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Properties Recently Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Full text nominations for Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the last six months can be found below. If a property is not listed below, please contact Tracy Zeller at (503) 986-0690 or Tracy.Zeller@oregon.gov for an electronic or paper copy. 
 
A complete list of inventoried and National Register-listed properties is available online through the Oregon Historic Sites Database

Aloha Farmhouse, Washington County, Beaverton, Listed September 30, 2014
The Aloha Farmhouse, a modest Craftsman-inspired residence built about 1915, was remodeled by Pietro Belluschi, Oregon’s most renowned 20th century architect, for his own use in 1944 and again about 1946. The period of time in which Belluschi and his family lived in the farmhouse, which was located on a rural, six-acre site with an orchard at that time, was one of the most important and prolific of Belluschi’s career. It was the period preceding his acceptance of the position of Dean of the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in which he established the reputation that would lead to the next phase of his long and successful career. Belluschi bought the farmhouse when his boys were small and needed room to grow. He remodeled the house, using the design vocabulary that he had been experimenting with in such Northwest Regional-style houses as his previous Council Crest home, the Philip Joss house, and the Dr. and Mrs. Burkes house, all in Portland. Today the house is little changed from when Belluschi returned to Portland with his family in 1948. It still retains its rustic character, which Belluschi admired when he purchased the house and was careful to preserve in the renovation. Belluschi and his family left Portland for the east coast in early 1951. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, he began a successful architectural consulting practice there, on some of the highest profile projects in the country, including the Juilliard School in New York and St. Mary’s Cathedral in San Francisco. He returned to Portland in 1973, taking up residence in the Burkes house that he had designed in the mid-1940s. Belluschi died in 1994, at the age of 94. His wife Marjorie lived in the house until 2009. It is now the home of Marti and Anthony Belluschi, Pietro Belluschi’s son, who is also an architect. The Aloha Farmhouse is the last remaining residence that Belluschi designed for himself in the Portland area that also retains its historic character.
 
--> Download the Aloha Farmhouse nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

 

Paisley Five Mile Caves, County and City redacted, Listed September 24, 2014

Archaeological excavations at the site has produced evidence of human occupation in Oregon beginning 14,300 years ago, nearly 1,000 years earlier than previously thought. The occupation of Paisley Five Mile Point Caves predates the appearance of “Clovis” sites by more than 1,000 years.  Clovis sites characterized by a distinctive projectile point have been documented throughout many regions of the U.S. and for many years been widely accepted as evidence for the first human settlement of the Americas.  Led by Dr. Dennis Jenkins of the University of Oregon (UO), a team of researchers conducted archaeological excavations and extensive laboratory analyses to amass information challenging the “Clovis First” hypothesis.  Along with stemmed projectile points, grinding stones (for grinding plant materials), modified animal bone and woven plant fiber cordage, Jenkins’ team recovered  coprolites (feces) containing human DNA involving testing by multiple independent laboratories.   Over 200 coprolites were radiocarbon dated to pre-Clovis times.  The discovery by UO researchers of 14,300-year-old human feces demonstrates the presence of an ancient human population in America’s FarWest at the end of the last Ice Age. The site is located on land managed by the U.S. Department of Interior-- Bureau of Land Management. Now a sagebrush steppe vegetation community, the Paisley site once was grassy plains surrounding a lake, marsh and river.  Camel, bison, horse and waterfowl bones have been found in the area.  The people living there 14,300 years ago were gathering and consuming aromatic roots, for which they would have needed special knowledge that would have developed over time.

--> Download the Paisley Five Mile Caves (redacted) nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

Water & Myrtle Honeyman House, Multnomah Co, Portland, Listed September 10, 2014
The Honeyman House was designed by Portland architect David C. Lewis in the Tudor Revival style and constructed on Northwest Cornell Road, west of downtown Portland, in 1911. Walter Honeyman was a member of the second generation of the Honeyman family, which was associated with Honeyman Hardware Company for three generations. He worked for the company beginning after graduation from high school, and served as its secretary from 1917 until about 1939. The architect, David C. Lewis, who studied architecture in New York and Paris, is best known for his Foreign Exhibits building for Portland’s 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition and the Oregon State building for Seattle’s 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. He was admired in architectural circles for his 1907 Board of Trade Building in Portland, which was widely published.  His residences were also admired however. The Honeyman residence was published in Pacific Coast Architect in 1913.

