Text Size:   A+ A- A   •   Text Only
Find     
Site Image
Multnomah County History Books

Introduction

The following are books and studies written during the past 60 years that deal primarily with Multnomah County or communities in Multnomah County. If you have additional books to suggest, please complete this form.

This listing is merely to inform people of some of the available books and studies. It is not an endorsement of any or all of the publications.

 

Back to Top

A-C

Abbott, Carl. Portland: Gateway to the Northwest. Northridge, Calif.: Windsor Publications, Inc., 1985. Photographs, Selected Reading, Index. Pp. 270.

Publication provides a history of Portland since its founding through the 1970s, focusing on the city’s role in community and economic regional development.


Archer, Howard. Gresham . . . The Friendly City. Gresham: Outlook Publishing Co., 1967. Photographs, Index. Pp. 152.

This book covers from Euro-American settlement during the mid-19th century through the 1960s.  The publication is arranged in roughly chronological and thematic order, with emphasis on brief individual or family histories, events, and institutions.  Much of the information was collected from oral histories and secondary sources.


Barker, Neil Louis. “The Works Progress Administration in Portland, Oregon: A Historical Narrative and Survey Report, 1935-1942.” Pullman: Washington State University, 1996. Bibliography. Pp. 150.

This master’s thesis summarizes the origins and intent of the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression and its role in Portland. It examines the various projects completed and the political conflict that arose over the program.


Bosco-Milligan Foundation. “Cornerstones of Community: Buildings of African American History.” Portland: Architectural Heritage Center, 1995. Appendices, Maps, Tables. p. 155.

This document identifies 289 buildings of significance to the African American community of Portland. It examines Portland’s history and social organization such as the NAACP, churches, and community development. It lists associated buildings alphabetically by owner.


Bosco-Milligan Foundation. “Cornerstones of Community: Buildings of Portland’s African American History.” Portland: Architectural Heritage Center, 1997. Maps, Photographs, Tables. Pp. 379.

This document expands the 1995 study and identifies 1,284 buildings of significance to the African American community. It examines Portland’s history and social organization such as the NAACP, churches, and community development. It lists buildings alphabetically by owner.


Chilton, W.R., ed. Gresham: Stories of Our Past: Campground to City. Gresham: Davis and Fox Printing, Inc., 1993. Illustrations, Maps, Tables, Photographs, Bibliography, Index. Pp. 344.

This is the first of two publications about Gresham written by senior students at Mt. Hood Community College.  The book follows a roughly chronological and thematic order until 1960.  Most information was collected through oral histories of long-time residents by students, and also from secondary sources and some other primary sources.


Chilton, W.R. Gresham: Stories of Our Past: Book II: Before and After the World Wars. Gresham: Davis and Fox Printing, Inc., 1996. Illustrations, Maps, Tables, Photographs, Corrections for Book I, Index. Pp. 348.

This is the second publication in the series, and is arranged like the first book.  This second book ends during the 1990s, with an exploration of the city’s urban growth boundary and decreasing farm land.  It focuses on the influence of World War I, the Great Depression, World War II and the post-war period.

Back to Top

D-J

DeMarco, Gordon. A Short History of Portland. San Francisco: Lexikos, 1990. Photographs, Illustrations, Index, Bibliography. Pp.  vii, 159.

Publication covers the history of Portland through the 1970s and 1980s with a focus on political and economic history.  All information was compiled from secondary sources.


Dodd, Douglas W. and Peter J. Edwards. “Fairview Cultural Resource Inventory and Historic Context.” Fairview: Columbia Historical Research, 1992. Figures, Maps, Tables, Photographs, Bibliography. Pp. 56.

This provides context for the history of the Fairview area and includes an inventory of 120 cultural resources, a list of recommended properties for protection under the City of Fairview’s preservation ordinance, and recommendations for treatment.


Evans-Hatch, Gail E. H. and D. Michael. “The Development of Sellwood-Moreland.” Silverton: Evans-Hatch and Associates, 1999. Maps, Photographs, Tables, Footnotes, Appendices, Bibliography. Pp. 131.

This publication includes a historic thematic review and timeline; potential resources, evaluation criteria, and ordinances; and lists prominent people and city council officers..


Fisher, Lorena S. The Bonneville Dream. N.p., 1991. Illustrations, Maps, Photographs, Bibliography, Index of Names. Pp. 146.

The Bonneville Dream examines the history of the Bonneville Dam project during the 1930s and 1940s, with special emphasis on the people who worked on the project.  Information for the publication was compiled mostly from secondary sources.


