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Workshop offers training on removal-fill permits
05/17/2011
 
More information: Julie Curtis, 503-986-5298; julie.curtis@state.or.us (Salem)
                            Sarah Kelly, 541-388-6060; sarah.kelly@state.or.us (Bend)                          
 
                                                                                                                                    11-18
 
 
Simplified process, new rules the focus of technical education
 
Hood River – The Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) will hold a workshop to explain new rules recently adopted for processing removal-fill permits. The in-depth training will cover all aspects of the removal-fill program, and is designed for wetland consultants, watershed coordinators and other permit applicants.
 
The meeting will be held:
 
Thursday, May 26
9:00 a.m. to Noon
Hood River County Admin Building
First Floor Conference Room
601 State St.
Hood River
 

The primary purpose of the new rules, effective March 1, is to make it simpler to get removal-fill permits for low-impact projects. Restoring wetlands, stabilizing stream banks, placing pilings, and transportation maintenance all now qualify for a series of "notice-based" general authorizations. The goal is to facilitate these types of activities, not require a complicated permit application process, said Sarah Kelly, DSL's permit coordinator for counties in north-central and northeast Oregon.
 
Oregon law requires any person who plans to remove or fill material within waters of the state, including wetlands, to obtain a permit from the Department of State Lands. Certain exemptions apply, and the threshold for a permit is 50 cubic yards of material except in Essential Salmon Habitat waterways.
 
More information is available on the DSL Web site: www.oregonstatelands.us.
 
The State Land Board consists of Governor John Kitzhaber, Secretary of State Kate Brown and State Treasurer Ted Wheeler. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.
 
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