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PRISM
Overview
 
PRISM At A Glance  (ppt, 291 KB) -- This self-paced slide show presents an overview of the purpose, data sources, and benefits of PRISM.
 
Fast Facts (pdf, 41 KB) -- A one-page report including recent trends.
 
Performance Indicators (pdf, 22 KB) -- A description of PRISM's four performance indiciators.
 
Episode (ppt, 217 KB) -- An episode is the basic building block in PRISM. An episode is the period between the first service date and the date of service completion, determined by the partner agency.
 
Episode Count Report (pdf, 25 KB) -- The number of new intake records transmitted to PRISM each quarter by each of the workforce partners.

 
Commonly Asked Questions
Legislation and Agencies
 
Q. What is PRISM?
A. PRISM is an acronym for Performance Reporting Information System. PRISM was established for the purpose of collecting, analyzing and sharing statistical and demographic data for the development and reporting of the workforce system performance measures.
 
Q. Under what statute and administrative rule does PRISM operate?
A. PRISM was established during the 2001 Oregon Legislative Assembly, by the introduction and passage of Senate Bill 400. Two years later, Senate Bill 250 was introduced and passed modifying the original Bill to accept private organizations to participate in PRISM.
 
Oregon Revised Statute -- 657.734
Oregon Administrative Rule -- 471-015-0005
 
Q. Who administers the system?
A. The system is administered by the Director of the Employment Department in consultation
with the Governor’s Education and Workforce Policy Advisor. A Steering Committee, composed of representatives from the participating agencies, provide system oversight and direction in areas of policy, funding, and strategic direction.
 
Q. What agencies participate?
A. Three agencies, representing six programs currently participate in PRISM. The three agencies include Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development, Department of Human Services, and the Employment Department.
 
Q. Can any agency or organization participate in PRISM?
A. Yes, statute allows for any public or private agency or organization to participate in PRISM.
 
Q. Is there a cost to participate?
A. There is a cost to participate in PRISM. The cost varies depending upon the number of records the agency/organization submits to PRISM. Participating agencies also share in the cost of the infrastructure.

Performance Indicators
 
Q. What performance measures are tracked and reported?
A. PRISM publishes reports quarterly for three employment related measures. The measures are Employment (percentage of individuals being employed after receiving services), Retention (percentage of individuals working four continuous quarters), and Wage Gain (the increase in average hourly wage after one year). A caseload management report displaying the number of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cases is also published each quarter.
 
Q. Who determined what performance measures would be tracked and reported?
A. During the early planning phase of PRISM, representatives from each participating agency met to identify, define, and recommend the current performance measures to the PRISM Steering Committee. The Steering Committee approved the measures.
 
Q. What are the definitions of the performance indicators?
A. Employment, retention, and wage gain measures are calculated using UI (Unemployment Insurance) wage records. Each quarter Oregon employers (approximately 95 percent), by law, are required to submit to the Employment Department the amount of wages paid and number of hours worked for each employee. 
 
Employment – Percent of participants who were employed after receiving services.
The selection criteria for the employment report include two subsets.
1)  Participant completed services and had a goal of employment after completing services, and 2)  Participant had wages during the quarter of completing services or the quarter after completing services.
 
Retention – Percent of participants who have been employed in four continuous quarters after completing services. The selection criteria for the placement report include two subsets.
1)  Participants who completed services and got a job within six months of completing services,
and 2) Participants who remained employed for four continuous quarters.
 
Wage gain – Average hourly wages for those employed in the fifth quarter less their average hourly wages in either the quarter of completing services or the quarter after completing services. The selection criteria for the placement report include two subsets.
1)  Participants who completed services and got a job within six months of completing services,
and 2) Participants who had at least one hour of work during the quarter of completing services or the quarter after completing services, and one year later.
 

Source Data
 
Q. What data are collected?
A. Participating agencies submit data to PRISM on their customers. The data includes social security number, customer demographics, the county where the customer applied for services, the date the customer applied for services or was found eligible for services, the type of services provided, dates the services were provided, duration of the services, and the date the agency considered the customer to have completed all the services. The completion date tells PRISM to begin tracking employment outcomes for the customer.
 
