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Properties Recently Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Full text nominations for Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the last six months can be found below. If a property is not listed below, please contact Tracy Zeller at (503) 986-0690 or Tracy.Zeller@oregon.gov for an electronic or paper copy. 
 
A complete list of inventoried and National Register-listed properties is available online through the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

Antelope School, Wasco County, Antelope, Listed June 7, 2016
The Antelope School is a significant representative of rural education in central Oregon during the first half of the twentieth century. A testament to the continued commitment to education of the residents of the town and vicinity, since its completion in 1925 it has been by far the most substantial building in Antelope, occupying the most prominent parcel in town, filling a wide variety of community roles. The school is the third built in Antelope, and was the central focus of education in the surrounding area for 60 years. The Antelope School stands out among other rural schools of its period because of its size and breadth of education offered (including primary through secondary until 1936), designed to meet the state requirements for Standard Schools at all grade levels through that time. Although after 1936 the Antelope School no longer provided instruction for all grade levels, it continued to provide instruction at the elementary and intermediate levels until 1983, when it was closed as a public school, an event that is associated with the Rajneesh movement’s establishment of political dominance of the town. From its construction in 1925 to the present, the school has been a focus of community activity, hosting school activities, community events, and locally produced plays. The school has also functioned as the local polling place and the seat of local government, concurrent with and subsequent to its role as a place of formal education. The Antelope School is also locally significant for its architecture as a unique example of a formal, concrete Classical Revival-style school building in this extremely rural setting where one and two-room, wooden schoolhouses are far more typical.
 
--> Download the Antelope School nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Charles Hunter Hamlin House, Multnomah County, Gresham, Listed June 7, 2016

The Hamlin-Johnson House, located at the corner of SE Lusted Road and SE 282nd Avenue outside of Gresham, was constructed circa 1888. The house is associated with early steamboat engineer Charles Hamlin and later with the Reverend Jonas Johnson and his family, who owned the house for six decades. Johnson was a pastor at the Swedish Powell Valley Church. Today the house represents an increasingly rare, rural residential property from this era of development in Gresham.

 

 

-->Download the Charles Hunter Hamlin House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

 

W. Leland James House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed May 23, 2016
The 1929 W. Leland James House, designed by Portland architect Harold Doty in the English Arts & Crafts style, was commissioned by businessman W. Leland James. James founded Consolidated Freightways, a nationwide trucking firm that eventually became Con-Way, and Freightliner, a manufacturer of semi-trucks. James is credited with developing and implementing the concept of long-haul trucking, at a time when railroads still dominated the shipping industry. He had the house, which sits prominently on its site in the Terwilliger neighborhood, designed and built during a high point in his career. It was later occupied by William Gruber, the inventor of the View-Master.  Architect Harold Doty was a long-time collaborator with Wade Pipes. Although not as well-known as some of his contemporaries, his work was nonetheless published in the national architectural journal Architectural Record, and an exhibit and lecture on his work was held at the Portland Art Museum after his death in 1943. The W. Leland James House was noted in Classic Houses of Portland, Oregon as Doty’s “finest work.”
 
--> Download the W. Leland James House nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Fairview City Jail, Multnomah County, Fairview, Listed May 23, 2016
The Fairview City Jail was constructed in 1915. It never really served as a jail, but was considered necessary after Fairview adopted a series of anti-crime and anti-vice measures after its incorporation in 1908. It was constructed as an annex to the 1912 City Hall, which functioned as a City Hall, general store, library, post office, dance floor and theater. After the City Hall was demolished in 1979, the jail was a freestanding building in city park. Today the simple concrete building functions as a museum. It is the last original correctional facility remaining in Multnomah County.

