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Sessions
 
 

Morning Sessions

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 Noon

A

Afternoon Sessions

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

B

1

Youth and the U.S. Justice System:
Our Histories - Our Future (Part 1)

Youth and the U.S. Justice System:
Our Histories - Our Future (Part 2)

2

Reducing Racial Disparities
Across Child Serving Systems

Addressing Racial
Disproportionality & Disparity in
Washington State Child Welfare

3

Dual Jurisdiction
Dependency & Delinquency Cases

Mental Health,
Dependency & Delinquency

4

Understanding the Impacts of
Racial Profiling:
Training for Oregon Law Enforcement

Student Threat Assessment:
A Comprehensive System for
Threat Assessment and
Management in the Schools

5

Indian Child Welfare Act

Working Effectively with
Tribal Governments

6

CeaseFire Chicago:
Theory, Critical Elements and Results

Implementing the OJJDP DMC
Reduction Model and Using the
Reduction Best Practices Database

7

Racial Disproportionality, Racial Disparities, Evidence Based Management and Practice Based Evidence and African Americans

Salem-Keizer
Parent Leadership Training

8

Building Successful Alternatives to Secure Confinement

Police, Probation and Detention:
A Case Study in
Community Partnership and Collaboration
9

Consequences of Structural Racism and What to Do About It in
Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Service Systems

Why Racial Disproportionality is the Single Most Important Problem in the U.S. Child Welfare System and How Can Evidence Based Practice Help?

Youth attendees may register for any of the general sessions listed above, but are encouraged to attend the following sessions designed specifically for youth.

10

Youth Session

YAR
Youth and Adolescent Relationships

Youth Session

African American
Youth Leadership Development:
Principles and Strategies

Madgesdiq
(Antoine Stoudamire)

Spoken Word, Poetry

Youth Resource Fair

See below for session details.

 

 

Morning Sessions

A - 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon

► A-1 -- Youth and the U.S. Justice System:  Our Histories - Our Future (Part 1 of 2; second part during afternoon session)

Presenter:
Malachi Garza, Technical Assistance and Peer Exchange Manager at the W. Haywood Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice Fairness and Equity (CA)

Description:  Youth & the U.S. Justice System is a popular education history curriculum that traces developments in the juvenile justice system from the 1500ís to the policies and practices of today. This curriculum documents changes in the treatment of youth, particularly the impact of class, gender, race and ethnicity on the incarceration of youth in the U.S.

The curriculum utilizes images, accessible language and critical thinking questions to engage participants. This session will focus on content as well as training methodology of this curriculum.


► A-2 -- Reducing Racial Disparities Across Child Serving Systems

Presenters:
Brad Richardson, Ph.D., National DMC Coordinator

Representative Wayne Ford (IA)

Description:  Research and practice change involving demonstration projects to reduce disparities in the child welfare system and simultaneous efforts to reduce disparities in the juvenile justice system have been conducted over the past five-year period. County, family, individual and administrative data have been used to evaluate outcomes. While there are many cases of disparities in the child welfare, juvenile justice and educational systems, the Minority Youth and Families Initiative (MYFI) and DMC efforts to eliminate disparities show that measurable results can be achieved through a combination of systems change and changes in direct practice. The findings provide guidance for reducing disproportionality and measuring systems change and program improvement.


► A-3 -- Dual Jurisdiction:  Dependency & Delinquency Cases

Presenters:
Denise C. Herz, Ph.D., Professor
California State University - Los Angeles

Shalinee Hunter, Corrections Consultant

Description:  Until recently, research on child welfare and juvenile justice populations rarely identified youth who were involved in both systems. This presentation will review more recent research that examines the characteristics of dual jurisdiction youth and their outcomes. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role race/ethnicity and gender play in defining crossover youth as well as their experiences in the system. Data from various efforts in California will be used to examine these issues.


► A-4  -- Understanding the Impacts of Racial Profiling:  Training for Oregon Law Enforcement

Presenters:
Henry Reimann

Frank Thompson, Superintendent, Santiam Correctional Institution

Description:  The Simon Wiesenthal Objectives on Racial Profiling Objectives Course is a program that includes an interactive virtual learning experience segment.  It compels trainees to make critical choices in testing situations.  Unique to this program is the ability to see the outcome of the user's choices and evaluate their consequences.  This training tool moves officers into a new paradigm of thought on the subject of racial profiling.  It is sensitive to the challenges that face Law Enforcement both in reality and in the management of public perception.  The product is founded on a robust ethical perspective projected into real life situational choices.  The objective of this training is to allow Law Enforcement Officers to confront a number of complex issues that surround the debate on racial profiling.


► A-5  -- Indian Child Welfare Act

Presenter:
Terry L. Cross, MSW, ACSW, LCSW (Seneca Nation of Indians)

Description: 


► A-6  -- CeaseFire Chicago:  Theory, Critical Elements and Results

Presenter:
Amanda Geppert, Director of National Partnership and Technical Assistance for CeaseFire Chicago

Description:  The CeaseFire model employs a public health approach to prevent and reduce shootings and killings among high-risk and gang-involved youth and to change the community norms associated with the spread of violence.  In this workshop, the theory and the critical elements that guide CeaseFire program implementation will be described as well as the results from the recent U.S. Department of Justice evaluation.  Ample time will be provided for questions from participants.


