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Properties Recently Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Full text nominations for Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the last six months can be found below. If a property is not listed below, please contact Tracy Zeller at (503) 986-0690 or Tracy.Zeller@oregon.gov for an electronic or paper copy. 
 
A complete list of inventoried and National Register-listed properties is available online through the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

Reed-Cobb-Bowser House & Barn, Josephine County, Merlin, Listed October 30, 2017

The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House and Barn is located on Merlin Road in the unincorporated town of Merlin, approximately seven miles northwest of Grants Pass, in rural Josephine County. Built in 1910-11, the 2-1/2 story Craftsman-style house is associated with early 20th century movement in many parts of western Oregon to promote residential-agricultural development on relatively small, usually 5 to 10-acre parcels. In 1909, a group of wealthy investors led by brothers William T. and Franklin E. Reed began purchasing property around Merlin for the purpose of both speculating on the land itself and fostering the development of an orchard economy in the area. The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House was originally built in 1910-11 as the headquarters and clubhouse for what became known as the Country Club Orchard development, as well as the residence of William T. Reed’s daughters, Grace and Marian Reed. Though initially successful, the project soon faltered, and by the early 1920s, undeveloped land began to be sold off to satisfy debt. The house remained in the ownership of William T. Reed, who, upon his death in 1924, passed ownership to Marian and Grace. Grace lived in the house with her husband, Everett Cobb until 1936, when the house was sold to miner Heber E. Bowser and his wife, Clementine, the wealthy heiress of Portland family wealth. Clementine, in addition to owning and managing several successful mines in the area, was also a well-known equestrian, and is responsible for the large and well-appointed horse barn that accompanies the house on the National Register. In addition to its association with the events of local development, the house is also recognized as an exceptional example of the Craftsman style of architecture, widely popular across the United States during the early 20th century. 

--> Download the Reed-Cobb-Bowser House & Barn nomination [pdf]
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Peacock Lane Historic District, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed October 30, 2017

Peacock Lane, a small, distinctive neighborhood comprising 32 residences located between SE Stark and SE Belmont Streets, in place of SE 40th Avenue in the east Portland grid. It was developed as a small, planned community between 1923 and 1930 by Richard Fleming Wassell, real estate developer and designer of most of the houses in the district. The district is well-known throughout the City of Portland for its collection of uniquely unified residential architecture, all of which reflect Tudor Revival and English Cottage styles based on medieval European precedents. The Peacock Lane Historic District is listed in the National Register of Historic Places for its unified architectural design language, and for its early accommodation of the automobile, most notably demonstrated by the inclusion of attached and detached garages on every property. In addition to these features, for which the district was listed through the Multiple Property Submission, “Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960,” the district is widely recognized for its highly-anticipated annual Christmas Lights display, which draws thousands of visitors to the district during the holiday season.

--> Download the Peacock Lane Historic District nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Redmond Downtown Historic District, Deschutes County, Redmond,
Listed October 30, 2017

The Redmond Downtown Historic District embraces the historic commercial core of Redmond, including 43 downtown buildings located primarily along SW 6th Street roughly between SW Forest Avenue and SW Cascade Avenue.  The historic district reflects the period of economic and commercial growth in Redmond between 1910 and 1960, beginning with the years shortly after the founding of the city, when the earliest remaining downtown buildings were constructed, up through the end of major expansion in the post-World War II era. During this period, the population of Redmond expanded from 216 in 1910 to 3,340 in 1960. Architecturally, the district demonstrates the continuity of dominant design styles during the pre-war period of the twentieth century, including Colonial Revival, Classical Revival, Art Deco, and Streamlined Moderne styles, and extending to the early post-war architectural styles, in particular, the International Style.