--> Download the Fairview City Jail nomination [pdf]

-->  View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Arleta Branch Library, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 15, 2016
Constructed in 1918 using Carnegie Corporation grant funds, the brick Colonial Revival-style Arleta Branch Library, more recently known as the Wikman Building, was designed by well-known Portland architect Folger Johnson. The Arleta Branch Library is one of thirty-one Carnegie libraries built in Oregon, and one of seven built in the Portland area during the 1910s and early 1920s. Its Colonial Revival style is typical of this period of architecture in general, as well as reflective of Carnegie Corporation guidelines for library design. The Arleta Branch Library was the sixth Carnegie library to be constructed as part of the Library Association of Portland’s (now Multnomah County’s) branch library system and served its surrounding community through 1971 when city library services were centralized.

 

--> Download the Arleta Branch Library nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Pilot Butte Canal Historic District, Deschutes County, Bend, Listed February 8, 2016
The construction of the Pilot Butte Canal was a result of the vision of east-coast real-estate investor Alexander McClurg Drake. Drake sought to irrigate the lands surrounding the Deschutes River under the provisions of the federal Carey Desert Lands Act, which encouraged the establishment of irrigated farms in the arid West. Construction on the canal began in 1903. The critical Cooley Road to Yeoman Road Segment connected the already-constructed flume from the Deschutes River and traversed the basalt bedrock on its way north. However, the section was particularly difficult due to the terrain, and resources were concentrated here. Laborers using horse-drawn Fresno Scrapers and steam-powered drills finished this portion of the canal on February 10, 1905. The canal’s completion spurred rapid growth and development of central Oregon, including the establishment of Bend, Redmond, and other communities. It also provided an economic boost to the entire state with the growth of the agriculture and timber industries. The basalt floor and sides of the Cooley Road – Yeoman Road Segment of the Pilot Butte Canal still show the tooling marks left by the scrapers and the steam drills, and its rough, unfinished nature reflects both the difficulty in digging the canal and the importance of finishing the project quickly. The National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 listed the Pilot Butte Canal segment in the National Register after an extensive public process beginning in December 2014. The review process included comments from the Central Oregon Irrigation Company, residents, advocacy groups, and local, state, and federal agencies. NPS’ decision is based only on the National Register criteria, which considers the degree to which the property retains its historic appearance and its historic importance.

 
--> Download the Pilot Butte Canal Historic District nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Henry & Mary Cyrus Barn, Linn County, Lebanon, Listed November 9, 2015

The 1884 Henry and Mary Cyrus Barn is an increasingly rare example of a late-nineteenth century timber-frame barn in Linn County. The Cyrus family benefited the arrival and expansion of the railroad in the 1870s and 1880s, which created a local economic boom as farmers exported ever more wheat to national markets and imported needed equipment and building materials. For its time, the Cyrus Barn incorporated all the most modern features, including a mechanical hayfork, expansive hayloft, and steel-track roller doors. The barn was constructed using traditional mortise-and-tenon joinery (wood pegs) for the wood frame, while still incorporating newly available materials, including circular-sawn boards from local mills, machine-cut nails, and metal hardware. Notably, the interior, including the original grain bins and wood milking stanchions, remains largely intact. In the 1930s Swiss immigrant Franz (Frank) Schuler and his wife Eliza added two wood stave silos to the barn to store winter silage for dairy cattle. The silos are thought to be one of the last remaining examples of this type remaining in the County.

--> Download the Henry & Mary Cyrus Barn nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Washington High School, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed November 9, 2015
Washington High School is located in Southeast Portland, within Portland’s Buckman neighborhood. The four-story, Classical Revival school was designed by the Portland architecture firm of Houghtaling & Dougan and constructed in 1923-24. The school is significant for the role it played in the development of the city’s eastside communities. It was designed to respond to Portland’s need for expanded school facilities; growing concerns around health and safety (with a particular focus on fire prevention); and school designs that offered optimal learning environments as espoused by education experts at the time. The concrete school, which is faced with red brick and finished with terracotta moldings and details, was designed specifically for increased fire protection, as the previous school on the site burned in 1922. Decorative details can be found across the building’s exterior, including bas relief panels, engaged brick pilasters, lions heads, caryatid heads, and inspirational quotes. The progressive school provided technical training and included science laboratories and a 830-seat auditorium, in addition to classrooms.  The building ceased functioning as a high school in 1981, but was used for social services by Portland Public Schools until they sold the building in 2013. It has now been rehabilitated and re-opened as a commercial and retail space and performance venue.
 
