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Properties Recently Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Full text nominations for Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the last six months can be found below. If a property is not listed below, please contact Tracy Zeller at (503) 986-0690 or Tracy.Zeller@oregon.gov for an electronic or paper copy. 
 
A complete list of inventoried and National Register-listed properties is available online through the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

Camp White Station Hospital Administration Building, Jackson County, White City
Listed December 20, 2016

The Camp White Station Hospital Administration Building (Building 200) was constructed in 1942 to house hospital administration uses associated with the development of US Army Camp George A. White in White City, Jackson County, in southern Oregon.  White City is an unincorporated community developed on the site of this former US Army training cantonment in the years following the Camp’s decommissioning at the end of World War II.  The building was converted to the administration building for the Camp White Domiciliary in 1949.  Today it still serves an administrative function associated with the 145-acre Department of Veterans Affairs Southern Oregon Rehabilitation Center & Clinics (SORCC) campus.  The two-story, brick-clad, Colonial Revival  building was designed by noted California architect Myron Hunt based on Army Corps of Engineers plans dated November 1941.

--> Download the Camp White Station Hospital Administration Building nomination [pdf]

-->  View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Vale I.O.O.F. Hall, Malheur County, Vale, Listed December 6, 2016
The Vale IOOF Hall was constructed in 1908 and served as a center for community activities in the town of Vale for several decades.  The Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge #100 was founded in 1885 in Glennville, Oregon, and moved (including its meeting hall) to Vale in 1887 when that city became the seat of the newly-formed Malheur County. Like many IOOF organizations across the state, the Vale Lodge served the cultural and social needs of the small town of Vale, playing a significant roll in the civic and social development of the town.  In addition to fulfilling the IOOF’s mission to “Visit the Sick, Relieve the Distressed, Bury the Dead, and Educate the Orphan,” it also served as a dance hall and meeting space for most fraternal organizations in the community, as well as the location of several Vale businesses in its two storefronts on the ground floor.  Designed by regionally prolific architect Herbert W. Bond, the two-story, brick and stone building stands prominently at the primary intersection in town, directly across the street from the Drexel Hotel, also designed by Bond, built almost simultaneously with the IOOF Hall, and also listed in the National Register.

--> Download the Vale I.O.O.F. Hall nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Eagle Point National Cemetery, Jackson County, Eagle Point,
Listed September 13, 2016
Eagle Point National Cemetery was originally created in 1952 to serve the burial needs of veterans domiciled at Camp White, a World War II-era military training center near Medford, Oregon. It is located one mile east of Eagle Point and 14 miles northeast of Medford, in Jackson County. Located along Riley Road at the southern end of the Rogue River Valley, the 43-acre cemetery provides scenic views of the city of Eagle Point and the surrounding valley. The first burial at Eagle Point National Cemetery occurred in March 1952; by the time of the cemetery dedication on Memorial Day, there were six interments. The 7.5 developed acres of the cemetery remained relatively unchanged until the late 1980s. In 1973, the cemetery entered the national cemetery system following the consolidation of veterans’ cemeteries under the authority of the Veterans Administration (VA). After becoming a national cemetery, the property underwent gradual improvements to accommodate the growing veteran population and to provide new burial space for the national cemetery system. As a result, Eagle Point National Cemetery reflects the evolution of the VA’s cemetery program from one of caring for veterans through domiciliary programs to overseeing the national cemetery system.
Eagle Point National Cemetery is one of two national cemeteries in Oregon. The second is Willamette National Cemetery, which was the first national cemetery in the northwest United States and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in July, 2016. As of February 2016, Eagle Point National Cemetery contains 19,893 interments. With burials beginning in 1951, Willamette National Cemetery contained 151,043 interments as of June 2012.

--> Download the Eagle Point National Cemetery nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

 

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Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed September 6, 2016

