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Active Projects II

SPR 769

Safe and Effective Speed Reductions for Freeway Work Zones Phase 2 

 
Project Coordinator:
Jon Lazarus
Research Agency:
Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
John Gambatese
Start Date for ODOT:
June 1, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT:
February 28, 2015
 
OVERVIEW:
In response to requests from the Associated General Contractors (AGC) Oregon-Columbia
Chapter, ODOT began a research study in FY2013 (SPR-751) to look for ways to safely reduce
speeds through work zones on preservation projects taking place on high-speed freeways.
Freeway preservation projects typically require traffic lane reductions to allow workers to
rehabilitate worn pavements. During lane closures, work activities take place immediately
adjacent to live traffic – traffic that is often travelling at high speeds. ODOT is interested in
strategies to safely reduce these speeds and subsequently improve the overall safety of the work
zone for drivers and for workers.
Phase 1 of this study (SPR 751) included two paving projects, one on I-84 near The Dalles and
one on I-5 just north of the McKenzie River Bridge. On each project, different traffic control
measures (TCMs) were implemented and speed data was collected both prior to and within the
work zone.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The proposed research comprises augmenting the SPR-751 study to address the issues and needs
identified by the TAC. This proposal includes conducting two additional case study projects at a
reduced cost. The additional case studies will be on paving projects similar to SPR-751, and
include a reduced total number of treatments focused on the following specific traffic control
measures: “SPEED 50” signs, PCMS signs on a roller(s) or a stationary trailer(s), and radar
speed reader trailers. As with SPR-751, the overall goal of the proposed research is to assist
ODOT with enhancing the safety of work zones on high-speed roadways.
 
Safe and Effective Speed Reductions for Freeway Work Zones Phase 2 Work Plan

QUARTERLY REPORTS
FY 14
FY 15
 
 
 
 qtr. 3
 
 
 
 
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SPR 770

Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation

 

Project Coordinator:
Steve Soltesz
Research Agency:
Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
Peter Dusicka
Start Date for ODOT:
December 16, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT:
March 31, 2016
 
OVERVIEW:
The seismic risk used for bridge design and retrofit is defined by hazard maps of ground
acceleration values. To generate the maps, an algorithm called a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard
Analysis (PSHA) is used to combine multiple regional sources of ground shaking. Each source
has a different intensity, probability of occurrence, and distance to a specific location. For
Oregon, one key source of ground shaking in the PSHA is from the Cascadia Subduction Zone
(CSZ); however, a CSZ earthquake can have significantly different ground motion as a
standalone event than what is captured in the values derived from the PSHA.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The objective of this project is to provide ODOT with the best rational estimate of ground
acceleration values for designing and retrofitting bridges.
 
Impact of Cascadia Earthquake on Seismic Evaluation Criteria of Bridges Work Plan
 

QUARTERLY REPORTS
 
FY 14
FY 15
 
 
 
 ​qtr. 3
 
 ​qtr. 4
 
 
 
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SPR 771

Risk Factors Associated with High Potential for Serious Crashes

 

Project Coordinator:
Mark Joerger
Research Agency:
Montana State University
Principal Investigator:
Ahmed Al-Kaisy/David Veneziano
Start Date for ODOT:
November 21, 2013
Completion Date for ODOT:
May 26, 2015
 
OVERVIEW:
Crashes are random events and consequently, can occur at any location along the roadway. On
roadways with higher traffic volumes, the more frequent occurrence of crashes allows for the
direct identification of high crash locations using historical data. However, on local roads, crash
occurrence, particularly fatal and serious injury crashes, is less frequent. This makes it difficult
to identify trends and treat hazardous sites based on historical data. Geometric, traffic and other
features may lend themselves toward crashes potentially happening in spot locations. Therefore,
an approach to identifying these types of risk factors on low volume roads is necessary.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The proposed research will identify risk factors and features that contribute to crashes along low
volume roads and the cost effectiveness of countermeasures to address them. Research objectives
include:
Identify risk factors and features that contribute to crash occurrence and which can be corrected
by selected low cost countermeasures, with a specific focus on low and moderate volume roads
with sporadic crash occurrence.
Develop a risk index of different factors and features that practitioners should look for and that
can be addressed using selected low cost countermeasures along low and moderate volume
roads.
Establish the cost effectiveness/thresholds for the low cost countermeasures that are selected for
use in addressing risk factors on low to moderate volume roads.
Conduct limited case studies to demonstrate the use of the identified risk factors and application
of the cost effectiveness thresholds that are developed.
 
