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Data Information and Reporting for Indicator E.c.
Oregon Indicator of Sustainable Forest Management E.c.
Forest plants and animal species at risk
 

Forestry Program for Oregon Strategy E:
Indicator E.c. is one of three indicators that will measure progress towards achieving Forestry Program for Oregon Strategy E: Contribute to the conservation of diverse native plant and animal populations and their habitats in Oregon's forests.
 
Quick Links -
Other Indicators for
Stategy E Reporting
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Desired Trend
Decreasing number of Oregon native forest plant and animal species at risk (extinction, extirpation, endangered, threatened or potentially endangered or threatened).

At-a-Glance: Condition, Trend, and Information

Condition:Trend:Information:
Symbol for Poor Condition
Symbol for Deteriorating Trend
Symbol for Adequate Information
Poor
Deteriorating
Adequate 

Why is this indicator important?
A marbled murrelet swimming in the Pacific Ocean off of the Oregon coastline
A marbled murrelet swimming off of the Oregon coastline
This indicator will provide statewide tabular and map information on the status of plant and animal species recognized as at risk by the NatureServe/Natural Heritage ranking system because of rarity or other factors causing vulnerability to extinction.
 
The State of Oregon and the U.S. Government have both passed Endangered Species Acts (ESA) to prevent species from becoming extinct. Because the federal ESA is one of the strongest environmental laws in the nation, both including new species and removing species from the ESA list has become a complex scientific and political endeavor.  
 
It is important to recognize species may be “at risk” before they become candidates for ESA listing.  This indicator looks at a larger list of native forest plants and animals which are considered to be either “at risk” or potentially at risk in Oregon.  It provides Oregonians with information by which to measure the state’s progress at both preventing new native forest species from becoming at risk of extinction, and of reversing trends showing increases in the number of forest species at risk through time.

What does this indicator tell us about sustainable forest management?
Condition:

 Symbol for Poor Condition
Poor

Out of the estimated 595 vertebrate forest species native to Oregon, a total of 62 mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians are forest species considered to be at risk.  Out of a total of approximately 3,500 native forest plant species in Oregon, there are a total of 180 vascular forest species (flowering plants, ferns, and conifers) which are at risk.
 
 
For each taxonomic group, "Condition" will be considered:
  • "Good" if less than five percent of the known forest species are at risk, and
  • "Poor" if five percent or more of the known forest species are at risk.
 
In aggregate, "Condition" will be considered:
  • "Good" if the condition of all five taxonomic groups, other than invertebrates, is "Good";
  • "Poor" if the condition of two or more of the taxonomic groups, other than invertebrates, is considered "Poor"; and,
  • "Mixed" under all other combinations of taxonomic group conditions.
 
Based on the estimates of the total number of Oregon forest species in each of the six major groups, the following percentages of forest species are currently considered at risk.
  • Vascular Plants (flowering plants, ferns, and conifers) -5.1 percent (180/3500) - Poor
  • Mammals -7.3 percent (11/150) - Poor
  • Birds - 5.6 percent (17/305) - Poor
  • Herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians) -23.4 percent (15/64) - Poor
  • Fish - 25 percent (19/76) - Poor
  • Invertebrates – Unknown total number of species.  Fifty-six species considered at risk.

Trend:

 
Deteriorating
Data used for the initial indicator report encompass updated changes in status ranks from 2001 to 2007. 
 
For each taxonomic group “Trend” will be considered:
“Improving” if there is a net decrease in at-risk rankings since the previous reporting period;
“No Change” if there is no net change in at-risk rankings since the previous reporting period; and, 
“Deteriorating ” if there is a net increase in at-risk rankings since the previous reporting period.
 
Note: A species ranked for the first time will be counted as an increase in at-risk ranking.
 
In aggregate, “Trend” will be considered:
“Improving” if there is a net decerease in at-risk rankings since the previous reporting period for all six taxonomic groups;
“Deteriorating ” if two or more taxonomic groups exhibit a net increase in at-risk rankings since the previous reporting period; and
“Mixed or No Change” under all other combinations of taxonomic group trends.
 
The number of at-risk native species has been generally increasing in Oregon; however, the numbers of at-risk forest mammal, bird, herpetofauna, and fish species are stable or slightly decreasing.  Forest vascular plants and invertebrates have experienced a slight increase in the number of species at risk. The number of at-risk invertebrate species (mainly insects and snails) may be a reflection of new scientific knowledge about these species, rather than an actual increasing trend in species at risk.
 