The 1909 church in the Albina neighborhood, on Portland’s east side, was purchased by the congregation in 1951 and remodeled to its current appearance in 1958. The congregation was established in 1944 in a housing development for war-time workers employed in the nearby shipyards. After the war, the church moved to the Albina neighborhood of Portland, where African Americans were forced to live in this era due to discriminatory housing practices. The congregation grew rapidly under the leadership of Reverend O.B. Williams and by the early 1950s needed more space. They engaged architect Hubert Athling Williams, who renovated the Gothic Revival church, giving it the modern appearance it has today. In their nearly 50-year tenure at the helm of the Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church, Reverend Williams and his wife Willia offered not only spiritual leadership to the congregation, but also provided education, social services and a real community center. Additionally, the church encouraged civic and social engagement, which was enhanced by Williams’ extensive social and political connections. The church became central to the civil rights movement, as it played out locally, regionally, and nationally, with lectures and rallies by civil rights leaders and activists such as the national president of the NAACP, Roy Wilkins, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In 1968 the church hosted the Portland’s memorial service for the slain Martin Luther King, Jr., which was attended by Senator Mark Hatfield, Governor Tom McCall, Portland mayor Terry Schrunk, a host of municipal dignitaries, and a crowd of over 1,500 persons. The church’s congregation, which was locally based historically, has been impacted by urban renewal, institutional expansion, and now gentrification. Nonetheless, the institution continues in a leadership position in the African American community. Today the building is one of the few remaining historic structures in Albina that is directly associated with the Civil Rights movement.

-->Download the Vancouver Avenue First Baptist Church nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Willamette National Cemetery, Multnomah & Clackamas County, Portland,
 Listed July 5, 2016

The 1950 Willamette National Cemetery is located approximately 10 miles southeast of Portland in Clackamas and Multnomah Counties, Oregon. Situated along Mt. Scott Boulevard, the 307-acre cemetery provides scenic views of four mountains, the City of Portland, and the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. The Willamette National Cemetery was the first national cemetery in the northwest United States, followed by the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Honolulu, HI) and Puerto Rico National Cemetery (Bayamon, PR). Though authorized by Congress in 1941, the cemetery’s development was delayed by the onset of World War II. After the war, the establishment of new national cemeteries was necessary to accommodate the growing veteran population.  With burials beginning in 1951, Willamette National Cemetery contained 151,043 interments as of June 2012.
The Willamette National Cemetery utilizes only flat granite markers, rather than upright marble markers. This modern aesthetic, influenced by the lawn and memorial park movements, takes advantage of the site’s natural scenic qualities, allowing native trees and uninterrupted views to define the cemetery. The National Park Service has stated that all National Cemeteries are to be considered eligible for listing in the National Register “as a result of their Congressional designation as nationally significant places of burial and commemoration.” Willamette National Cemetery is one of two in Oregon. The second cemetery, Eagle Point National Cemetery, is significant in part for its historic association with Camp White, a World War II-era military training center in Jackson County. The Eagle Point National Cemetery was recommended for listing in the National Register by the Oregon State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation in their February 2016 meeting.
 
--> Download the Willamette National Cemetery nomination [pdf] 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Zane Grey Cabin, Josephine County, Galice, Listed June 28, 2016
The site known as the Zane Grey cabin is eligible for listing for its association with author Zane Grey (1872-1939).  This 32-acre site which includes the Zane Grey cabin, a circa 1925 wooden river boat used by Zane Grey to access the remote property, and an existing 1500’ long dry-stacked stone fence that Zane Grey incorporated into his landscape after he acquired the property. While this cabin did not serve as Zane Grey’s primary residence, it was built by, and used by Grey as a retreat from 1926 to 1935. During this time Grey authored more than 20 books and numerous magazine articles, some of which were either written at the cabin, used the lower Rogue River for a setting, or were inspired by his time at the cabin and along the lower Rogue River.

 

--> Download the Zane Grey Cabin nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Antelope School, Wasco County, Antelope, Listed June 7, 2016
The Antelope School is a significant representative of rural education in central Oregon during the first half of the twentieth century. A testament to the continued commitment to education of the residents of the town and vicinity, since its completion in 1925 it has been by far the most substantial building in Antelope, occupying the most prominent parcel in town, filling a wide variety of community roles. The school is the third built in Antelope, and was the central focus of education in the surrounding area for 60 years. The Antelope School stands out among other rural schools of its period because of its size and breadth of education offered (including primary through secondary until 1936), designed to meet the state requirements for Standard Schools at all grade levels through that time. Although after 1936 the Antelope School no longer provided instruction for all grade levels, it continued to provide instruction at the elementary and intermediate levels until 1983, when it was closed as a public school, an event that is associated with the Rajneesh movement’s establishment of political dominance of the town. From its construction in 1925 to the present, the school has been a focus of community activity, hosting school activities, community events, and locally produced plays. The school has also functioned as the local polling place and the seat of local government, concurrent with and subsequent to its role as a place of formal education. The Antelope School is also locally significant for its architecture as a unique example of a formal, concrete Classical Revival-style school building in this extremely rural setting where one and two-room, wooden schoolhouses are far more typical.
 