Risk Factors Associated with High Potential for Serious Crashes Work Plan

QUARTERLY REPORTS
 
FY 14
FY 15
 
 
 qtr. 3
 
 
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SPR 772

Investigation of Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Technologies

Project Coordinator:
Lyn Cornell
Research Agency:
Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
Miguel Figliozzi 
Start Date for ODOT:
October 1, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
June 30, 2016 
 

OVERVIEW:

The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) maintains a statewide license to traffic signal controller software (Northwest Signal Voyage) which has a red clearance (all-red) extension feature to dynamically extend the red clearance if a vehicle is detected that has or will likely run the red signal indication. This smart, adaptive red clearance treatment provides additional safety protection when risks of a RLR event is high, but is passive in other cases, thus having almost no impact on intersection capacity & delay. The cost is very low to implement this smart intelligent transportation system (ITS) treatment and over 500 intersections currently have controllers with this software feature available to them (and that number is growing). While widely available in Oregon, little is known about the impacts of this feature on intersection safety or best practice for detector placement and settings to maximize the safety/crash reduction benefits of the red clearance extension feature. Preliminary research suggests that detector placement is critical to achieving optimal benefits. This research would develop quantitative information about the safety effects of red clearance extensions from simulated data and available empirical data. The there is a clear opportunity to leverage the controller and software investments to larger safety gains and provide ODOT the opportunity to provide leadership on an issue of national importance. The value of this research is potentially high. 

OBJECTIVE:

 The overall goal of the proposed research is to quantify the safety performance of alternative red clearance extension detection and controller settings to mitigate RLR crashes at intersections in Oregon. More specifically, the objective is to determine where detection zones should be placed so as to maximize RLR crash avoidance potential (detection further away from the stop bar), while minimizing the likelihood of false red light extensions (extension is triggered for a stopping vehicle), and to establish optimal timing parameters for various objectives. 

Investigation of Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Technologies Work Plan

 

QUARTERLY REPORT

FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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SPR 773

Optimal Timing and Detection Practices for Red Clearance Extensions
 
Project Coordinator:
Mark Joerger
Research Agency:
Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
David Hurwitz
Start Date for ODOT:
July 1, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
March 1, 2016
 
OVERVIEW:
The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) maintains a statewide license to traffic signal controller software (Northwest Signal Voyage) which has a red clearance (all-red) extension feature to dynamically extend the red clearance if a vehicle is detected that has or will likely run the red signal indication. This smart, adaptive red clearance treatment provides additional safety protection when risks of a RLR event is high, but is passive in other cases, thus having almost no impact on intersection capacity & delay. The cost is very low to implement this smart intelligent transportation system (ITS) treatment and over 500 intersections currently have controllers with this software feature available to them (and that number is growing). While widely available in Oregon, little is known about the impacts of this feature on intersection safety or best practice for detector placement and settings to maximize the safety/crash reduction benefits of the red clearance extension feature. Preliminary research suggests that detector placement is critical to achieving optimal benefits. This research would develop quantitative information about the safety effects of red clearance extensions from simulated data and available empirical data. The there is a clear opportunity to leverage the controller and software investments to larger safety gains and provide ODOT the opportunity to provide leadership on an issue of national importance. The value of this research is potentially high.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The overall goal of the proposed research is to quantify the safety performance of alternative red clearance extension detection and controller settings to mitigate RLR crashes at intersections in Oregon. More specifically, the objective is to determine where detection zones should be placed so as to maximize RLR crash avoidance potential (detection further away from the stop bar), while minimizing the likelihood of false red light extensions (extension is triggered for a stopping vehicle), and to establish optimal timing parameters for various objectives.  
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORT
FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 774