The other source of data used in PRISM is the UI (Unemployment Insurance) wage data. Each quarter Oregon employers are required to submit to the Employment Department the amount of wages paid and number of hours worked for each employee. PRISM uses these data to report the percentage of individuals employed after receiving services (Employment), whether the individual worked four continuous quarters (Retention), and the average hourly wage increase after one year of work (Wage Gain). PRISM also includes wage data from other states. Out-of-state wage data are supplied by the states through the Wage Record Interchange System (WRIS). This clearinghouse for wage data allows states to track employment history of individuals who received services from Oregon's workforce system and subsequently left the state. 

Q. Why are agencies required to send social security numbers of the customers to PRISM?
A. The social security number is used to match against the UI (Unemployment Insurance) wage records. The social security number is the only method by which employment information can be tracked for individuals.
 
Q. Do agencies send records to PRISM on all individuals?
August 4, 1993, the Attorney’s General office released an opinion addressing the issue of allowing agencies to send all customer records to the system with the individuals consent. The opinion paved the way for the current policy. The Attorney’s General opinion prohibits participating agencies from using their customer’s social security number when providing data to the system, unless the agencies have provided notice to their clients describing:
 
(1) under what authority it is collecting the SSN;
(2) whether that collection is mandatory or voluntary; and
(3) what uses will be made of the SSN.
 
Prior to January 1, 2006 participating agencies were required to give the customer the ability to “opt in” or “opt out” of giving their consent for their information to be collected or disclosed. Data submitted to PRISM prior to January 1, 2006 included only those records where the customer decided to "opt in" and disclose their information to PRISM.
 
Q. Are the data in PRISM confidential?
Yes, the data are confidential. The information in PRISM is not a public record and the custodian of the information is the agency that submits the data. PRISM acts as a limited agent on behalf of the partner. PRISM staff are permitted to produce reports containing only aggregate data consisting of no fewer than three unit records. Commitment to Confidentiality (pdf, 192 KB)
 
Q. Do participating agencies get access to their own data in PRISM?
Yes, agencies have access to their own data in PRISM. Selected staff, within each agency, are allowed access to their data through a secured connection to the database.
 
 

Wage Data
 
Q. Do all employers submit wage information on their employees to the Employment Dept.?  How long after the end of the quarter are employers required to submit wage information to the Employment Dept.? What validation, if any, is conducted on the wage data supplied by the employer on employee wages?

A. Answers to these questions and more about wage data from employers
 
Q. What is the minimum wage in Oregon?
A.  Effective January 1, 2014, the Oregon minimum wage is $9.10 per hour. ORS 653.025.
 
For calendar year 2004 and beyond, Measure 25 requires the Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor and Industries to calculate an annual adjustment to the minimum wage. The annual adjustment is to be calculated each September for the following calendar year and is based on any increase during the previous 12 months in the U.S. City Average Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers for All Items.
 
Under the new law, the minimum wage is to be rounded to the nearest five cents and to take effect on January 1 of the year following each adjustment.
 
Q. What is the federal minimum wage?
A. The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour.
 
Q. How much has the minimum wage increased in recent years?

A. A recent minimum wage history:


 
 Federal
State
09/01/97
$5.15
01/01/97
$5.50
-----
-----
01/01/98
$6.00
-----
-----
01/01/99
$6.50
-----
-----
01/01/03
$6.90
-----
-----
01/01/04
$7.05
-----
-----
01/01/05
$7.25
-----
-----
01/01/06
$7.50
-----
-----
 01/01/07 
 $7.80 
07/24/07
$5.85
-----
----- 
-----
-----
01/01/08 
$7.95
07/24/08
$6.55
-----
-----
-----
-----
01/01/09
$8.40
07/24/09
$7.25
 ----- 
 ----- 
-----
-----
01/01/11
$8.50
-----
-----
01/01/12
$8.80
-----​
-----​
01/01/13​
$8.95​
-----​ -----​ 01/01/14​ $9.10​
​-----​ ​-----​ ​01/01/15 $9.25​
 Source: Bureau of Labor and Industries
 
 

Reports - Types and Frequency
 
Q. What reports are produced regularly by PRISM?
A. Standard reports include Employment, Retention, Wage Gain, and TANF Caseload Management.
 