► A-7 -- Racial Disproportionality, Racial Disparities, Evidence Based Management and Practice Based Evidence and African Americans

Presenters:

Dr. Harold Briggs, Ph.D., Professor in the School of Social Work at Portland State University

Dr. Bowen McBeath, Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at Portland State University

Description:  Drs. Briggs and McBeath depict the structural contingencies that mask racial disproportionality and disparities, and how evidence based management (EBM) and practice based evidence (PBE) approaches aid in establishing a community transformation which embodies a culture of learning and problem solving for child welfare and juvenile justice providers working with racially diverse, marginalized and distress youth, families, and communities.


► A-8  -- Building Successful Alternatives to Secure Confinement

Panel Participants:

Honorable Nan G. Waller, Presiding Family Law Judge, Multnomah County Circuit Court

Tina Edge, Multnomah County Juvenile Services Division, Shelter Service Program Coordinator

Patty Iwamoto, Multnomah County juvenile Services Division, Detention Intake and Placement Specialist

Les Taylor, Multnomah County Juvenile Services Division, Gang Resource & Intervention Team Supervisor

Cynthia and Phillip Johnson, owners and Operators for New Decisions

Description:  This workshop will consist of experts in the field of community-based supervision programs including, design, funding, implementation and using data to measure program effectiveness.  The goals of this continuum of community-based programs are to reduce recidivism, reduce failure to appear rates and to improve public safety.


► A-9  -- Consequences of Structural Racism and What to Do About It in Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Service Systems

Presenters:
Dr. Joy DeGruy, nationally and internationally renowned researcher, educator, author, and presenter

Description:  This session is presented by Dr. Joy DeGruy.  She lays out the historical and present day expressions of trauma and injury of African American youth and the importance of respect as a protective factor against pursuing an anti-social personality.

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Afternoon Sessions

B - 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

► B-1 -- Youth and the U.S. Justice System:  Our Histories - Our Future (Part 2 of 2; first part during morning session)

Presenter:
Malachi Garza, Technical Assistance and Peer Exchange Manager at the W. Haywood Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice Fairness and Equity (CA)

Description:  Youth & the U.S. Justice System: Is a popular education history curriculum that traces developments in the juvenile justice system from the 1500ís to the policies and practices of today. This curriculum documents changes in the treatment of youth, particularly the impact of class, gender, race and ethnicity on the incarceration of youth in the U.S.

The curriculum utilizes images, accessible language and critical thinking questions to engage participants. This session will focus on content as well as training methodology of this curriculum.


► B-2 -- Addressing Racial Disproportionality & Disparity in Washington State Child Welfare

Presenters:

Honorable Patricia Clark, King County Superior Court

Lyman Legters, Senior Director, Casey Family Programs

Description:  Washington State has recently passed legislation requiring the analysis of racial disproportionality and disparities in its public child welfare system, and a plan for remediation of the disproportionality/disparities. This workshop will describe how a local grass roots collaboration elevated the issue of racial disproportionality and disparities, developed an analysis, built a foundation of understanding of institutional and structural racism, tried a number of practice innovations, and ultimately was the catalyst for the legislation and state-wide focus on this most important and relevant issue.


► B-3 -- Mental Health, Dependency & Delinquency

Presenter:

Denise C. Herz, Ph.D., Professor
California State University - Los Angeles

Description:  Research increasingly documents high levels of mental health and substance abuse problems among juvenile offenders; however, this research has not looked at the prevalence of mental health and substance abuse problems among youth who are involved in both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems. This presentation uses data collected from Los Angeles County, California to examine the prevalence of these problems among a sample of dual jurisdiction youth and to explore the relationship between these problems and other characteristics such as the provision of treatment, placement instability, and recidivism.


► B-4 -- Student Threat Assessment:  A Comprehensive System for Threat Assessment and Management in the Schools

Presenters:

John VanDreal, School Psychologist
Salem-Keizer School District

Lt. Dave Okada, Salem Police Department

Description:  This session will review the collaborative, multi-agency structure of the Mid-Valley Student Threat Assessment Team, located in Salem, Oregon.  The system operates within a community that has centralized education resources, risk management resources, public mental health and a strong presence of law enforcement.  However, the model offered can also be adapted in a more generic version to address the needs of rural communities with limited resources or resources contracted through providers located in larger urban centers.

The team assesses threats of violence in our youth population, examining both aggravating and mitigating circumstances, then works with the family, educational system, social networks, criminal justice and community to develop intervention strategies to keep the violence from occurring.  These strategies are often effective at not only keeping the youth from committing the acts of violence, but also examines long-term management plans.

Specifically, the presenters will provide a brief survey of the research that addresses youth violence, an overview of a successful multi-disciplinary threat assessment and management system and a pertinent case study.