Heritage Investment Corporation. “Bridal Veil, Multnomah County, Oregon: Historical and Architectural Evaluation.” Portland: Heritage Investment Corporation, 1992. Color Photographs, Bibliography. Pp. 115.

This provides a history of Bridal Veil, including a timeline of significant events. It features building descriptions, legal property descriptions, a contextual evaluation of Bridal Veil as a company town, existing inventories of historic resources, and description of interpretive opportunities for the area.


Hueur, Jim and Roy Roos. “The Emil Schacht Houses in Willamette Heights: The Cradle of Arts and Crafts Architecture in Portland.” Draft 2g. Portland: House History Research, 2002. Photographs, Appendices. Pp. 37.

This document explores how Schacht gained his reputation as an architect at the Lewis and Clark Exposition and the themes of his work. It describes Schacht’s houses and his influence upon other architects.


Johnson, Steven Reed.  “A Brief History of Civic Space in Portland Oregon since World War II.” Portland: Steven Reed Johnson, October 28, 2009. Portland Area Websites.  Pp. 25.

This document explores the history of public spaces of Portland frequented by younger generations such as clubs, coffee shops and parks, and how these public spaces can be used to control youth and the evolution of this tactic. It encourages neighborhood activities and provides website addresses for connectivity.

 

Back to Top

K-O

Koler/Morrison Planning Consultants. “Multnomah County, Oregon Historic Context
Statement.”
Oregon City: Division of Planning and Development, 1990. Maps, Figures, Appendices, Bibliography. Pp. 96.

This history traces Portland’s social trends and urban development of the 20th century. It includes a resource inventory, and lists preservation goals and significant persons.


Kramer, Linda. Celebrating Portland. Northridge, Calif.: Windsor Publications, Inc., 1988. Photographs, Bibliography, Index. Pp. 328.

Primarily celebratory in nature, this publication provides a brief section on Portland’s history, waterfront, economic, industrial, and manufacturing development, business history, education, employment, and the greater Portland area.  Most information was collected from secondary sources.


Northwest District Association. “Northwest Portland Historic Inventory.” Portland: Northwest District Association, August 1991. Appendices, Maps, Tables, Appendices. Pp. 131.

This is a history of Northwest Portland that evaluates cultural resources and suggests protection strategies. There is a list of prominent citizens and contributing resources within the district. Resources are organized by architectural style, construction date, property type, architect, and significance. See also “Northwest Portland Historic Inventory Phase II.”


Northwest District Association. “Northwest Portland Historic Inventory Phase II.” Salem:
Oregon State Parks, August 1992. Appendices, Maps, Tables. Pp. 55.

This publication continues the collection of properties listed in “Northwest Portland Historic Inventory” (see above), by contributing status, construction date, architectural style, rank, excluded properties and maps.


O’Donnell, Terence and Thomas Vaughan. Portland: A Historical Sketch and Guide. Portland: Oregon Historical Society, 1976. Maps, Photographs, Illustrations, Footnotes, Index. Pp. 161.

O’Donnell, Terence and Thomas Vaughan. Portland: An Informal History and Guide. Portland: Oregon Historical Society, 1984. Maps, Photographs, Illustrations, Footnotes, Index. Pp. 212

This publication provides a brief history of the development of Portland from 1845 through the 1960s from information collected through primary and secondary sources.  Also included is a city guide section with nine different tours.  Portland: An Informal History and Guide is the second edition of Portland: A Historical Sketch and Guide.

 

Back to Top

P

Pinyerd, David, Bernadette Niederer, Patience Stuart, Hope Svenson, and Mike Gushard. “Modern Historic Resources of East Portland: A Reconnaissance Survey.” Portland: Historic Preservation Northwest, 2011. Bibliography, Color Photographs, Maps, House Plans, Graphs. Pp. 164.

This publication presents a survey for selected groups of East Portland properties constructed between 1935 and 1965. It covers structural style and form, and sources of design, and offers recommendations for National Register districts, potentially eligible houses and groups of houses. Surveyed areas include Century Terrace, View Ridge, Argay Terrace, Academy Heights and Borden Heights, Saites Park, Twin Cedars, Gateview Heights and Elsinore Heights, Woodland Park, Lorene Park, Whispering Firs (including Halsey Addition, Silvey Addition, Upton Acres, Evans Park, Donna Addition, Bevis Park, Waldheim Tracts and Swaggart Addition), Schilling and Muskopf Additions, Tally-Ho, Fairway Terrace, Glendoveer Park, Glenfair, Murmuring Pines, Tweten Park, Midtown Estates, Ascot Acres, Sierra Vista, Curtis Addition, Starkwood, Anderson Acres, Suellen Park, Asbahr Addition, Cherry Blossom Park, Parklane, Westena, Lillian, Reed Village and Neels Tract, Richardson Village, Sunset Gardens and Sno-Mor, Altadena Acreage and 72nd Street Addition, Foster Village, Buckley Park and Crystal View Acres.