Q. How often are the standard reports published?
A. Reports are published quarterly and are posted on the PRISM web site the second week of the month following the end of the quarter.
 
Q. What information is included on the standard reports?
A. Employment, retention and wage gain reports contain employment outcome information for each workforce region and participating agency. Demographic information including gender, disability, age, ethnicity, and education is displayed. Industry information is also included on each report. The TANF report includes the number of cases by region for the current month and the previous five months.
 
Q. Are the data on the reports unduplicated?
A. The data on the reports are not unduplicated. An individual may receive services from two or more agencies during the same period of time.
 
Q. Is the regional information displayed on the reports based on the county of residence or where the county of application for services?
A. Along with each data submission to PRISM, agencies submit a county code which reflects the county where the individual first applied for services. Therefore, the regional information on the standard reports reflect outcomes for the region where the customer first applied for services regardless of  where additional services were rendered or where the customer resides.
 
Q. Does PRISM have occupational information?
A. No. Unemployment Insurance wage data, used by PRISM to track employment outcomes, does not contain occupational information.
 
Q. What is the service completion date located on the top right hand side of each standard report?
A. The services completion date represents the date in which the individual(s) completed his/her services from the agency. A services completion date of January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004 represents the time period where all individuals that were previously receiving services, completed the set of services by the agency. The agency considered the individual ready for employment.
 
Q. Can one individual be included twice in a report?
A. Yes, it is possible for an individual to be included twice in a report. If an customer is served by two agencies and completes services from both agencies approximately during the same time period, the person would be counted twice on the report.
 

Customer Service
 
Q. Who do I contact if I have a question or want more information?
A. Contact information is listed on the Contact Us page.

 
Attorney General Opinion
This 1993 opinion addresses federal and state confidentiality requirements that may affect the proposed operation of a Shared Information System (SIS), the precursor system to PRISM, by a group of state workforce development agencies, and the use of social security numbers in the system.
 
Attorney General’s Opinion, Dept. of Justice, August 4, 1993, No. 8226 (pdf, 224 KB)

 
Informed Consent
In March 2005, staff from the Oregon Employment Department asked the Oregon Department of Justice for clarifications and explanations of key principles relating to the federal Privacy Act of 1974, the use of social security numbers, and the need for an individual’s informed consent before using their social security number. The following principles represent the final result of these efforts.
 
1. Section 7 of the Privacy Act applies only in situations where a federal, state, or local government agency is requesting the SSN from an individual.
 
2. The Privacy Act specifically defines the components of informed consent. If a government agency collects the SSN from the individual, it must tell the individual:
 
(1) under what authority it is collecting the SSN;
(2) whether that collection is mandatory or voluntary; and
(3) what uses will be made of the SSN.
 
3. A "yes/no" check box is not required by the Privacy Act and is not necessary if the uses that will be made of the SSN are authorized under federal or state statute.

 
Source Data
There are three main data sources in PRISM. One source comes from partner agency records which includes customer demographics and workforce development service type, location, and dates.
 
The second source comes from the Unemployment Insurance (UI) files provided quarterly by employers and includes wage and industry information on the workforce. PRISM matches partner agency customers with UI files to produce employment outcomes and the performance measures.
 
The third source includes wage records from other states. Out-of-state wage data are supplied by the states through the Wage Record Interchange System (WRIS). This clearinghouse for wage data allows PRISM to track employment history of individuals who have participated in Oregon's workforce system and subsequently left the state.