--> Download the Honeyman House nomination [pdf]
 
--> View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

 

Hanthorn Apartments, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed August 25, 2014
The Hanthorn Apartments was constructed in 1910 in downtown Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. The six-story apartment building represents one of a collection of ‘modern’ apartment and office buildings that redefined downtown Portland in the construction boom following Portland’s 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition. It is an attractive, brick-clad building, purpose-built for apartments, which was a new building type for Portland at that time.  Apartment buildings constructed through the 1920s were designed with many amenities to increase the attractiveness of urban, apartment living to the middle class. The Hanthorn Apartments, also known as the Lexington Apartments, was closed for building code violations in the 1980s. It was then sold and modernized as affordable housing. The property was recently upgraded again, and once again serves as affordable housing.
 
--> Download the Hanthorn Apartments nomination [pdf]
 
--> View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

 

Heathman Hotel, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed August 25, 2014
The Heathman Hotel was constructed in 1926 in downtown Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon for hotelier George Heathman. The eleven-story hotel, located at the north end of the South Park Blocks, was constructed as a luxury hotel. It was joined by the New Heathman Hotel, located at 1001 SW Broadway in 1927, and remains a luxury hotel to date.
Designed by the prominent Portland architecture firm of Claussen and Claussen, the handsome building is clad in tapestry brick and finished in terra cotta trim. The two Heathman Hotels were among 184 new buildings, 38 of which were hotels, constructed in downtown Portland between 1915 and 1931.  Four of these were “first class” hotels. Today less than half of the 184 buildings remain. The Heathman Hotel continued to be used for that purpose through the 1980s, when it was closed for building code violations. It was then sold and modernized as affordable housing. The property was recently upgraded again, and once again serves as affordable housing.
--> Dowload the Heathman Hotel nomination [pdf]
 
--> View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]
 
 
Woodlark Building, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed August 8, 2014

The Woodlark Building was constructed in 1911-12 in downtown Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. The nine-story building is sited within the Portland Park Blocks. It is a unique building. Although it has the appearance of an office building, it was originally constructed as a retail and wholesale pharmacy operation for the Woodard, Clarke & Company and Clarke-Woodward Drug Company. The firms were among the most successful pharmaceutical companies in the Pacific Northwest from the late 19th through the early 20th century.  The building was designed by the prominent Portland architecture firm of Doyle, Patterson and Beach in the Commercial style, with an elaborate cornice, prominent entry, and terra cotta detailing. The building’s original wood windows remain above the storefront retail and mezzanine levels, which have been remodeled over time.  The structure was part of the major building boom that followed the Lewis & Clark Exposition, held in Portland in 1905, which led to the expansion of the city to the west. The retail and wholesale drug companies were sold in 1924 and the upper floors of the building converted to office space. It has continued in retail and office uses since that time.

--> Dowload the Woodlark Building nomination [pdf]

--> View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

99W Drive-In Theatre, Yamhill County, Newberg, Listed July 11, 2014

The 99W Drive-In Theatre was constructed in 1953 and opened July 31, 1953, showing “Sea Devils” with Rock Hudson and Yvonne DiCarlo and “Under the Sahara.”  It was constructed by Ted Francis and is now operated by a third-generation member of the Francis family, Brian Francis. The first drive-in theater was developed in New Jersey in 1933.  After World War II the outdoor drive-in became increasingly popular, particularly for family entertainment, growing in numbers in Oregon from three in 1948 to 69 in 1959.  In the 1970s the popularity of the drive-in declined with the rise of the multi-plex.  To compete, the Francis family built the Twin Cinemas on the grounds, which is still in operation today.  Today, the 99W Drive-In is enjoying a resurgence in popularity.  Its on-going operation is assured by the fact that it just won a new digital projector in thecontest “Project Drive-In,” one of ten in the country.