► B-5 -- Working Effectively with Tribal Governments

Presenters:
Laura Ansera, Tribal Programs Coordinator, OJJDP

Patrick Dunckhorst, Program Manager, Demonstration Programs Division, OJJDP

Description:  To provide state and local governments with education about tribal sovereignty, which will include cultural sensitivity training, important in assisting tribal governments in their efforts to better identify DMC status of tribal youth services.


► B-6 -- Implementing the OJJDP DMC Reduction Model and Using the Best Practices Database

Presenters:

Andrea Coleman, State Representative
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Washington D.C.

Marcia Cohen, Vice President
Development Services Group, Inc., Bethesda, Maryland

Description:  This workshop will provide a brief overview of OJJDP's DMC Reduction Model and provide effective strategies to address the five phases (Identification, Assessment/Diagnosis, Intervention, Evaluation/Performance Measurement, and Monitoring).  This includes implementing and sustaining state and local initiatives, ensuring activities, findings, and information in each phase are based on data obtained in the previous one, and how to conduct ongoing evaluation and monitoring.  How to use the OJJDP DMC-Reduction Best Practices Database to find appropriate strategies at each contact point will also be demonstrated.


► B-7 -- Salem-Keizer Parent Leadership Training

Presenter:

Eduardo Angulo, Salem-Keizer Coalition for Equality (OR)

Description:  This workshop series is an informational resource prepared to assist individuals who are involved in the education of Latino and migrant parents. The curriculum is aimed to support parents with their participation in the education of their children.

Through an unusual combination of parent participation and leadership in the development and assessment, the curriculum presented here (Educate and Inspire: The Oregon Statewide Parent Leadership Training Series) is being developed with the input of hundreds of Latino immigrant and migrant parents. The resulting workshop series is therefore a tool that is by parents and for parents; the true leaders of this project.


► B-8 -- Police, Probation and Detention:  A Case Study in Community Partnership and Collaboration

Panel Participants:

Honorable Nan G. Waller, Presiding Family Law Judge, Multnomah County Circuit Court

Tina Edge, JDAI Project Consultant
Multnomah Department of Community Justice

Thomas Cleary, Senior Deputy District Attorney
Juvenile Division, Multnomah County

David Virtue, Sergeant, Training Division
Portland Police Bureau

Description:  Law enforcement is a crucial stakeholder in juvenile justice.  Multnomah County Department of Community Justice and the Portland Police Bureau recently joined hands to develop and implement alternative responses to youth involved in certain kinds of offenses.  New police officers now receive intensified training on the juvenile justice system, including placement in community services organizations that expose them to the types of complex issues that they face when dealing with juveniles in the field.  The resulting collaboration, known as the Community Partnership Program, has deepened law enforcement's understanding of, and input into, detention reform and juvenile justice practice.


► B-9 -- Why Racial Disproportionality is the Single Most Important Problem in the U.S. Child Welfare System and How Can Evidence Based Practice Help?

Presenters:

Dr. Julia Littell, Professor, Bryn Mawr College
Graduate School of Social Work

Dr. Jennifer Bellamy

Description:  This session begins with Dr. Julia Littell providing conference participants with the evidence supporting the claims of devastation created as a result of racial disproportionality in child welfare.  It is concluded by Dr. Jennifer Bellamy describing the role of EBP as a useful approach for addressing racial disproportionalities using the BEST Project as an illustration.


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Youth attendees may register for any of the general sessions listed above, but are encouraged to attend the following sessions designed specifically for youth.

10:30 a.m. -12:00 Noon

► A-10

► YAR, or Youth and Adolescent Relationships

Presenter:
Terri Gregory

Description:  YAR, or Youth and Adolescent Relationships, is a curriculum designed to help students move toward positive cooperation and success.  The basic premise stems from a general knowledge and understanding of Erikson's 8 Life Stages, focusing primarily on the Adolescent stage and all of its impingements.  Cultural, familial and personal expectations are addressed.


► Madgesdiq - Spoken Word, Poetry

Presenter:
Madgesdiq (Antoine Stoudamire)

Description:  "To spread peace, love and freedom through the power of words and music," perfectly describe the mission of the artist know as Madgesdiq.  This one-time basketball prodigy, who received a full ride scholarship and attended Georgetown University before transferring to and then graduating from the University of Oregon has since crossed over (no pun intended), and now uses the vastness of his life experiences and passion for writing to inspire and entertain others.


 

1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

► B-10

► Youth Session

African American Youth Leadership Development:
Tools and Strategies

Presenter:
Greg Evans, Professor of Ethnic Studies, Lane Community College
Director of African American Student Programs, and
President and CEO of the Greg Evans Group Education Consultants

Description:  Leadership is both art and science.  Leadership requires vision, mission, and values to develop a sound philosophy and workable approach to leading people of any race, creed, color, or gender.  In the African American community, however, a unique set of principles and strategies has emerged over the 400-year experience of slaves and former slaves from the African continent in western civilization.  In this workshop we will apply these principles and strategies for emerging young African American leaders.

This workshop is designed to be an interactive experience for African American youth.  This presentation will provide African American youth  with a set of usable tools to begin building their leadership skill sets.  The concepts and principles presented will empower African American youth to create their own unique leadership style for application in their community and school.


Youth Resource Fair


 

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