 
WRIS and WRIS2

 

WRIS

During July 2009, out-of-state employment data were added to the PRISM employment and retention reports. The out-of-state employment data help PRISM track performance outcomes of individuals who received services from Oregon’s workforce development system and subsequently left the state. The data are supplied by the states through the Wage Record Interchange System (WRIS). Reports produced with a service completed date on or after July 1, 2005 include WRIS data. Use of the data for performance is limited to by agreement for individuals served by Title 1B and the Employment Department. WRIS data are not included in the wage gain report since the out-of-state data does not include the number of hours worked – data required for calculating average hourly wage. 
 
more about the Wage Record Interchange System (WRIS)

WRIS Data Sharing Agreement


WRIS2
 

During November 2012, reports produced with a service completed data on or after October 1, 2009 include limited out-of-state wage data. These data are limited to by agreement for individuals served by Community College, Title II Adult Basic Education, TANF / JOBS, and the Vocational Rehabilitation. Out-of-state wage data are supplied by the states through the Wage Record Interchange System 2 (WRIS2). This clearinghouse for wage data allows states to track employment history of individuals who have participated in state workforce investment programs and subsequently left the state.

more about Wage Record Interchange System 2 (WRIS2)

WRIS2 Data Sharing Agreement

 
Performance Measures
Every quarter PRISM produces employment performance reports on customers served by the PRISM partner agencies. The performance measures are: 
 
Employment - Percent of participants employed after receiving services.
 
Retention - Percent of participants employed in four continuous quarters after completing services.
 
Wage Gain - Fifth quarter average hourly wage minus first quarter average hourly wage.
 
Caseload Management - Number of current TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) cases by workforce region.
 

 
Workforce Regions
Oregon's 15 workforce regions. 
 
Workforce region map (pdf, 53 KB)
 
Participating Agencies
Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development  www.oregon.gov/CCWD/
  • Title 1B – Youth, Adults, and Dislocated Workers
  • Title II – Adult Basic Education
  • Postsecondary Career Technical Education (Community College)
 
Employment Department  www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/  
  • Wagner-Peyser
 
Department of Human Services  www.oregon.gov/DHS/
  • Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF - JOBS clients)
  • Vocational Rehabilitation

 
Governance
Education and Workforce Policy Advisor and Director of Employment Department
The Director of the Employment Department administers and, in consultation with the Education and Workforce Policy Advisor, oversees the development of PRISM.

Steering Committee
The Steering Committee is composed of representatives from each participating organization. They meet on an as-needed basis. The committee has the following responsibilities:
  • Provide system oversight and direction in areas of policy, funding, and strategic direction;
  • Provide strategic focus and advocacy;
  • Provide executive leadership for represented partners;
  • Determine requests for changes to cost or scope of the system; and
  • Provide issue resolution.

 
Steering Committee members:

Agnes Balassa

Graham Slater

David Ritacco 

Xochitl Exparza

Jordana Barclay 

Elizabeth Cox Brand
  
 
Minutes from previous Steering Committee meetings: 
  
May 8, 2013 (pdf, 9,676 KB)                                                                                                     March 13, 2013 (pdf, 1,200 KB)                                                                                              January 16, 2013 (pdf, 219 KB)                                                                                                   July 8, 2005 (pdf, 57 KB)
November 23, 2004 (pdf, 33 KB)
August 31, 2004 (pdf, 25 KB)
November 25, 2003 (pdf, 33 KB)
February 25, 2003 (pdf, 61 KB)
October 22, 2002 (pdf, 25 KB)
May 28, 2002 (pdf, 33 KB)
December 18, 2001 (pdf, 50 KB)
October 23, 2001 (pdf, 37 KB)
September 25, 2001 (pdf, KB)
August 21, 2001 (pdf, 18 KB)
February 26, 2001 (pdf, 37 KB)

Data Elements Committee
The Data Elements Committee is composed of representatives from each of the participating agencies. The committee meets on an as-needed basis and focuses on the development and processing of PRISM data. It may also make data-related policy recommendations to the Steering Committee. The committee has the following responsibilities:

  • Develops a data collection system that will provide uniform access to all agencies;
  • Maintains current and reliable submission of data to the system;
  • Periodically reviews and analyzes existing data elements ensuring that only necessary data items are collected and sorted; and
  • Reviews and analyzes new data elements.
 