 
--> Download the Washington High School nominatinon [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Jefferson County Courthouse, Jefferson County, Madras, Listed September 17, 2015

Following a contentious battle for the county seat, the 1917 Jefferson County Courthouse, known to locals as “the Old Courthouse,” was constructed as the Madras City Hall, but housed the county offices and court from 1917 until 1961 when the current courthouse was built a block away. The small concrete Jailhouse remained the only facility for holding prisoners during the same time. The Courthouse was constructed during a period of relative prosperity in Jefferson County and Madras specifically, which had grown steadily since the early-twentieth century with the establishment of dry-land farms throughout the area under the Homestead Act. Winning the county seat secured Madras’ position as the county’s economic and political center, encouraging further growth and development. In 1934, the United States Resettlement Administration, a Depression-era aid program, began buying failed farms throughout the county signaling an important shift in governance as the once profitable agricultural land surrounding Madras transferred from private ownership subject to county governance to pubic grazing lands under federal stewardship.

 --> Download the Jefferson County Courthouse nomination [pdf]

 --> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Andrew Jackson & Sara Jane Masters House, Washignton County, Aloha,

Listed September 17, 2015

The 1854 Masters House is located east of Hillsboro and west of the community of Aloha. The house is as an excellent example of a Classical Revival dwelling constructed during Oregon’s settlement period by overland emigrants. The timber frame house illustrates common earlier building construction techniques, with hewn structural members, rough sawn utility lumber, and planed finish materials. The house is also notable as the long-time residence of Sarah Jane Masters, who settled there with her first husband on their 638-acre land claim. Sarah’s husband died as the result of an altercation with neighbor James McMillen only two years after completion of the house. Mary Jane was to marry again twice, bear eight children, and live in the house until her death in 1896.
The City of Hillsboro currently owns the structure, which was the subject of the University of Oregon’s Pacific Northwest Preservation Field School this last summer. This is the second house owned by the City of Hillsboro that has been recently listed in the National Register. The first was the 1912 Malcolm McDonald House, listed in January 2015.

--> Download the Andrew Jackson & Sara Jane Masters House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Otto & Verdell Rutherford House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed August 5, 2015
The Otto and Verdell Rutherford House, a modest bungalow that served as a family home and support center for civil rights causes for more than half a century, is believed to be the first historic property in Oregon listed primarily for its association with the Civil Rights Movement. It was home to three generations of the Rutherford family, each of which was active in civil rights in Portland. William Rutherford and his brother Henry moved to Portland from Columbia, South Carolina in 1897 to work as barbers in the prestigious Portland Hotel. In 1923 William moved into the 1905 house on Shaver Street in the King neighborhood of Albina. Here William and his wife Lottie raised their four children, including their third son Otto, instilling in them a love of community and respect for education and hard work. Otto and Verdell moved back into the family home upon their marriage in 1936 and began their life of activism. A high point in their careers occurred in 1953, when Oregon’s Public Accommodations Act, under the sponsorship of then Representative Mark O. Hatfield, was passed. This landmark legislation occurred when Otto Rutherford was president of the Portland Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Verdell was secretary, positions they held for several years. The Rutherford house, where Otto and Verdell raised their three children, was the location of much organizing for civil rights in the 1940s and 1950s, as well as being the first home of the NAACP Credit Union. In later years, the Rutherfords worked arduously to document the history of the African American community in Portland. This collection, donated by daughter Charlotte Rutherford, is now housed in Portland State University’s Special Collections & University Archives. The Rutherfords also participated as community historians in the Bosco-Milligan Foundation’s inventory of African American properties in Portland in the late 1990s. Otto died in 2000 and Verdell followed shortly thereafter, in 2001. The house is still held by the family.
 