-->Download the 99W Drive-In Theatre nomination [pdf]

-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

Linkville Pioneer Cemetery, Klamath County, Klamath Falls, Listed July 11, 2014

The Linkville Pioneer Cemetery was established at this location in 1885, after having been moved from downtown in order to establish what was later called the Ankeny Canal.  The cemetery as it currently appears is a result of a 1931 renovation, when the citizens of Klamath Falls sought to improve the cemetery’s appearance.  The formal stone entries, wire fencing, and most of the trees seen at the cemetery today are part of this 1931 design.  The history embodied in the markers in the cemetery include the range wars of the late 1800s and early 1900s in the Klamath Falls area; the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II at the Tule Lake Segregation Center, commemorated by several graves; and three graves of the victims of a Japanese balloon bomb, also associated with World War II.  Today the cemetery still maintains its panoramic views of the city, despite the residential development that surrounds it.

-->Download the Linkville Pioneer Cemetery nomination [pdf]

-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

Fish Lake Guard Station, Linn County, McKenzie Bridge, Listed June 27, 2014

Built by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) for the Santiam National Forest (later Willamette National Forest) between 1906 and 1934, the centrally-located Fish Lake Guard Station provided fire crews and Forest staff with an administrative base and pack animal remount station from which to provide conservation management for the forest and fire protection. Later, the Fish Lake Guard Station served as an essential catalyst in managing designated wilderness areas near the Willamette National Forest after the passage of the Wilderness Act. Signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on September 3, 1964, the Wilderness Act mandated that the National Park Service, USFS, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service review all lands under their jurisdiction and designate appropriate tracts as National Wilderness areas to be protected in their natural condition. The station’s rustic-style buildings are representative examples of USFS administrative architecture built by Forest employees and the CCC using USFS and CCC plans and rustic design, made with local, natural materials to blend with the surrounding landscape.

-->Download the Fish Lake Guard Station nomination [pdf]

-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

Oregon City Municipal Elevator, Clackamas County, Oregon City, Listed May 15, 2014
The Oregon City Municipal Elevator is a 130-foot-tall, public elevator tower rising from an underground tunnel in historic downtown Oregon City to connect with the city’s second level atop a bluff to the east. The elevator is a Modern, reinforced concrete structure designed by Gordon E. Trapp and constructed by the Portland engineering firm of James & Yost in 1955. This unique structure was designed to be futuristic in style and incorporates minimal ornament.  Possibly its most spectacular feature is the views from the viewing platform.  A unique series of prints installed on the platform walls provides changing, historical views of the downtown and the Willamette River that complements the 300-degree view.  The elevator is integrated with the McLoughlin Promenade and the Grand Staircase extending from the bluff to the downtown, which are also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

-->Download the Oregon City Municipal Elevator nomination [pdf]
--> View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

Oregon City Carnegie Library, Clackamas County, Oregon City, Listed May 15, 2014

The Oregon City Carnegie Library was constructed in 1913 with funding from steel magnet Andrew Carnegie.  It is one of over 1,500 libraries built throughout the country by the philanthropist.  Designed in the American Renaissance style, this handsome, brick-clad structure has served Oregon City nearly continuously from its construction to the present.  A restoration in 2010 removed an addition to the building, bringing it back to its original appearance.


-->Download the Oregon City Carnegie Library nomination [pdf]

-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

McLoughlin Promenade, Clackamas County, Oregon City, Listed May 15, 2014

The McLoughlin Promenade, a historic park site along the edge of Oregon City’s prominent bluff, was constructed on land donated for that purpose by Dr. John McLoughlin in 1851.  It consists of three major parts:  a 2,300-foot-long basalt stone and concrete pathway that runs along the bluff; the Grand Staircase, which traverses the bluff; and Singer Falls, a man-made waterfall with five separate tiers that takes Singer Creek from the top of the bluff, down the cliff face, to the historic downtown.  The Promenade was constructed with the help of the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression and was completed in 1939.  Pedestrians can also travel from the top of the bluff to the downtown in this area via the Oregon City Municipal Elevator, which is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  The Promenade was recently restored and a new art installation added at the base of the Falls in 2011.  These facilities, along with the spectacular views from the Promenade, ensure the continued popularity of this site with visitors and residents alike.