Road User Charge Economic Analysis
Project Coordinator:
 Tony Knudson
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 B. Starr McMullen/Haizhong Wang
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 29, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
 December 31, 2016
 
OVERVIEW:
 
The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) relies on the fuels tax to fund road infrastructure maintenance, operations, and improvements. The fuels tax has been a reliable source of transportation revenue for decades, but increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and other factors are expected to result in permanent funding shortfalls, however, fuel tax revenues are a significant share of state highway fund revenues.  Therefore, Oregon’s highway system would be in jeopardy as the gasoline tax revenues necessary to maintain, preserve and modernize the system slowly but steadily drained away. Oregon began thinking about this issue in 2001, when the state legislature formed the Road User Fee Task Force (RUFTF) to explore new ways of funding the state’s transportation system. Oregon has been the national leader exploring a new funding system - a road user-based charge (RUC) - to replace the fuels tax.   A road usage charge is a per-mile fee that replaces the state fuel tax and thus helps stem the downward trend in highway fund revenues now being lost due to the increasing numbers of highly fuel-efficient vehicles in the vehicle fleet. In response to the RUFTF’s direction, ODOT has completed two pilot projects to test how this new system could be implemented. In 2007, ODOT completed its first pilot project, which resulted in valuable lessons that were applied to the second pilot project, completed in early 2013.
The purpose of this study is to assess the economic impacts of various alternative road user charge structures and implementation proposals on stakeholders in the state of Oregon. 
 
OBJECTIVE:
The objective of this research is to provide ODOT with up to date information on the economic impact of various RUC alternatives on the stakeholders in the state of Oregon.  This information can then be used to make informed decisions on which VMT fee structure to adopt in the transition between the current finance structure and a sustainable finance structure for the future.  Previous work in the area was limited by the small Oregon sample of households included in the NHTS data set.  The newly available OHAS opens the opportunity to explore the impacts on Oregon households and geographic regions with much greater precision.  Further, the OHAS data set provides a much larger sample of alternative fuel, hybrid, and fuel-efficient vehicles than included in past data sets. 
This proposed research project will analyze the economic impact of various road user charge rate structures and implementation strategies. Possibilities that could be explored include: (1) A simple flat rate structure that applies to all vehicles. (2) A transition VMT fee structure that could, at first, retain the gasoline tax for existing vehicles but impose a VMT fee structure on new vehicles starting in a specified year (the VMT fee could be either a flat fee or a vehicle efficiency based fee) 3) An alternative transition VMT fee imposed only on existing fleet vehicles with mpg>50, or >40 or >30.  These fees structures could be supplemented at the state or local level with vehicle or facility specific rates.  Hybrid or transition systems such as 2) or 3) would probably involve higher calculation, storage, and other associated implementation costs.
In all cases the impact on identified socio-economic groups and regions will be assessed as well as the impact on financial stability of the system.
Road User Charge Economic Analysis Work Plan
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
 
FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 775

Titanium for Strengthening Existing Reinforced Concrete Bridges
 
Project Coordinator:
 Norris Shippen
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Chris Higgins
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 1, 2014 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016 
 
 
 
 
OVERVIEW:
Oregon has many reinforced concrete bridges that were built in the 1950’s. The bridges from this era commonly have poor reinforcing details such as longitudinal reinforcing bars terminating in areas under stress, inadequate bar splices, and insufficient vertical reinforcement. Consequently, these older ODOT bridges often are evaluated as deficient and require remediation. It is anticipated that on-going load rating and evolving loading requirements will uncover many deficient bridges for years to come.

Current practice and previous ODOT research provide design options for strengthening. A common option is to bond carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) strips either on the surface or just below the surface. The method relies solely on the adhesive bond to transfer stresses to the CFRP; consequently, the full strength of the CFRP is never utilized because the concrete near the bond fails first. To compensate for the relatively weak bond, more strips are installed to distribute stresses across more bond surfaces. If space is not available for more strips, a more elaborate strengthening scheme may be deployed.

