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    OVMEB
    The Veterinary Medical Examining Board was established in 1903 to test, license, monitor and regulate practitioners of veterinary medicine in the state. The Board's mission is to protect animal health and welfare, public health, and consumers of veterinary services. The Board's authority comes from the Veterinary Practice Act, Chapter 686 of the Oregon Revised Statutes and Chapter 875 of the Oregon Administrative Rules.
Important Information Current Topics

PETS AND POT: FAQ 


Recreational marijuana use will soon be legal in Oregon.  In other states where marijuana has been legalized, veterinarians have seen significant increases in marijuana toxicity in animal patients.   Here's what you need to know about pets and pot.

Q:  Can eating marijuana products or inhaling marijuana smoke hurt my pet?

A:   Marijuana affects animals' nervous systems differently.  Dogs and cats that ingest marijuana products may experience toxicity symptoms and, though rare, even death.  Dogs especially are attracted to edible marijuana  products, such as baked goods and butter.  Second-hand smoke inhalation, though less hazardous, may also result in toxicity.

Q:   What are the symptoms of marijuana toxicity?

A:   Animals may appear listless or disoriented, become hyperactive, or exhibit panting, urinary incontinence or vomiting. Extreme exposure can lead to stupor and lowered body temperature.

Q:   How soon would an animal show signs of marijuana toxicity?

A:   Clinical signs become apparent anywhere from five minutes to 96 hours, and last from five minutes up to three days.

Q:   Is marijuana toxicity treatable?

A:   Yes.  A veterinarian will choose the right treatment option depending on the amount and type of marijuana ingested, time since ingestion or exposure, and symptoms reported and exhibited.   With timely veterinary care, symptom discomfort can be relieved, and prognosis for recovery is excellent.

Q:   Can my veterinarian write a prescription for pet marijuana?

A:   No.  Marijuana is not approved for veterinary use.

IF YOUR PET HAS BEEN EXPOSED TO MARIJUANA AND EXHIBITS TOXICITY SYMPTOMS, CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN.

Information is provided courtesy of Oregon veterinarians. 


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Protect yourself, your family and your co-workers by staying informed. The Governor of Oregon has asked that this site be posted to all state agency web sites. It is always a good idea to check with your doctor on your health care, especially at this time of year.
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