--> Download the Redmond Downtown Historic District nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Foster-Simmons House, Lane County, Eugene, Listed October 30, 2017
The Foster-Simmons House, located at 417 E 13th Avenue, in the West University neighborhood of Eugene, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as an excellent, nearly intact example of the Craftsman style of residential architecture. It was built for $3000 in 1913 by attorney Orla H. Foster and his wife, Maidee, who lived in the house until 1921, when it was sold to Earl C. Simmons, owner of the E.C. Simmons Ford Dealership. After passing through a series of short-term owners, the house was offered for rent to University students beginning during the 1930s. From the 1940s until 1975, the home was owned and occupied by Mabel and Elroy Reagan. Since 1975, the house has been the home of the Eugene chapter of Young Life, a Christian youth support and development organization. The three-bedroom house displays many characteristic features of the Craftsman style, including varied exterior siding and window types, open eaves, a projecting front porch with heavy concrete piers and exposed structural elements, and a modest porte cochere. Interior elements include an open floor plan, built-in features, and an abundance of simple but elegant woodwork. The house retains a high degree of interior and exterior integrity, and clearly conveys its style and period of construction through its original form, features, and materials. As one of only six single-family Craftsman dwellings in the fragile West University area that have been evaluated as being National Register-eligible, the Foster-Simmons House is a stand-out example of its type in the neighborhood and in Eugene.

--> Download the Foster-Simmons House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Pilot Butte Canal: Downtown Redmond Segment Historic District, Deschutes County, Redmond, Listed July 10, 2017
The Pilot Butte Canal, which is listed under the Carey and Reclamation Acts Irrigation Projects in Oregon 1901-1978 Multiple Property Documentation, is the backbone of one of the two irrigation systems that form what is known as the Central Oregon Project in the Upper Deschutes River basin. The Central Oregon Project was a prominent example of an irrigation project resulting from the provisions of the Carey Desert Land Act (Carey Act), and one that had a tremendous impact on the formation and development of central Oregon. As a principal element of the Central Oregon Project, the Pilot Butte Canal is closely associated with early homesteading and settlement efforts in the Upper Deschutes River basin, and the use of irrigation as a means to improve agricultural production, overcome harsh environmental conditions, and provide a sustainable livelihood with limited resources in the region. Throughout its history the Pilot Butte Canal provided water for agricultural use in Deschutes County, leading to the founding, initial development, and continued growth of the cities of Bend, Redmond, and other communities. The Pilot Butte Canal: Downtown Redmond Segment Historic District is approximately 6,780 feet long, from approximately NW Dogwood Street at the south, where the open canal emerges from underground pipe, to approximately NW Quince Avenue at the north, where it returns to pipe. This portion of the canal is directly associated with the founding of Redmond, which was laid out along it, adjacent to the site of the Frank T. and Josephine Redmond homestead.

--> Download the Pilot Butte Canal: Downtown Redmond Segment Historic District nomination [pdf]
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Portland Sanitarium Nurses' Quarters, Multnomah County, Portland,                    Listed July 3, 2017
The Nurses’ Quarters served the student nurses and full-time nurses of the Portland Sanitarium, a hospital operated by the Seventh Day Adventists. The building is emblematic of the changing position of nursing as an educational field and profession. During the early- and mid-twentieth century, the health care industry was evolving. As the methods of treatment changed, so too did the means of educating medical professionals. At this time nursing education shifted from an apprenticeship-like training regime with long hours of hands-on hospital work to a pre-professional curriculum paired with shifts at the hospital. Improvements and changing features of Nurses’ Quarters were parallel to the changes in nursing education and professional nursing, creating less of a room-and-board arrangement and more of a round-the-clock studying and on-call hospital work setting.
 
The Portland Sanitarium Nurses’ Quarters is locally significant and eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A for its association with Health/Medicine. This building was designated a historic landmark by the City of Portland on September 25, 2016.