In a current ODOT-funded research project, a titanium alloy bar has been developed that is lightweight and has high-strength and high ductility and is impervious to environmental degradation. The bar can be produced over a wide range of sizes. Unlike CFRP, a key feature of this material is that it can be bent. Consequently, the ends of the titanium bar can be bent to ninety degrees and embedded deep into a beam that needs strengthening. This mechanical anchorage overcomes the problem of the weak bond and allows the titanium reinforcing material to utilize its high strength. These characteristics make it both a structurally and economically effective choice over CFRP and other alternatives.
Based on the current research, a titanium retrofit was deployed on a bridge over I-84. In the strengthening design, the number of supplemental reinforcement elements per girder line was reduced from twelve for CFRP to four for titanium. The retrofit was approximately 30% less costly and is expected to have better structural performance than CFRP.

The characteristics of titanium reinforcement, particularly its ability to be bent, open up possible cost savings for a wide range of strengthening situations. Three areas listed in the Research Objectives have been identified for further research to exploit the advantages of titanium reinforcement for strengthening.
 
OBJECTIVE:
The research has three objectives to expand the use of titanium reinforcement:
• Develop a splicing method that allows supplemental reinforcing bars to be deployed along the full length of girders including through the intermediate diaphragms that protrude from most beams.
• Develop an unbonded strengthening detail that eliminates the need to cut grooves into the concrete surface, thereby reducing labor costs, epoxy material costs, and construction time. 3
• Develop methods to apply exterior titanium bars to strengthen girders with inadequate transverse reinforcement.
 
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 776

  Quantifying Noise Impacts from ODOT Aggregate Source Operations 
 Project Coordinator:
 Matthew Mabey
 Research Agency:
 
 Principal Investigator:
 
 Start Date for ODOT:
 
 Completion Date for ODOT:
 
 
Overview:
The potential listing of the sage grouse as “endangered” by US Fish and Wildlife (expected in 2015) has the potential for significant impact to ODOT aggregate source operations.  Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W) has issued a whitepaper in 2012 that provides interim guidance for mitigation for sage grouse habitat from activities associated with industrial-commercial developments.  Such developments include rock quarries.  The interim guidance provides requirements for decibel thresholds, use of propagation models with output binned in 5-decibel contours, and recommended mitigation.  It is unknown if activities from ODOT aggregate source sites comply with these very low noise thresholds. This uncertainty has potential impacts to development and delivery of projects in Regions 4 and 5 that depend heavily on material from ODOT quarries.  Data are needed to determine compliance with the decibel thresholds and identify potential mitigation.   There is also a great need to collect data for development of a methodology that can be applied throughout the state for determining noise impacts to sage grouse habitat and habitat for other noise sensitive species as well as other noise sensitive uses from rock quarries.
 
Objectives: 
The key objective of this project is to establish how noise produced by ODOT aggregate source operations compares to standards being put forward to protect sage grouse populations.
 
Quantifying Noise Impacts from ODOT Aggregate Source Operations Work Plan
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
 
 FY 15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 777

Chip Seal Design and Specifications
 
Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
Research Agency:
 Iowa State University
Principal Investigator:
 Chris Williams/Douglas Gransberg
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 18, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
 July 31, 2016
 
 OVERVIEW:
The RFP defines the problem as a need to “revisit” ODOT’s chip seal design methodology and specifications using common chip seal design methodologies found elsewhere in the US and internationally as a benchmark to identify potential approaches to improve the ODOT chip seal program. The crux of the issue revolves around the upcoming loss of experienced maintenance personnel and the fact that the current ODOT “The technique used to apply chip seals is currently referred to as more of an ‘art’ than ‘science’ and is based on “an experienced person conducting a visual inspection during the application and making adjustments in binder and/or aggregate (chip) rate.” Therefore, ODOT requires a rational chip seal design methodology based on quantitative measurements that can be successfully replicated by contractors in the field and which does not demand the current amount of professional judgment to be successful.
 
