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Tree Talk Podcasts
Tree Talks are a series of digital podcasts produced by the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Urban and Community Forests program. These Talks were coordinated in 2012 by Heather Reed – a student at Oregon State University and a past Oregon Department of Forestry intern in Urban & Community Forestry.
 
 
Tree Talk #1 – Why to NOT Top Trees
 
 [MP3 8.2 Mb, 9:00 Produced October 2012]
 
5 Reasons to Stop Topping Trees Tree topping is the indiscriminate cutting back of tree branches to stubs. It weakens trees, leaves trees vulnerable to insects and disease, and shortens the life span of trees.
 
A humorous and informative talk about with Cass Turnbull from plantamnesty.org, here are 5 reasons to stop topping trees.
 
Additional Information:
 
 
Music: “Bill Bailey” performed by Inspirational Beets. Music: Hughie Cannon © Kendor Music, Inc. Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC; Universal Music Publishing Group
 
 
 
Tree Talk #2 – Ascending the Giants and Oregon Champion Trees
 
 
[MP3 13.7 Mb, 15:00 Produced November 2012]
 


A talk about tree preservation efforts and the "Treeverse" film with Ascending the Giants and the Oregon Champion Tree Registry.
 
Treeverse: Oregon Public Broadcasting filmmaker John Waller teams up with tall‐tree arborists on an unprecedented “treeverse” through the canopy of Oregon white oaks near Canby. The 5‐day quest tests the ingenuity and grit not only of the climbers but every shooter, rigger, and John himself. Why brave the cold, mud and storms of March in treetops? To find out if it can be done, sure. But also to celebrate the majestic beauty of these rapidly disappearing native groves.
 
Additional Information:
 
 
 
 
Music: “Washington and Lee Swing” performed by Inspirational Beets. Music: Thornton W. Allen and M. W. Sheafe © EMI Music Publishing
 
 
 
Tree Talk #3 – Right Tree, Right Place
 
 
[MP3 5.5 Mb, 6:00 Produced November 2012]
 
Trees are a vital component of a healthy urban community, providing a multitude of benefits that include clean air, clean water and psychological well-being. They also provide economic return.
 
But how to choose the right tree for the site? Think "Right tree, right place."
 
Take some time to think about both the needs of the tree and the site you are planting it in. How big will the tree be 10 or 20 years from now? Make sure the site you choose for your new tree has adequate room for both roots and crown, considering sidewalks, asphalt and overhead power lines. A little planning and foresight in tree and site selection will provide years of benefits from the trees you choose.
 
In this Podcast guest Abbey Driscoll, an Oregon State University graduate student working on her Master's degree in urban forestry, talks to us about matching your tree selection with your site, including factors like rate of growth, sun/shade preference, and water requirements.
 
Additional Information:
 
 
 
Plant Selection Directory of Recommended Links ‐ University of Washington Botanic Gardens Elisabeth C. Miller Library
 
Music: “When You’re Smiling” performed by Inspirational Beets. Music: L. Shay, M. Fisher, J Goodwin © Songwriters Guild of America, EMI Music Publishing
 
 
 
Tree Talk #4 – So you want to plant a fruit tree? 
 
 
[MP3 9.8 Mb, 10:40  Produced November 2012]
 
Guest: Karen Wolfgang, Independence Gardens, LLC
Host: Heather Reed, Oregon State University student and ISA‐certified arborist
 
This talk covers some details that you may want to consider if you’d like to plant a fruit tree. Some of the topics include selection guidelines, planting, fruit tree care, harvest, and more.
 
Definitions:
Percolation test: determines the absorption rate of soil in a potential planting site. It will help
you to ensure your new fruit tree is planted in a location with adequate drainage.
− Dig a hole 1 ½ to 3 feet deep and 6 to 12 inches wide
− Fill the hole with water and allow it to drain
− Then fill the hole again and keep track of how much water drains per hour
− A drainage rate of 1 to 2 inches per hour indicated adequate drainage
 
Microclimates: Variances in elevation, buildings or structures near planting site, aspect, exposure, trees and plants nearby. Cold pockets, patterns in water flow, sunlight, and wind. Soil texture; may send soil samples to a lab for analysis.
 
Spacing: 15‐30 feet depending on the tree species and variety.
Sunlight: 6‐8 hours/day minimum; 8‐10 hours for best growth and fruit production.
 
Additional Resources:
Tree Care through the Year, Oregon Association of Nurseries
 
 
 
Pruning Basics (OSU Extension)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Friends of Trees (Portland, OR)
 
 
 
The Benefits of Trees at arborday.org
 
Music: “Washington and Lee Swing” performed by Inspirational Beets. Music: Thornton W. Allen and M. W. Sheafe © EMI Music Publishing
 
 
 
Tree Talk #5 – Albany's Talking Water Gardens 
 
 
[MP3 5.45 Mb, 6:00  Produced November 2012]
 
 
Albany's "Talking Water Gardens" is a public works project that cools treated wastewater before entering the Willamette River. It does this via elevated walking trails through a wetlands that gives visitors a beautiful view of the natural system at work, including plants and wildlife.
 
Join Oregon State University student and ISA-certified arborist Heather Reed and learn how the City of Albany's "Talking Water Gardens" does the work of a traditional water treatment plant while offering shade, beauty, recreation and bird and wildlife watching.
 


 
Music: “Bill Bailey” performed by Inspirational Beets. Music: Hughie Cannon © Kendor Music, Inc. Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC; Universal Music Publishing Group
 
 
Tree Talk #6 – What Makes Fall Colorful?
   
 
[MP3 3.2 Mb, 3:28  Produced October 2012]
 

 
The leaves of deciduous trees change color each fall due to a combination of environmental factors. During summer months, a leaf is green because the tree is making chlorophyll through the process of photosynthesis. As day length wanes in the fall and temperatures cool, photosynthesis begins to shut down, revealing the natural color pigments of the leaves - what we know as fall colors.
 
Join host Heather Reed, Oregon State University student and ISA-certified arborist, as she explains more about leaf pigment and what makes fall so colorful.
 
This information is from the Fall Plant ID course taught by Renee Harber in the Horticulture program at Clackamas Community College in Oregon City. Permission was kindly granted to use her material. Clackamas Community College has a wide range of courses to learn more about plants and trees!
 
Additional Information:
 
 
Take time out to enjoy fall color or plant a tree ‐ Oregon Department of Forestry
 
Why Tree Leaves Turn Color in Autumn ‐ University of Illinois, Forestry
 
See plants turn fall color before you buy them ‐ Oregon State University Extension
 
 
 
 
Music: “When You’re Smiling” performed by Inspirational Beets. Music: L. Shay, M. Fisher, J Goodwin © Songwriters Guild of America, EMI Music Publishing
 
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This project was funded in part by a grant for the USDA Forest Service. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is an Equal Opportunity employer and provider.
Questions about the project? Contact the ODF Public Affairs Office