Minutes from Data Elements Committee meetings:
 
June 9, 2005 - Agenda (pdf, 13 KB)
June 9, 2005 - Minutes (pdf, 84 KB)
March 20, 2003 - Agenda (pdf, 9 KB)
March 20, 2003 - Minutes (pdf, 12 KB)
Februrary 19, 2003 - Agenda  (pdf, 66 KB)
February 19, 2003 - Minutes  (pdf, 9 KB)
 

PRISM and Common Measures
Staff from the PRISM partner agencies consider the Common Measures for PRISM.
 
Summary of the January 18, 2007 meeting  (pdf, 36KB)
 
Summary of the February 6, 2007 meeting  (pdf, 38KB)
 
Summary of the current status of the PRISM / Common Measures Work Group's discussions  (pdf, 29KB)
 
Summary of the April 3, 2007 meeting  (pdf, 26KB)

 
Charter
Development of a performance accountability system authorized by Senate Bill 400 (SB 400), directed the Employment Department to “establish a system for collecting, analyzing and sharing data for development of workforce system performance measures”. The charter includes project overview, workgroups, key benefits, scope, deliverables, and cost for the development of PRISM 1.0.
 
Executive Summary (pdf, 24 KB)   
 
PRISM Charter (pdf, 135 KB)  

 
Legislation
capitol

Senate Bill 400, effective in 2002, established PRISM as a data collection and performance reporting system. This lead to the creation of Senate Bill 250 in 2003.
 
Oregon Revised Statute 657.734 – Performance Reporting Information System  (pdf, 58 KB) 
 
Oregon Administrative Rule

 
Workforce Dev. System
The workforce development system, in its widest application, is the web of programs and providers, both public and private, that prepares workers and job seekers with the information and skills needed to find or maintain employment, and assists employers to employ skilled workers or to increase the skills of their workforce. In this inclusive view, the workforce development system has three parts: education, economic development, and workforce development. However, when we refer to the workforce development system we usually mean the public workforce development system. Furthermore, we often narrow the view even farther by defining the system as the federally-funded workforce system. In that narrower view, there are four state agencies directly responsible for the implementation of the major programs involved in the workforce development system in Oregon. The agencies, and the programs they operate, are:
 
Oregon Employment Department (OED)
     • Wagner-Peyser*
     • Labor Market Information (LMI)
     • Trade Adjustment Act (TAA)
     • Unemployment Insurance (UI)
 
Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development (CCWD)
    • WIA Title IB*
    • WIA Title II – Adult and Family Literacy*
    • Carl Perkins Post-Secondary*
 
Department of Human Resources (DHS)
    • Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF)*
    • Food Stamp Employment and Training
    • Vocational Rehabilitation*
    • Older Americans Act Title V – Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP)
 
Oregon Department of Education
    • Carl Perkins Secondary/Postsecondary
 
The Governor’s Office of Education and Workforce Policy (OEWP) leads the development of the workforce system in Oregon. This office develops education and workforce policy and implements the Governor’s vision for education and workforce development.
 
Other state agencies are involved in the management of allied workforce programs, such as:
  • Commission for the Blind,
  • Department of Corrections,
  • Department of Housing and Community Services,
  • The Department of Education (K-12),
  • The Oregon University System (OUS), and
  • The Oregon Economic and Community Development Department (OECDD).

 
* Submit data to PRISM.

 

 A Message from Governor John A. Kitzhaber

 



 
Quantifying PRISM

This graph shows the cumulative totals by each partner agency since July 2000. 
  
Cumulative growth by agency (pdf, 10 KB)
 
The number of new records transmitted to PRISM each quarter. 
  
Total record count  (pdf, 50 KB)
 
Many customers are served by the workforce system receive services from more than one agency. The workforce agencies partner to provide training and employment services to assist individuals to find and keep jobs. These matrices show the percentage of the customers from one partner agency that are also served by another agency. 
  
Service matrix PY 2001 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2002 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2003 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2004 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2005 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2006 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2007 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2008 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2009 (pdf, 39 KB) 
Service matrix PY 2010 (pdf, 45 KB)                                                                                     Service matrix PY 2011 (pdf, 45 KB)
  
     
Service matrix five years - July 2005 through June 2010 (pdf, 38 KB)
 
Oregon's workforce development system is the web of programs and providers, both public and private, that prepares workers and job seekers with the information and skills needed to find or maintain employment. PRISM receives data from six programs representing three agencies. These six programs provide a set of  services which complement each other to help people find and keep jobs. Click a button to view the number and percent of services provided to those who found a job by quarter. The file contains macros and it's recommended to save the file to a hard drive.
  
