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OAA Frequently Asked Questions

Questions

Public

  1. I received a notice about a debt I owe. How do I pay this?
  2. Why do agencies send their debt to the Department of Revenue / OAA for collection?
  3. Who do I call with questions about my debt?
  4. I’ve received a Notice of Proposed Adjustment and/or Distribution and disagree with the refund distribution. How do I request my share of the refund?
  5. How do I dispute the debt claimed by an agency?

Agencies

  1. How do I begin sending liabilities to OAA for collection?
  2. What is a program code?
  3. How do I report payments on my agency's liabilities?
  4. When does my agency get confirmation of payments you have received on my liabilities?
  5. How long does OAA keep liabilities that I assign to them for collections?
  6. Who is responsible for OAA’s collection fee?
  7. After receiving a Notice of Proposed Adjustment and/or Distribution, how can a debtor dispute the refund distribution?
  8. What are apportionments?
  9. Collection Account Assignment forms sent via paper or FAX take 2–4 weeks to show up on OAA's system. Why does it take so long?
  10. If liabilities are sent in electronically, does OAA maintain any paperwork on the debt, or is the collection data all maintained on the computer, including memos, payments, etc.?
  11. Is there a way to access current balance and payment information without waiting for the monthly payment report or calling OAA?
  12. How does the debtor dispute debts assigned by an agency?
  13. Liabilities are sometimes sent back by OAA after only 1–2 months labeled “uncollectible no assets, or cannot locate.” Why not keep them for an entire year?

Have any questions or comments about what you find here?
Please contact OAA.

Answers

Public

  1. I received a notice about a debt I owe. How do I pay this?

    Please visit our How to Pay Your Account page for payment information.

  2. Why do agencies send their debt to the Department of Revenue / OAA for collection?

    With the passage of ORS 293.250, the 1971 legislative session made Other Agency Accounts the state’s collection unit. Legislation sets parameters and requirements for state agencies to collect and have their debt collected. Chapter 35 of the Oregon Accounting Manual also sets guidelines and provides information on how agencies can facilitate this process.
  3. Who do I call with questions about my debt?

    Contact our main line at 503-945-8199 or toll-free at 877-222-2346.
  4. I’ve received a Notice of Proposed Adjustment and/or Distribution and disagree with the refund distribution. How do I request my share of the refund?

    If you are not responsible for the debt(s) listed in the notice because they belong to your spouse, you may ask OAA to divide the refund. OAA divides Oregon income tax refunds based on each spouse's share of the total adjusted gross income. If a spouse had no income, they are not entitled to have the refund divided. If the spouse had income other than wages, a schedule should be provided showing each spouse's income. Either partner on a jointly filed return can request the refund to be divided.
  5. How do I dispute the debt claimed by an agency?

    You must send your dispute in writing. After OAA receives the written dispute, collection action is suspended on the specified liability(s), and a notification form is sent to the corresponding agency. The agency will research the liability and make a determination, such as one or more of the following: adjust the liability; cancel and return; amount is correct; or continue collections. The agency must complete the form and return a signed and dated copy to OAA within 30 days. After receiving the returned form, OAA will follow the prescribed instructions.

    OAA is bound by Oregon statutes (ORS) and rules (OAR), as well as policies and procedures set out in the Oregon Accounting Manual (OAM). OAM 35.30.30 and 35.40.30 give specific information about OAA's requirements regarding collections. Depending on the criteria, the liquidated status of a liability may change with a debtor's dispute. Although the time specified by an agency to dispute a billing has expired, this does not necessarily extinguish the debtor's right to object. If the debtor thereafter disputes the debt, in certain circumstances, the debt will no longer be considered liquidated.

 

Agencies

  1. How do I begin sending liabilities to OAA for collection?

    Before we can receive liabilities from your agency, we require specific information to set up a program for you in our system. You can contact OAA for more information.

  2. What is a program code?

    When you assign debt to OAA for collections, we give you a program code based on the type of debt and the type of collection services that will be performed.

    You may need more than one program code for your debt type(s). We will match our collection services to fit your needs, such as:
    • Full collection services
    • Warrant and garnishment services
    •  Refund offsets only

    Do you need to deactivate a program code? Your business may have changed and you no longer need a program code. Please contact us if this occurs.
     
    Would you like to reactivate an existing program code? Deactivated program codes can be reactivated and will require a new service agreement. Therefore, it is important that you contact us for information on the fees and for a new service agreement.


  3. How do I report payments on my agency's liabilities?

    There is an Adjustment Memo form to fill out. We also accept telephone calls. Please contact us if you want to send payment records in data transfer format.