 
OBJECTIVE:
Per the RFP, “the objective of this research is to document methods and report the performance of chip seals designed using different methodologies. Once quantified, the research will identify best practices that can be implemented.”
 
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 778

Safety Effectiveness of Pedestrian Crossing Enhancements
Project Coordinator:
 Lyn Cornell
Research Agency:
 Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
 Chris Monsere
Start Date for ODOT:
 September 18, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
 
OVERVIEW:
ODOT’s Tech Services Branch is implementing a pedestrian safety countermeasure program which will direct HSIP funding toward pedestrian safety counter measures (approximately $4 million has been set aside for both pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements). Data-driven safety decision-making–including implementation of the Highway Safety Manual–requires the development of crash modification factors (CMFs) for various roadway improvements. Over the last decade, the Oregon DOT has systematically implemented many pedestrian crossing enhancements (PCEs) across the state. The most commonly deployed treatments include continental crosswalk markings, pedestrian median islands, curb bulb outs, pedestrian activated flashing beacons and advanced stop bars. The existing literature on driver yielding clearly indicates that medians are a significant pedestrian safety feature and pedestrian-hybrid beacons improve driver stopping compliance (both of these are included in the FHWA countermeasures clearinghouse and have CMFs). Rectangular Rapid Flash Beacons (RRFB) also improve driver stopping compliance but the safety effects (CMFs) have not yet been quantified.
Still, many questions remain regarding the quantification of the positive impact of PCEs on overall crashes (i.e. medians may also reduce vehicle crashes) and the transferability of national results. As driver behavior and culture vary, estimates of safety effects (CMFs) are more accurate and relevant when developed from or calibrated by a robust, local data set. In Oregon, installations of crosswalks on state highways at mid-block or uncontrolled intersections require the approval of the State Traffic-Roadway Engineer (STRE). Because of this approval procedure, there is already a comprehensive list of pedestrian crossing enhancements for the state highway system.  A careful integration of the well-documented installations of PCEs across the state with relevant traffic, roadway features, and land use data provides a unique opportunity to conduct  research to estimate safety effectiveness of PCE  designs in Oregon for improved data-driven decisions.
 
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this research is to estimate the effectiveness of PCEs on multimodal safety in Oregon design contexts to derive CMFs calibrated to Oregon (i.e. not only pedestrian crashes but also motorized vehicles and bicycle crashes in the vicinity). This research will carefully consider the type of enhancement, the geometry, the surrounding land uses, and pedestrian/vehicle exposures. The results of this research will provide decision-makers with a valuable tool to guide future PCE deployments. The results of this research can also set the foundation for future cost/benefit analysis of PCEs.
 
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
 
FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 779

Risk Factors for Pedestrian and Bicycle Crashes
 
Project Coordinator:
 Mark Joerger
Research Agency:
 Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
 Chris Monsere/Haizhong Wang
Start Date for ODOT:
 November 4, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
 August 31, 2016
 
 
 
OVERVIEW:
In Oregon, pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities comprise more than 15% of all traffic deaths and are of primary concern for many communities in Oregon (there were 56 bicycle and 247 pedestrian fatalities in the last five years). Oregon has identified pedestrian and bicycle crashes as a primary focus area for investing infrastructure funding and has marked approximately $4 million in the All Roads Safety Program to help address this key need. However, developing a plan for targeted investments is challenging because pedestrian and bicycle crashes are uncommon enough to make it difficult to predict where they will occur next. This random nature also makes it difficult to identify high crash locations and corridors.  As preliminary work towards this problem, ODOT TRS hired a consultant in Spring 2013 to prepare a plan to reduce bicycle and pedestrian crashes by focusing limited resources on locations that have the greatest potential for crash reductions.  The objectives of the plan were to match key effective safety systemic infrastructure countermeasures with potential locations for improvements by identifying a few key patterns of behavior and roadway conditions that cause the high risk locations. The results of the plan were presented and discussed with stakeholders from around Oregon.  The identification of risk factors and the magnitude of their influence on the likelihood of future crashes were significantly constrained by limited roadway information used in the analysis such as bicyclist and pedestrian volumes, the presence of a crossing treatment, presence of a turn lane, driveway activity, and sight distances.  To improve ODOT’s ability to target limited resources more certainty is needed about the most important risk factors.
 