--> Download the Portland Sanitarium Nurses' Quarters nomination [pdf]
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Pine Grove Community House, Tillamook County, Manzanita, Listed July 3, 2017
Built in 1933, the Pine Grove Community House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A for the building’s association with the founding of the City of Manzanita and its local government, establishment of community social events, and the gradual evolution of the town to a full-fledged community and center for coastal recreation.  Pine Grove represents the first tangible civic project of the first residents of Manzanita who, with no early municipal government, formed their own community group to address the needs and management of their small town.  In the absence of more formal, city-run facilities, the Pine Grove Community House served as Manzanita’s first City Hall and library.  Pine Grove not only functioned as Manzanita’s early central government, but hosted meetings resulting in the formation of the first fire and police departments.  The Pine Grove Community House has grown with the City of Manzanita and served many functions that are now carried on in different facilities, but it was at the Pine Grove that all of these activities began and flourished sufficiently to create the need for expansion beyond the building in which they began.  Among the founders was Ben S. Lane, who would later serve the City of Manzanita as its first mayor and serving the City in that capacity for thirteen years.  Lane’s wife, Johanna Lane, brought a love for reading and community service that made the Lanes a formidable couple.  The Pine Grove Community House tells part of the story of coastal recreation towns and the settlement of the Oregon Coast, including the transition from mere vacation destination to a formal community and eventual municipality. 

--> Download the Pine Grove Community House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Jacob Clearwater Farmhouse, Lane County, Springfield, Listed July 3, 2017
The 1874 Jacob and Missouri Benner Clearwater House is locally significant under National Register Criterion C, in the area of architecture.  The Clearwater family, including sons Jacob and James, participated in the western migration of the mid-to-late 1800s to Oregon, traveling   the Oregon Trail, like so many before them.  The family settled on 320 acres outside of Springfield, Oregon, along the Middle Fork of the Willamette River in the Willamette Valley, in 1865.  They proceeded to clear the land and begin farming the land on which the Jacob Clearwater Farmhouse is still located.  Jacob married Missouri Benner in 1888 and the couple and their family resided at this location, engaging in row crop cultivation, dairy and beef cattle ranching, and hop farming.  Prior to his marriage, Jacob and his father constructed the house known as the Jacob and Missouri Benner Clearwater Farmhouse today.  The house is an excellent, rural example of the Gothic Revival style in Lane County.  It is one of only four previously identified, remaining single-family residences built before 1874 in Springfield.  Although the style and type were once relatively common, the Clearwater Farmhouse is the only example of the centered gable subtype of the Gothic Revival style extant in Springfield today.  The house retains good integrity, and clearly conveys its historic significance, evident in its appearance and style, including its massing, materials, and overall design.

--> Download the Jacob Clearwater Farmhouse nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Triangle Lake Round Barn, Lane County, Blachly, Listed July 3, 2017
John P. Sumich completed construction of the round barn in 1949, three years after construction began in 1946. Sumich’s use of concrete blocks and other locally sourced materials represents a creative interpretation of the round barn type that has been used in the United States beginning in the 1800’s into the early 20th century, when it became popularized by agricultural schools for its efficiency. The historic building is a unique vernacular expression of a round dairy barn type that was popularized in the 1910s and 1920s for its reputation for enhancing farm practice efficiency and improving sanitary conditions. While it is unclear exactly where Sumich saw the original design that inspired him, there was no similar round barn construction in Oregon. The barn is eligible under National Register Criterion C for architecture as a local example of a vernacular round dairy barn type.  During this time in Lane County, dairying and creameries continued to develop as a major industry.  The Lake Creek Valley, where the barn is located, was also a thriving timber community with several sawmills, shingle mills, and the churches, schools, post offices and general stores that supported the population in this time frame.  The round barn was and remains a landmark in the community.