--> Download the Otto & Verdell Rutherford House nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District, Lane County, Leaburg vicinity,

Listed June 29, 2015

The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project was put into service in January 1930 and continues to generate electric power as part of the Eugene Water & Electric Board system, a municipally owned utility located in Lane County, Oregon. It is located along approximately five miles of the McKenzie River in the vicinity of Leaburg, and consists of the dam and powerhouse; the reservoir, canal and tailrace; and Leaburg Village, built to house dam workers. The Leaburg Hydroelectric Project was constructed between 1928 and 1930 and completed as originally envisioned in June 1950. Designed by the Portland engineering firm of Stevens & Koon, the facility is significant for its engineering design, incorporating innovative technological features such as the Broome Self-Closing Sluice Gate and three 100'-long roller gates. It is also significant for its art and architecture. The powerhouse was designed by Ellis Lawrence, the founder of the University of Oregon school of architecture. The bas relief panels on the building were created by the nationally prominent sculptor Harry Camden Poole. The powerhouse is considered one of the finest examples of Art Deco architecture used in an industrial setting in Oregon.

--> Download the Leaburg Hydroelectric Project Historic District nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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First National Bank of Bandon, Coos County, Bandon, Listed June 24, 2015

The temple-front First National Bank of Bandon was designed by Bror Benjamin Ostlind, a well-known and prominent architect from Marshfield, Oregon, present-day Coos Bay. Ostlind was born in Karlstad, Sweden in 1885, and moved to Marshfield in 1906. He was an active community member and a successful businessman, owning several enterprises in the community. In the bank building’s design, Ostlind combined the use of a relatively new and structurally robust material, concrete with “cold twisted rod” reinforcement. The and the Neoclassical style of the building resulted in an attractive and functional commercial bank building that conveyed the stability of the institution to the community, while providing a secure and fire-resistant location for the bank. The design was successful, and the building survived the Great Fire of 1936 that razed downtown Bandon. The building is recognized as the embodiment of the distinctive characteristics of its type, period, and method of its construction.

--> Download the First National Bank of Bandon nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Madras Army Air Field North Hangar, Jefferson County, Madras, Listed June 8, 2015
In 1943, the U.S. Army transformed the wheat fields northeast of Madras into a fully-functioning air field to train B-17 bombardment squadrons as part of a nation-wide effort to build the nation’s air force during World War II. The Boeing B-17 was known as the “Flying Fortress” due to its immense size and ability to sustain heavy damage during combat - a reputation earned in the skies over Europe. The Madras location met the Army’s requirements for a secure site with year-round clear weather ideal for training new crews. The airfield was one of several training bases in the region. The Army quickly constructed the base’s 96 buildings, including officer quarters, squadron barracks and associated living areas, station base buildings, two 120-foot-by-80-foot hangars, and other special-purpose buildings. The surviving hangar is one of the few remaining base buildings and is a rare intact example of the standard OBH-2 type hangar. The type is notable for its all-wood construction and bowstring roof truss system. Ground crews used the hangar to service B-17 bombers, and while massive in size, the building is just large enough to accommodate a single plane. The hangar’s wood construction uses regionally-abundant and inexpensive materials to meet the Army’s demands for cost-effective and efficient construction. In 1944, the base’s operations shifted toward training for smaller fighter planes including the Bell P-39Q Airacobra, Bell P-63 Kingcobra and Lockheed P-38 Lightning. The base was closed at the end of the war in 1945. The newly-listed hangar will be a focal point for activities Aug. 28-29 at the Airshow of the Cascades. An air museum is located nearby.
 
--> Download the Madras Army Air Field North Hangar nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]