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SPR 770

Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation

 

Project Coordinator:
Matthew Mabey
Research Agency:
Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
Peter Dusicka
Start Date for ODOT:
December 16, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT:
September 30, 2016
 
OVERVIEW:
The seismic risk used for bridge design and retrofit is defined by hazard maps of ground
acceleration values. To generate the maps, an algorithm called a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard
Analysis (PSHA) is used to combine multiple regional sources of ground shaking. For
Oregon, one key source of ground shaking in the PSHA is from the Cascadia Subduction Zone
(CSZ). A CSZ earthquake can have significantly different ground motion as a standalone event than what is captured in the values derived from the PSHA.
 
 
Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation Criteria of Bridges Work Plan
 
 
 
 
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SPR 775

Titanium for Strengthening Existing Reinforced Concrete Bridges
 Project Coordinator:
 Matthew Mabey
 Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Chris Higgins
 Start Date at ODOT:
 July 1, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
 
Overview:
The characteristics of titanium reinforcement, particularly its ability to be bent, open up possible cost savings for a wide range of strengthening situations.  Three areas have been identified for further research to exploit the advantages of titanium reinforcement for strengthening:
 
• Develop a splicing method that allows supplemental reinforcing bars to be deployed along the full length of girders including through the intermediate diaphragms that protrude from most beams.
• Develop an unbonded strengthening detail that eliminates the need to cut grooves into the concrete surface, thereby reducing labor costs, epoxy material costs, and construction time.
• Develop methods to apply exterior titanium bars to strengthen girders with inadequate transverse reinforcement.
 
 
 
 
 
 

SPR 776

 Quantifying Noise Impacts from ODOT Aggregate Source Operations
 Project Coordinator:
 Kira Glover-Cutter
 Research Agency:
 SLR International Corporation
 Principal Investigator:
 Jessica Stark
 Start Date at ODOT:
August 21, 2015
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 30, 2016
 
Overview:
The sage grouse as “endangered” by US Fish and Wildlife has the potential for significant impact to ODOT aggregate source operations.  The data collected in this research will assist in developing maps and other information and be used by ODOT environmental staff to work with ODFW to establish the area and degree of impact that ODOT aggregate production has on sage grouse. 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 777

Chip Seal Design and Specifications
 Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
 Research Agency:
 Iowa State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Douglas Gransberg/Chris Williams
 Start Date at ODOT:
 July 18, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 July 31, 2016
 
 
Overview:
 
The RFP defines the problem as a need to “revisit” ODOT’s chip seal design methodology and specifications using common chip seal design methodologies found elsewhere in the US and internationally as a benchmark to identify potential approaches to improve the ODOT chip seal program. ODOT requires a rational chip seal design methodology based on quantitative measurements that can be successfully replicated by contractors in the field and which does not demand the current amount of professional judgment to be successful.
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 778

 Safety Effectiveness of Pedestrian Crossing Enhancements
 Project Coordinator:
Josh Roll
 Research Agency:
Portland State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Chris Monsere/Miguel Figliozzi
 Start Date at ODOT:
 September 18, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
 
Overview:
ODOT’s Tech Services Branch is implementing a pedestrian safety countermeasure program which will direct HSIP funding toward pedestrian safety counter measures. This research will carefully consider the type of enhancement, the geometry, the surrounding land uses, and pedestrian/vehicle exposures. The results of this research will provide decision-makers with a valuable tool to guide future PCE deployments. The results of this research can also set the foundation for future cost/benefit analysis of PCEs.
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 779

 Risk Factors for Pedestrian and Bicycle Crashes
 Project Coordinator:
 Mark Joerger
 Research Agency:
 Portland State University/Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Chris Monsere/Haizhong Wang
 Start Date at ODOT:
 November 10, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 August 31, 2016
 
Overview:
Oregon has identified pedestrian and bicycle crashes as a primary focus area for investing infrastructure funding and has marked approximately $4 million in the All Roads Safety Program to help address this key need. Preliminary work towards this problem, ODOT TRS hired a consultant in Spring 2013 to prepare a plan and objectives to match effective safety systemic infrastructure countermeasures with potential high risk locations for improvements.
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 780

Strategies to Increase the Service Life of Existing Bridge Decks
 Project Coordinator:
 Matthew Mabey
 Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Burkan Isgar
 Start Date at ODOT:
 July 1, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
 
 
Overview:
 
This research is to provide ODOT with a protocol to select bridges for its ongoing bridge deck treatment operations using quantitative tools that are practical and quick. The quantitative tools will be in the form of concrete SR measurements, time-to damage predictions, and when necessary, strategically-selected chloride depth profiles.
 
It is anticipated that the Bridge Design and Drafting Manual will be revised to detail acceptable corrosion test methods for concrete structures and identify corrosion mitigation actions for different levels of chloride exposure.
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
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SPR 781

Improving Adaptive/Responsive Signal Control Performance: Implications of Non-Invasive Detection and Legacy Timing Practices
 
 Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
 Research Agency:
 Northern Arizona University
 Principal Investigator:
 Edward Smaglik
 Start Date at ODOT:
 September 10, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 10, 2016
 
 
Overview:
 
Current ODOT standards of practice for purchase, installation, layout and timing of non-invasive systems requires updating.  More realistic costs, installation practices, detection zone layouts and timing parameters are needed in order to capture the full measure of the more powerful data driven traffic signal controller systems currently being deployed throughout the State of Oregon.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 782

HMAC Layer Adhesion Through Tack Coat

 Project Coordinator:
 Norris Shippen
 Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
 Principal Investigator:
 Erdem Coleri
 Start Date at ODOT:
 December 9, 2014
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 August 31, 2016

 

Overview:

Tack coats are the asphaltic emulsions applied between pavement lifts to provide adequate bond between the two surfaces. The adhesive bond between the two layers helps the pavement system to behave as a monolithic structure and improves the structural integrity. The absence, inadequacy or failure of this bond result in a significant reduction in the shear strength resistance of the pavement structure and makes the system more vulnerable to many distress types, such as cracking, rutting, and potholes (Tashman et al. 2006).  

 

 

HMAC Layer Adhesion Through Tack Coat Work Plan

 

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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