-->Download the McLoughlin Promenade nomination [pdf]

-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]

Astoria Marine Construction Company, Clatsop County, Astoria, Listed January 8, 2014

Located at 92134 Front Road where the where the Lewis & Clark River meets Jeffers Slough, the Astoria Marine Construction Company (AMCCO) Historic District is situated in a relatively rural area called Jeffers Gardens, separated from the city of Astoria by Youngs Bay. Joseph Dyer, Acme Mansker, and Clair Mansker established AMCCO, originally called Astoria Shipbuilding, in 1922. The company initially built fishing boats and luxury sailing vessels. During World War II and the Korean War, AMCCO was awarded multiple military contracts. In order to build these larger ships for the United States Navy, the shipyard expanded dramatically. The majority of the district’s extant buildings were constructed in 1941 and 1942. The shipyard became best known during the Korean War, when in 1952 it was the lead shipyard in the country to construct a specific type of ocean-going minesweeper. AMCCO is predominately made up of industrial buildings and structures, each built to serve a specific function in the operation of a shipyard, including a large boat shop complex, a machine shop complex, an office, four marine ways, a dock complex, and an assortment of ancillary support buildings. Today the small shipyard is largely intact, having lost only a few buildings. The company continues to operate, mainly repairing fishing vessels.

 -->Download the Astoria Marine Construction Company nomination [pdf]

-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]
Rinehart Building, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed December 24 2013

The two-story blond-brick Rinehart Building was constructed in 1910 along an important streetcar line in Portland’s historic Albina neighborhood. It is notable as one of the few remaining commercial buildings in Albina associated with the social and cultural fabric of the African American community. In 1939 Albina was already home to the majority of Portland’s African American population. The number of African Americans in Portland swelled during WWII to fill the large number of war-time shipbuilding jobs, and discriminatory housing practices funneled these new residents to the Albina area. After the war, African American-owned businesses along Williams Avenue flourished. The Rinehart Building was home to a number of African American-owned enterprises, including the Cleo-Lilliann Social Club. Begun in the 1950s, the Club served as a community and charitable organization that provided entertainment, social support, and fundraising, and was a forum for community activism. The Club hosted many notable African American musicians, such as B. B. King and George Foreman. When the Club closed in 2001 it was considered to be one of the oldest African American social organizations of its kind in Oregon.

-->Download the Rinehart Building nomination [pdf]
-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]
Salvation Army Industrial Home, Multnomah Co, Portland, Listed December 5, 2013

The three-story Salvation Army Industrial Home building was constructed in 1893 and expanded and remodeled in 1930 to the plans of architect Frederick Manson White.  The structure, which is now a contributing building in the East Portland Grand Avenue Historic District, was used by the Salvation Army to provide work and shelter for homeless, unemployed men beginning in 1913.  It served as a place where residents would sort and prepare recyclable and reusable items for re-sale, and was Portland’s longest running second-hand charity shop until 2010, when it was closed.  The building is currently being rehabilitated for retail uses.

-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]
Petersen Rock Garden, Deschutes County, Redmond, Listed October 30, 2013

Petersen Rock Garden was designed and constructed by Danish immigrant Rasmus Christian Petersen from about the time he retired from farming, in the winter of 1935-36 until his death in 1952.   Located in rural Deschutes County between the cities of Redmond and Bend, Petersen Rock Garden was open to the public from the beginning, with only a suggested donation.  The year of his death a reported 200,000 people visited the popular site. Petersen constructed the garden features from volcanic and river rock and semi-precious stones that he collected from around the region and the country, which he assembled into sculptures and vignettes that expressed his personal visions and views, such as his Statue of Liberty, as well as fanciful buildings and narratives.  He also built a museum on the site to showcase the more interesting stones in his collection, including his collection of fluorescent minerals.  Petersen developed the rock garden on his original homestead, which he settled in 1906.  Today the property is about twelve acres in size, with the gardens occupying approximately four acres, which also include ponds and other water features, Petersen’s own Craftsman bungalow, his workshop where he constructed the features, the museum, a restaurant from the 1950s, and landscape features.  Today Petersen Rock Garden is owned and operated by a descendent of the family, and is still open to the public.  

-->Download the Petersen Rock Garden nomination [pdf]
-->View record in the Oregon Historic Sites Database [link]