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About Us

Mission & Vision Statements

The Oregon State Marine Board's mission is:

"Serving Oregon's recreational boating public through education, enforcement, access, and environmental stewardship for a safe and enjoyable experience.

It's the vision of the Marine Board to create:

"A collaborative community providing opportunities for all boaters to safely and respectfully experience Oregon's waterways."  

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About the Marine Board

Oregon's world-famous white water rivers, pristine lakes and spectacular Pacific coastline make water recreation very popular- there are roughly 180,000 registered motor and sailboats in Oregon and an estimated 500,000 canoes, rafts, kayaks and drift boats. The state's diverse waters also attract boaters living outside Oregon and play a major role in the tourism industry. 
  
The Marine Board is dedicated to making the state's waterways safe and enjoyable for a wide range of users. The Marine Board is dedicated to improving recreational boating throughout Oregon and serves boaters through facility improvements, law enforcement training and services, boating safety education and registration. 
  
The Marine Board is funded by registration fees and marine fuel taxes paid by boaters. No general fund tax dollars are used to support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees go back to boaters in the form of  law enforcement services, education/outreach materials and boating access facilities. 
  
Oregon's Legislature established the agency in 1959 (Oregon Revised Statute 830.105). The Marine Board also: 
  • titles and registers recreational vessels, currently numbering nearly 200,000.
  • establishes statewide boating regulations, trains and contracts with county sheriffs and the State Police for marine law enforcement and safety.
  • promotes safe boating by publishing information brochures, providing boating-education courses, and sponsoring water-safety programs for youth.
  • provides grants to develop and maintain accessible boating facilities and to protect water quality.
  • co-sponsors the Oregon Adopt-A-River program.
  • registers guides and outfitters and licenses charter boats.
  • implements various sustainable boating programs: Clean Marina, Clean Boater, and the Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit program.
Annual Performance Measures​  
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The Board

The governing board consists of five members, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the senate.  The Board guides the Director of the Agency in setting state boating policy and has the authority to enact rules for boat operation. 
  
Members serve four-year terms and can serve a maximum of two consecutive terms.

The Board Members are:

​​​Member Name ​City ​Term
​Brian Carroll - Chair ​Albany ​6/30/17
​Jen Tonneson - Vice Chair ​Portland ​6/30/15
​Jean Quinsey ​Lake Oswego ​6/30/15
​Val Early ​Brookings ​6/30/16
​Clifford Jett ​Rufus ​6/30/17
 
The board meets quarterly, or as needed.  Meetings are open to the public and are announced on our News Releases page and on our Public Meetings​ page.

Learn more about the Marine Board Members and why they serve.
 
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Our Programs

Facilities Program
The Marine Board is committed to helping provide boaters with safe, sufficient, and quality boating facilities.  Most boaters launch at a public boat ramp and will likely need to use boarding floats, a transient tie-up, a parking space, a restroom, a pumpout, or other amenities every time they go boating.  While the Marine Board does not own or operate any of these facilities, we provide funding to the public agencies that do. Find out more... 

Law Enforcement Program
Safety on the water is a high priority for boaters and for the Marine Board, Oregon's recreational boating agency. One way to promote safety is by enforcing boating regulations. Under the Marine Board’s direction, state and county agencies work together to create a safe, enjoyable environment for all boaters. Find out more... 

Education Program 
Safety on the water is a high priority for boaters and for the Marine Board, Oregon's recreational boating agency. One way to promote safety is by enforcing boating regulations. Under the Marine Board’s direction, state and county agencies work together to create a safe, enjoyable environment for all boaters. Find out more... 

Boat Titling & Registration
All motorized boats, regardless of length or type, must be registered in Oregon. Sailboats 12 feet or longer must also be registered. Registration and title fees and marine fuel taxes support boating facilities, marine law enforcement and boating safety education. Find out more... 

Aquatic Invasive Species Program
The Aquatic Invasive Species Program works to protect Oregon waterways from the devastating introduction of zebra or quagga mussels. Several aquatic invasive species (AIS), such as Eurasian watermilfoil, New Zealand mud snails and others, are already present in Oregon, damaging waterways and costing waterway and fishery managers – and ultimately taxpayers, boaters and anglers – millions.  Find out more...  

Clean Boating Program
A boat operator carries a lot of responsibility when navigating Oregon's waterways. These links will help keep Oregon's waters clean. More... 

Clean Marina Program
The Oregon Clean Marina program works to protect and improve local water quality by promoting the usage of environmentally sensitive practices at marinas. The program provides the opportunity for marinas, boatyards, yacht clubs, and floating home moorage to receive recognition for helping to establish and promote a cleaner marine environment for Oregon. More...​ 

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Marine Board Funding

Each year states receive an apportionment of federal funds based on a formula determined by law. States are required to use 15 percent of their total apportionment on recreational boating access projects, which the Marine Board abides by.  To learn more about federal dollars that help support the Marine Board's mission, read Keeping Boating Sustainable, Boaters Pay, Boaters Benefit (Great Lakes Boating Magazine, redistributed with permission). 






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