  4. When does my agency get confirmation of payments you have received on my liabilities?

    OAA distributes monthly reports electronically at the beginning of each month. These reports will reflect the transactions from the previous month.

  5. How long does OAA keep liabilities that I assign to them for collections?

    When you assign your liquidated and delinquent liabilities to OAA, as provided in ORS 293.231, the law requires OAA to return a liability to the assigning agency after six months of no payments. OAA has obtained exemption approval from Department of Administrative Services (DAS) State Controllers Division (SCD), which allows us to actively collect on liabilities until 365 days without a payment. State Courts have specific statutory authority that allows OAA to keep a liability for collections for one year. A debtor may have several different liabilities. Any payment or refund offset, that posts to one of these liabilities will reset the period back to one year. Liabilities assigned to OAA for the refund offset only program are not subject to this period.

  6. Who is responsible For OAA’s collection fee?

    Our collection fees are deducted from the gross amount of any payment collected, and the remainder (net amount) is disbursed to the assigning agency. By statute, OAA does not add collection fees to the debt or charge a fee to the debtor. An agency should always credit the gross amount collected to a debtor’s liability. If an agency does not credit the gross amount collected to the debtor, OAA’s accounting will be out of balance. OAA’s legislative authority for a collection fee is Oregon Revised Statute (ORS) 293.250. Variations to our collection fees are stated in each agency’s service agreement with OAA.

    Agencies can only pass our collection fee on to the debtor if they have the legal authority to do so. Please reference your agency’s legislative authority or legal counsel for adding the collection fee to any debt you send to OAA.

  7. After receiving a Notice of Proposed Adjustment and/or Distribution, how can a debtor dispute the refund distribution?

    If the debtor is not responsible for the debts listed in the notice because they belong to the spouse, they may ask DOR to divide the refund through an apportionment request. Income tax refunds are based on each spouse's share of the total adjusted gross income.

  8. What are apportionments?

    When a couple files jointly and one of the partners has an outstanding liability, any refund will offset to the debt. The partner without the debt is the “injured spouse.” Requesting an apportionment is how the “injured spouse” can receive their portion of a tax refund. Either partner can file a request. The refund is apportioned based on the adjusted gross income of each person.

    How does this affect your agency? If a request for an apportionment is processed, OAA will reverse money we have previously collected for your agency.

    If you have requested notification of a potential reversal, you will be sent an email. If you would like to be added to the notification list, please contact us.

    For more information, see numbers 8, 9, 10, 11, and 13 of the refund section of our Assistance and Common Questions page.

  9. Collection Account Assignment forms sent via paper or FAX take 2–4 weeks to show up on OAA's system. Why does it take so long?

    This method of receiving liabilities  requires more processing. The forms are sent to a processing unit to key the data. The data is uploaded and rejected items are corrected, then the liabilities are loaded to our computer system and a demand letter is mailed to the debtor.

  10. If liabilities are sent in electronically, does OAA maintain any paperwork on the debt, or is the collection data all maintained on the computer, including memos, payments, etc.?

    All liability information is stored electronically.

  11. Is there a way to access current balance and payment information without waiting for the monthly payment report or calling OAA?

    For liabilities under the full collection program, you can call the OAA main line and any agent will provide the current balance. On liabilities under the refund offset only program, email your request to: oaa.accounttech3@dor.state.or.us. You may also request current balances on liabilities under the full collection program at this email address.

  12. How does the debtor dispute debts assigned by an agency?

    The debtor must send their dispute in writing. After OAA receives the written dispute, collection action is suspended on the specified liability(ies), and a notification form is sent to the corresponding agency. The agency will research the liability and make a determination, such as one or more of the following: adjust the liability; cancel and return; amount is correct; or continue collections. The agency must complete the form and return a signed and dated copy to OAA within 30 days of receipt. After receiving the returned form, OAA will follow the prescribed instructions.

    OAA is bound by Oregon statutes (ORS) and rules (OAR), as well as policies and procedures set out in the Oregon Accounting Manual (OAM). OAM 35.30.30 and 35.40.30 give specific information about OAA's requirements regarding collections. Depending on the criteria, the liquidated status of a liability may change with a debtor's dispute. Although the time specified by an agency to dispute a billing has expired, this does not necessarily extinguish the debtor's right to object. If the debtor thereafter disputes the debt, in certain circumstances, the debt will no longer be considered liquidated.


  13. Liabilities are sometimes sent back by OAA after only 1–2 months labeled “uncollectible no assets, or cannot locate.” Why not keep them for an entire year?

    Generally, liabilities are kept for one year. If it’s determined that a debt is uncollectable and the debtor has multiple liabilities at various aging stages, including one at a year, all liabilities may be returned for that debtor.