Number and Percent of Services by Region or Agency (xls, 1,330 KB)
 
Individuals served by Oregon's workforce system can, and often do, receive services by more than one agency. The longer the time period of reporting, the greater the chance an individual is served by two or more agencies. Published quarerly PRISM employment reports are not unduplicated data. This report displays the actual employment rate as reported on the PRISM quarterly reports and the unduplicated employment rate when an individual is counted only once. 
  
Unduplicated employment rate  (pdf, 30 KB)

 
Key Events in History
 
Key events in the history of the development of Oregon's Workforce Reporting System.
 

1989 Workforce 2000 Legislation recognizes the need for an official occupational information system.
1989 Oregon Automated Follow-up (OAF) predates the Shared Information System (SIS).
1989 Legislative Fiscal Office develops comprehensive state job training policy.
1990 Legislative Fiscal Office (LFO) advocates consolidating job training administration, establishing a state data collection policy, and providing program evaluation and review.
1991 Workforce Quality Council established with policy making oversight over SIS.
1992 Application Transfer study identified data management and reporting issues in a multi-agency environment. Finding provided foundation for SIS design.
1993 SIS enacted into law and commissioned as Oregon's central data system for workforce development. (Senate Bill 81)
1993 Attorney General releases an opinion regarding state and federal confidentiality requirements that may affect the proposed operation of  Oregon's workforce reporting system.
1995 SIS and OAF merge into an integrated system.
1995 SIS database structure complete.
1999 Interagency Agreement signed establishing data sharing, transmittal, and reporting responsibilities between SIS and 10 participating agencies.
2002 Senate Bill 400 passed the 71st Legislature in the 2001 regular session, effective January 01, 2002. The bill allows an enhanced design to replace SIS. The new reporting system is called the Performance Reporting Information System (PRISM).
2002 First PRISM reports are published from the system beginning with July 2000 data.
2003 Senate Bill 250 passed during the 72nd Legislative session. The bill allows for private organizations to participate in PRISM.
2005 SIS quarterly reports are published for the last time.
2005 The Attorney's General office releases a clarification to the requirement for informed consent. Agencies are no longer required to provide an "opt-in" or "opt-out" option to their customers for informed consent. The OAR is changed to exclude the "opt-in" or "opt-out" option. The OAR becomes affective January 1, 2006.
2006 Ethnic data are added to the PRISM reports.
2009 Reports produced with a service completed date on or after July 1, 2005 include out-of-state wage data. These data are limited to by agreement for individuals served by Title 1B and the Employment Department. Out-of-state wage data are supplied by the states through the Wage Record Interchange System (WRIS). This clearinghouse for wage data allows states to track employment history of individuals who have participated in state workforce investment programs and subsequently left the state.
2009 After 14 years of operation SIS data is deleted, August 2009. PRISM, a more flexible, improved version of SIS has been in operation for seven years.

2011

Senate Bill 109 is introduced to the 75th Legislature during the 2011 regular session. The bill repeals the Shared Information System statute. The Governor signed the bill May 16, 2011. The bill becomes effective January 1, 2012, and will officially put an end to the Shared Information System (SIS).

2011

November 2011, placement reports include a total unduplicated count.

2012​

November 2012, reports produced with a service completed data on or after October 1, 2009 include limited out-of-state wage data. These data are limited to by agreement for individuals served by Community College, Title II Adult Basic Education, Children, Adults, and Families - TANF, and the Vocational Rehabilitation. Out-of-state wage data are supplied by the states through the Wage Record Interchange System 2 (WRIS2). This clearinghouse for wage data allows states to track employment history of individuals who have participated in state workforce investment programs and subsequently left the state.​

2013​ February 2013, veterans outcomes added to the PRISM reports.​
2013​ May 2013, Placement rate is changed to Employment rate.​
2013​ August 2013, Five Year Wage Gain reports published.​