Grande
503-731-8200
503-986-2600
541-774-6299
541-388-6032
541-963-3177


 
FOR LOCAL AGENCY PROJECT GUIDANCE  
Local Agency Liaisons & Program Coordinators (includes all Region LALs)
 
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Please Note: The e-Guide  site is under continual construction  to bring you the most current guidance possible. Your patience and feedback are appreciated!