 
OBJECTIVES:
The objective of this work is to develop a tool for ODOT to improve methods to identify and prioritize locations with increased risk, rather than a simple crash history, so they can be proactively treated. Using the consultant’s work as a starting point, this research would continue to investigate the factors related to the common causes of pedestrian and bicycle crashes.  This research will seek to identify key risk factors that contribute to higher than average numbers of serious or fatal pedestrian and bicycle crashes to generate best practices in pedestrian and bicycle problem identification and prioritization, and identify data elements that support decision making and prioritization.
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
 
FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 780

Strategies to Increase the Service Life of Existing Bridge Decks
Project Coordinator:
 Norris Shippen
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Burkan Isgor/Jason Ideker/David Trejo
Start Date for ODOT:
 June 18, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2016
 
Overview:
The potential listing of the sage grouse as “endangered” by US Fish and Wildlife (expected in 2015) has the potential for significant impact to ODOT aggregate source operations.  Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W) has issued a whitepaper in 2012 that provides interim guidance for mitigation for sage grouse habitat from activities associated with industrial-commercial developments.  Such developments include rock quarries.  The interim guidance provides requirements for decibel thresholds, use of propagation models with output binned in 5-decibel contours, and recommended mitigation.  It is unknown if activities from ODOT aggregate source sites comply with these very low noise thresholds. This uncertainty has potential impacts to development and delivery of projects in Regions 4 and 5 that depend heavily on material from ODOT quarries.  Data are needed to determine compliance with the decibel thresholds and identify potential mitigation.   There is also a great need to collect data for development of a methodology that can be applied throughout the state for determining noise impacts to sage grouse habitat and habitat for other noise sensitive species as well as other noise sensitive uses from rock quarries.
 
Objective:
The key objective of this project is to establish how noise produced by ODOT aggregate source operations compares to standards being put forward to protect sage grouse populations.
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
FY 15
FY 16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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SPR 781

Improving Adaptive / Responsive Signal Control Performance: Implications of Non-Invasive Detection and Legacy Timing Practices 
Project Coordinator:
Jon Lazarus
Research Agency:
Northern Arizona University
Principal Investigator:
Edward J. Smaglik
Start Date for ODOT:
September 10, 2014
Completion Date for ODOT:
June 10, 2016
 
Overview:
While much research has focused on the proper placement and setup for non-invasive detection, most of this work has focused on vehicle presence, not vehicle counts.  Given that advanced traffic signal control systems rely on both of these outputs to run their algorithms, knowledge regarding proper configuration of these units for presence and count detection is necessary and generally not available in the literature.  A literature search found one document regarding the configuration of a puck system for counting, though none was located for other methods.  Furthermore, nothing is available that attempts to connect alternative detection strategies with timing plans for advanced traffic signal control systems. 
The industry appears to have realized that this is a pressing issue and there are several active funded projects to address some aspects of the problem, though no projects are taking a quantitative approach to developing vehicle detection guidelines, as is proposed in this work.
 
Objectives:
This research will develop a realistic installation guideline that supports the requirements of advance traffic signal controller operations, hybrid detection installations, and non-invasive detection optimization.  This guideline shall provide prototypical detection configurations and new timing standards with the goal of reducing or eliminating performance degradation. These guidelines will include a cost analysis that appropriately considers equipment and installation costs as well as the cost of increase delay to the motoring public due to the degradation of signal performance. The costs of this delay can be as much as ($18 per delay hour per/day per passenger vehicle) and as much as ($70 per delay hour per/day per interstate transit vehicle). 
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORTS:
 
FY 15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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