--> Download the Triangle Lake Round Barn nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Dr. Homer H. Harris House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 7, 2017
The Dr. Harris House was designed in the Northwest Regional style by designer/builder Wilbur Mark Perrault and constructed in 1957 in the Council Crest neighborhood of Portland’s southwest hills.  The house was designed for Dr. Homer H. Harris, a leading forensic pathologist in the State of Oregon and director of the Oregon State Crime Laboratory from 1951 to 1955.  Harris was an innovator in the emerging field of forensic pathology.  Before taking on the position of Director of the crime lab, Harris apprenticed with the chief medical examiner of New York City, learning the latest technics in forensic medicine and crime investigation.  His last position before retirement was as Deputy Chief Medical Examiner for Multnomah County.  Designer/builder Mark Perrault moved to Portland from his native Montana to work building defense housing during World War II.  He became a very successful builder in the competitive post-World War II environment.  He is best known for developing a series of product lines that could be customized in varying degrees, directed at middle class clients, particularly those looking for a vacation or second home.  Later in his career he focused on developing popular prototype residences that could be mass-marketed.  The one-story Harris house sits high within its narrow, steep lot over a raised basement.  It is integrated with its outdoor living areas through nearly floor-to-ceiling windows encircling the rear of the house and overlooking asymmetrical, stepped decks and a 1956 landscape designed by landscape architect Fairbanks D. Chandler.  An outstanding feature of the house, which is one of Perrault’s early custom homes, is the arrangement of the rooms on both floors around a large, oversized brick island that organizes the spaces around it, in addition to serving the three fireplaces of the house. 

--> Download the Dr. Homer H. Harris Harris House nomination [pdf]
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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US Post Office, Columbia County, Scappoose, Listed January 31, 2017

The Scappoose Post Office opened in February 1966. In contrast to the monumental downtown post office buildings constructed before World War II, the “Thousands Series” post offices, like the Scappoose building, were relatively small, modern in appearance, and featured a 24-hour lobby including postal boxes, will call counter, and a retail space. Typically, these buildings were located outside downtown to accommodate plenty of customer parking and allow mail trucks to maneuver. The Scappoose Post Office embodies all of these design principals and is an excellent, intact example of the type. Thousand Series post offices were designed to be part of an efficient mail-processing network that relied on automation and truck transportation to efficiently process mail locally and then deliver it to destinations across the nation.

--> Download the US Post Office nomination [pdf]

--> Download the US Post Office Facilities in Oregon, 1940-1971 Multiple Property Document [pdf]
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Alco Apartments, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed January 17, 2017

Built in 1912 at the north end of Portland’s central east side, the Alco Apartments opened at a time when east Portland was rapidly urbanizing, with competing commercial and residential uses vying for available space. Of key importance to these developments was proximity to streetcar lines connecting residential neighborhoods and suburban communities with the east side business district and downtown Portland. As a response to these competing needs, a new type of mixed-use building emerged in Portland in the closing decades of the nineteenth century and during the early twentieth century, combining storefronts at street level with apartments above, meeting the needs of both sectors. As development of new buildings in the central east side progressed during 1912, the Alco Apartments was featured in an ongoing series in The Sunday Oregonian, following their construction and highlighting their modern amenities and fine design. Strategically located on the streetcar line that traveled along Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. (then Union Avenue), the Alco was completed just before the rapid expansion of the automobile in the city, which would ultimately replace the streetcar as the dominant transportation mode until the late 20th century reintroduction and expansion of mass rail transit

--> Download the Alco Apartments nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Camp White Station Hospital Administration Building, Jackson County, White City
Listed December 20, 2016

The Camp White Station Hospital Administration Building (Building 200) was constructed in 1942 to house hospital administration uses associated with the development of US Army Camp George A. White in White City, Jackson County, in southern Oregon.  White City is an unincorporated community developed on the site of this former US Army training cantonment in the years following the Camp’s decommissioning at the end of World War II.  The building was converted to the administration building for the Camp White Domiciliary in 1949.  Today it still serves an administrative function associated with the 145-acre Department of Veterans Affairs Southern Oregon Rehabilitation Center & Clinics (SORCC) campus.  The two-story, brick-clad, Colonial Revival  building was designed by noted California architect Myron Hunt based on Army Corps of Engineers plans dated November 1941.

--> Download the Camp White Station Hospital Administration Building nomination [pdf]

-->  View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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