For plants and mammals, some species were evaluated for the first time (23 plants, two mammals, and seven invertebrates).  Within the six groups, there has been a total of 20 forest species (five plants, three mammals, five birds, two herpetofauna, and five invertebrates) which are now less at risk than in 2001. Conversely, there were 20 species (13 plants, one mammal, three birds, and three invertebrates) that are now considered to be at greater risk.

Information:

 
Adequate
Statewide information is available for this indicator.  The Oregon Biodiversity Information Center of the Oregon State University's Institute for Natural Resources publishes information on rare, threatened, or endangered species in Oregon. The Oregon Biodiversity Information Center integrates status information from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Oregon Department of Agriculture. Biologists working for these agencies, together with the state's herbaria, museums, the U. S. Forest Service, and the Bureau of Land Management provide most of the information that comprise the Oregon Biodiversity Information Center's databases.  The species lists are updated every other year, and long-term trends will be available.

Report: Oregon Forest Vascular Plants at Risk
A pie chart showing the numbers of Oregon Vascular Plants at Risk
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Full-page-sized printable PDF of the above chart.

Report: Oregon Forest Mammals at Risk
A pie chart showing the numbers of Oregon mammals at risk
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Full-page-sized printable PDF of the above chart

Report: Oregon Forest Birds at Risk
A pie chart showing the numbers of forest birds in Oregon at risk
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Full-page-sized printable PDF of the above chart.

Report: Oregon Forest Herpetofauna (Reptiles and Amphibians) at Risk
A pie chart showing the numbers of forest herpetofauna in Oregon at risk
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Full-page-sized printable PDF of the above chart.

Report: Oregon Forest Fish at Risk
A pie chart showing the numbers of fish that inhabit Oregon's forests that are at risk
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Full-page-sized printable PDF of the above chart.

Report: Oregon Forest Invertebrates at Risk
A pie chart showing the numbers of invertebrates that inhabit Oregon's forests that are at risk
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Full-page-sized printable PDF of the above chart.

Report: At-Risk Species as a Percent of Total Number of Species
A chart showing species of need in Oregon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 8.  The relative number of ESA or Oregon Biodiversity Information Center List 1 and List 2 forest species at risk expressed as a percent of the estimated total number of species.  Vascular plants does not include hybrids and exotics.  The total number of invertebrate species is unknown.
 
 
Full-page-sized printable PDF of the above chart.

Evaluation by the Oregon Roundtable on Sustainable Forests on this indicator
 
Evaluation of Indicator E.c.- Forest Plants and Animal Species At Risk [PDF; 6 pages; 230 KB]
 
Staff Response to Indicator E.c. [PDF; 163 KB; 6 pages]

Metrics and Data Sources


Metric
Data Source
Number of forest species in each federal ESA status rankingU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Number of forest species in Oregon Biodiversity Information Center Lists 1 and 2Oregon Biodiversity Information Center
http://orbic.pdx.edu/rte-species.html
Historic and current distribution of forest species Oregon Biodiversity Information Center

Related State, National, or International Indicators
  • Montreal Process: Criterion 1—Conservation of Biological Diversity:  2003 Indicator 7:  The status (threatened, rare, vulnerable, endangered, or extinct) of forest-dependent species at risk of not maintaining viable breeding populations, as determined by legislation or scientific assessment;  2003 Indicator 8: Number of forest-dependent species that occupy a small portion of their former range; 2003 Indicator 9: Population levels of representative species from diverse habitats monitored across their range; and 2010 Indicator 5: Number and status of native forest associated species at risk, as determined by legislation or scientific assessment
  • Northeastern Area: Indicator 4:  Status of forest/woodland communities and species of concern (with focus on forest-associated species)
  • Oregon Benchmarks: Environment--86:  Percent of monitored freshwater species not at risk: (state, fed listing): a.  salmonids; b. other fish; c. other organisms (amphibians, mollusks); 88:  Percent of monitored terrestrial species not at risk: (state, fed listing): a. plants; b. vertebrates; c. invertebrates; 88 (old):  Protected species. Species populations that are protected in dedicated conservation areas: a. species found in streams or rivers; b. other;  89:  Percent of land in Oregon that is a natural habitat
  • HeinzCenter:  At-Risk Native Species.  What are the percentages of forest dwelling species in various levels of risk to extinction?
  • OregonStateof the Environment Report:  Percentage of at-risk species that are protected in dedicated conservation areas
  • Environmental Indicators - Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds:   Number of native plant and animal species and distribution over time (departure from potential) and at-risk species (aquatic, estuarine, and terrestrial; plant and animal)