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Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

Nail Technology

Nail technician  
Following are answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ) regarding the nail technology field of practice.
 
FAQs on the other three fields of practice and general licensing, regulatory and health, safety and infection control topics… If you have questions that aren't answered here, please contact OHLA at 503-378-8667 or ohla.info@state.or.us.

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Cosmetology Laws & Rules

Following, are Board of Cosmetology laws and rules upon which these frequently asked questions are based.
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OHLA Regulatory Requirements

OHLA professions  
Following are laws and rules related to overarching administrative, procedural, licensing and regulatory compliance requirements for all OHLA-regulated professions.
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Nail Painting

Q:  Is a license required for applying paintings to nail by use of nail printer?  This procedure does not include any type of nail preparation, filing, cleaning, etc.  The user inserts the individual's hands after selecting a picture or symbol and an inkjet printer applies the painting.
 
A:  Yes.  Under OAR 817-005-0005, Definitions:
 
44) "Nail Technology" has the definition set forth in ORS 690.005, which includes the following:
 
(a) The application and removal of artificial nails;
 
(b) The application of mini-art work, etching or imprinting on nails.

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Station/Table Requirements

Q:  Are all items on the nail technology table / station required to be removed prior to cleaning and disinfection?
 
A:  No.  There is no requirement to remove all the items from the table.  However, under OAR
817-010-0065, Requirements and Standards:
 
(1) All tools and implements that come in direct contact with a client, shall be disinfected or disposed of after use.

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Wax "Double Dipping"

Q:  What is wax "double dipping," and is it allowed in Oregon?
 
A:  "Double dipping" implies re-dipping a client's hand or foot or a utensil into the wax bath, which is prohibited under OAR 817-010-0055, Materials in Contact with a Client:
 
(1) All chemical substances, including paraffin wax...shall be dispensed from containers in a manner to prevent contamination of the unused portion.
 
(2) Paraffin wax must be used in such a manner that prevents contamination of wax remaining in the paraffin bath or container, such as application with a single use or sanitized spatula or applicator, or disposal of any used wax. Paraffin must be covered when not in use, and maintained at a temperature specified by the manufacturer's instructions.
 
"Dipping" the hand or fingers in the wax bath is permitted, but the wax left on the hand/fingers cannot be placed back in the bath and must be disposed of.  Just to be sure there is no opportunity for cross contamination, the client's hands or feet should be washed beforehand and there should be no open sores on the client's hand/fingers or foot.
 
Re-Dipping Tools Also Prohibited
Tools or utensils placed into the wax bath and used to spread wax on a client's skin may not be re-dipped into the wax bath unless cleaned and disinfected under OAR 817-010-0040, Articles in Contact with a Client
 
(2) All items which come in direct contact with the client's skin that do not require disinfecting shall be clean.
 
(3) All articles which come in direct contact with the client's skin that cannot be cleaned or disinfected shall be disposed of in a covered waste receptacle immediately after use.
 
Another related requirement is OAR 817-010-0065, Requirements and Standards:
 
(1) All tools and implements that come in direct contact with a client, shall be disinfected or disposed of after use.
 
Practitioners are advised to follow the manufacturer’s guidelines for product use and follow careful disinfection procedures.
 
The bacterial risk issue was investigated by the Board of Cosmetology in 1996.  Tests revealed a very low potential for infection from dipping, primarily due to the heat of the paraffin wax and the almost-immediate covering of the skin by the wax, thus protecting the rest of the wax in the bath from contact with the skin. 
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