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Oregon Diploma - Credit for Proficiency

In 2002, the State Board of Education approved the policy "Districts may award credit based on proficiency" sometimes referred to as “Credit for Proficiency.” This provides students the opportunity to earn graduation credits within Oregon’s standards-based system by demonstrating what they know and can do. Students may demonstrate proficiency through classroom work or documentation of learning experiences outside of school, or through a combination of these means. Policies to award credit for proficiency are created and implemented by local school districts in accordance with OAR 581-022-1131.

Credit for Proficiency Guidance

The guidance documents linked below are provided to assist school districts in development and implementation of local Credit for 
  • In April, 2009, the State Board of Education adopted a revised version of the Credit Options OAR (581-022-1131) following the recommendations of the Credit for Proficiency Task Force. This rule requires districts to identify in local policy which options are available to their students.
  • Credit for Proficiency Guidelines (2009): These guidelines are designed to assist school districts in development and implementation of local Credit for Proficiency policies and procedures.
  • Program Brief on Credit for Proficiency
  • Applied Academic Credit: As the new Oregon diploma requirements are being phased in, many districts are considering alternatives to the traditional academic course work in math, science, and language arts. This document provides guidance on how to award credit that is consistent with all current Oregon and federal rules.
  • District Policy Questions: This resource is provided for districts in developing local policy documents.
  • District Process Guidelines: This resource is provided for districts in developing local processes to award credit for proficiency.
  • Oregon Student Accounting Manual for the 2011-2012 School Year

Teaching and Learning to Proficiency


Teaching and Learning to Proficiency in Oregon has been fueled by a grassroots movement to increase student ownership of their own learning and to increase student achievement to standards. An ever-increasing number of Oregon school districts, schools, and classrooms have implemented strategies that require students to demonstrate they know and can apply the knowledge and skills included in the Oregon academic content standards. The resources available here are offered to provide support to those seeking more information about Proficiency teaching and learning and to offer examples from Oregon school districts and classrooms.

Theory and Best Practice Resources 

While specific to grading, the discussion also points to the value of reporting of the students' proficiency to academic content standards. Webinar: Standards-Based Grading and Assessing Student Mastery of Content, May 30, 2013. Northeast College and Career Readiness Research Alliance hosted presentations by Dr. Thomas Guskey and Dr. Robert Marzano. 

Parent Communications 

Some districts may choose to address the "at least" annual proficiency report by adopting a standards-based grading system. These resources are provided to show how some districts have already implemented a standards-based system. Samples of letters and other communication tools that help parents understand a standards-based grading system.

Report Cards

Examples of standards-based report cards. HB 2220 does not require changes to district report cards. The items included here are intended to show how report cards can be used to report student achievement in terms of the academic content standards, and might eliminate the need for a separate annual proficiency report.

Grading

Examples of grading systems for a variety of grade levels and content areas. While HB 2220 does not require districts to change grading systems, some districts may choose to move to a proficiency-based grading system for clearer communication of student academic achievement. Some of these examples, initially separating academics and behavior, re-combine the academic and behavior grades to compute a final grade.

Systems Implementation

These materials were generated as districts/schools put standards-based grading into practice. These resources are provided for schools and districts choosing to adopt proficiency-based systems. Schools and districts are not required to adopt such systems by HB 2220.

Video Exemplars of Proficiency-Based Teaching and Learning

Two examples of overview videos. One is of Shady Cove Elementary in Eagle Point, which was designated as a Model School. The second showcases the strong Proficiency Education practices at Hidden Valley High School in the Three Rivers School District.
BEC-Proficiency-based Teaching and Learning: This link goes to the Business Education Compact (BEC) website where there are more proficiency teaching and learning resources. The BEC has provided support for the Proficiency initiative since 2003.

Credit for Proficiency Related Links & Resources

Other states across the nation are implementing similar processes as they continue to develop standards based instruction and assessment in their school systems. The links below connect to on-going state-wide efforts in proficiency and competency based instruction. 

Links

Resources

  • Arter, J., Chappuis, J., (2006). Creating & Recognizing Quality Rubrics. Portland, OR: Education Testing Service.
  • Chappuis, S., Stiggins, R.J., Arter, J., & Chappuis, J. (2005). Assessment for Learning: An Action Guide for School Leaders, 2nd ed.
  • O'Connor, Ken. (1999). How to Grade for Learning. Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Training and Publishing.
  • O'Connor, Ken. (2010). A Repair Kit for Grading: 15 Fixes for Broken Grades. Portland, OR: Education Testing Service.
  • Stiggins, R.J., Arter, J., Chappuis, J., & Chappuis, S. (2005). Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing It Right—Using It Well.
  • Handbook on Effective Implementation of School Improvement Grants: Carole L. Perlman and Sam Redding, Editors; Center on Innovation & Improvement (In Chapter 7, see page 149 Implementing Competency-Based Instruction in High Schools)

Other States

Other states across the nation are implementing similar processes as they continue to develop standards based instruction and assessment in their school systems. The links below connect to on-going state-wide efforts in proficiency and competency based instruction.

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