--> Download the Antelope School nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Charles Hunter Hamlin House, Multnomah County, Gresham, Listed June 7, 2016

The Hamlin-Johnson House, located at the corner of SE Lusted Road and SE 282nd Avenue outside of Gresham, was constructed circa 1888. The house is associated with early steamboat engineer Charles Hamlin and later with the Reverend Jonas Johnson and his family, who owned the house for six decades. Johnson was a pastor at the Swedish Powell Valley Church. Today the house represents an increasingly rare, rural residential property from this era of development in Gresham.

 

 

-->Download the Charles Hunter Hamlin House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

 

W. Leland James House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed May 23, 2016
The 1929 W. Leland James House, designed by Portland architect Harold Doty in the English Arts & Crafts style, was commissioned by businessman W. Leland James. James founded Consolidated Freightways, a nationwide trucking firm that eventually became Con-Way, and Freightliner, a manufacturer of semi-trucks. James is credited with developing and implementing the concept of long-haul trucking, at a time when railroads still dominated the shipping industry. He had the house, which sits prominently on its site in the Terwilliger neighborhood, designed and built during a high point in his career. It was later occupied by William Gruber, the inventor of the View-Master.  Architect Harold Doty was a long-time collaborator with Wade Pipes. Although not as well-known as some of his contemporaries, his work was nonetheless published in the national architectural journal Architectural Record, and an exhibit and lecture on his work was held at the Portland Art Museum after his death in 1943. The W. Leland James House was noted in Classic Houses of Portland, Oregon as Doty’s “finest work.”
 
--> Download the W. Leland James House nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Fairview City Jail, Multnomah County, Fairview, Listed May 23, 2016
The Fairview City Jail was constructed in 1915. It never really served as a jail, but was considered necessary after Fairview adopted a series of anti-crime and anti-vice measures after its incorporation in 1908. It was constructed as an annex to the 1912 City Hall, which functioned as a City Hall, general store, library, post office, dance floor and theater. After the City Hall was demolished in 1979, the jail was a freestanding building in city park. Today the simple concrete building functions as a museum. It is the last original correctional facility remaining in Multnomah County.

--> Download the Fairview City Jail nomination [pdf]

-->  View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Arleta Branch Library, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 15, 2016
Constructed in 1918 using Carnegie Corporation grant funds, the brick Colonial Revival-style Arleta Branch Library, more recently known as the Wikman Building, was designed by well-known Portland architect Folger Johnson. The Arleta Branch Library is one of thirty-one Carnegie libraries built in Oregon, and one of seven built in the Portland area during the 1910s and early 1920s. Its Colonial Revival style is typical of this period of architecture in general, as well as reflective of Carnegie Corporation guidelines for library design. The Arleta Branch Library was the sixth Carnegie library to be constructed as part of the Library Association of Portland’s (now Multnomah County’s) branch library system and served its surrounding community through 1971 when city library services were centralized.

 

--> Download the Arleta Branch Library nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Pilot Butte Canal Historic District, Deschutes County, Bend, Listed February 8, 2016
The construction of the Pilot Butte Canal was a result of the vision of east-coast real-estate investor Alexander McClurg Drake. Drake sought to irrigate the lands surrounding the Deschutes River under the provisions of the federal Carey Desert Lands Act, which encouraged the establishment of irrigated farms in the arid West. Construction on the canal began in 1903. The critical Cooley Road to Yeoman Road Segment connected the already-constructed flume from the Deschutes River and traversed the basalt bedrock on its way north. However, the section was particularly difficult due to the terrain, and resources were concentrated here. Laborers using horse-drawn Fresno Scrapers and steam-powered drills finished this portion of the canal on February 10, 1905. The canal’s completion spurred rapid growth and development of central Oregon, including the establishment of Bend, Redmond, and other communities. It also provided an economic boost to the entire state with the growth of the agriculture and timber industries. The basalt floor and sides of the Cooley Road – Yeoman Road Segment of the Pilot Butte Canal still show the tooling marks left by the scrapers and the steam drills, and its rough, unfinished nature reflects both the difficulty in digging the canal and the importance of finishing the project quickly. The National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 listed the Pilot Butte Canal segment in the National Register after an extensive public process beginning in December 2014. The review process included comments from the Central Oregon Irrigation Company, residents, advocacy groups, and local, state, and federal agencies. NPS’ decision is based only on the National Register criteria, which considers the degree to which the property retains its historic appearance and its historic importance.

 
--> Download the Pilot Butte Canal Historic District nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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