Portland Chamber of Commerce. “General Survey: Columbia River Gateway Country.”  Portland: Portland Chamber of Commerce, 1920. Index, Tables, Illustrations, Maps. Pp. 44. 

This survey places the Portland region in a national context with summaries on national economic trends. It discusses the Pacific Northwest’s waterway system and traffic, Portland’s development, the lumber industry, commerce and agriculture, and shipbuilding.


Portland Development Commission.  “North Park Blocks Redevelopment Study.”  Portland: Portland Development Commission, June 1990. Photographs, Appendices Pp. 37.

This report evaluates the condition of the built environment, circulation and parking, and public improvements, including the park blocks.  The report also summarizes plans and policies affecting public improvements and development opportunities and makes recommendations consistent with these.  Under the section, “Future Development” it provides a list of North Park Blocks cultural resources. The 18-block area is bounded by Burnside on the south, 9th Avenue on the west, Hoyt Street on the north and Broadway on the east.


Portland Planning and Sustainability Bureau. “East Portland Historical Overview & Historic Preservation Study.” Portland: City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, March 2009. Revised. Photographs, Tables, Illustrations, Bibliography. Pp. 74.

This overview examines early settlement of the area of East Portland and community profiles. It details the expansion of suburbia and infrastructure, historic resources and preservation options.


Portland Planning and Sustainability Bureau. “East Portland Historical Overview & Historic Preservation Study Appendices.” Portland: City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, 2009. Revised. Maps, Photographs, Tables. Pp. 57.

The document contains maps, photos, historic timeline, land patents and land claims, East Portland annexations and data tables, and lists of properties in the historic resources inventory.


Portland Planning and Sustainability Bureau.
“Research Guides and Bibliographies.”

This website resource provides a list of research guides and bibliographical resources with links to PDF-formatted documents.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Draft Portland Historical Context Statement.” Portland: City of Portland Planning Bureau, 1993. Photos, Maps, Biblography. Pp. 141.

A concise review of Portland, this document contains a topographical outline, Native American history, a timeline of social themes, resource identification, evaluation criteria and treatment strategies.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Historic Context Hawthorne Boulevard from SE 20th to SE 55th Avenues.” Portland: City of Portland Bureau of Planning, 2003. Pp. 11.

Publication provides a brief summary of the development of the Hawthorne area through the streetcar era and motor age, and notes common resources.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Districts in the Albina Community.”  Portland: Bureau of Planning, February 1992. Photographs, Maps, Illustrations, Appendices Pp. 26.

This report reviews the 1984 historic resources inventory and has a plan for conducting additional survey work to identify the characteristics, conditions and distribution patterns of the buildings.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Historic Resource Inventory: Architect / Contractor Index.” Portland: City of Portland Planning Bureau, 1984.

This index serves as a finding aid for the 1984 historic resources, which identified 4,900 buildings as architecturally or historically significant. This document lists historic resources alphabetically by architect or contractor, and includes master file numbers, street addresses and location area.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Historic Resource Inventory: Architectural Style Index.” Portland: City of Portland Planning Bureau, 1984.

This index serves as a finding aid for the historic resources inventory conducted by the Portland Planning Bureau. This document lists historic resources alphabetically by architectural style, and includes master file numbers, street addresses and location area.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Historic Resource Inventory: Chronological Index.” Portland: City of Portland Planning Bureau, 1984.

This index serves as a finding aid for the historic resources. This document includes historic resources chronologically by date, and lists master file numbers, street addresses and location area.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory – City of Portland, Oregon: Selected Properties – Downtown.”  Portland: Bureau of Planning, May 1984.  Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography. Pp. 193.

One of 10 volumes, this publication presents the results of a city-wide inventory of significant historical and architectural properties. This volume covers the downtown area.



Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory – City of Portland, Oregon Selected Properties – Far Northeast Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, May 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography. Pp. 147.

One of 10 volumes, this publication presents the results of an inventory of significant historical and architectural properties in Portland.  This volume covers the Airport, Alameda, Concordia, East Columbia, Grant Park, Hollywood, Irvington, Madison, Rose City Park and Wilshire-Beaumont neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Historic Resource Inventory: Master File Number Checklist.” Portland: City of Portland Planning Bureau, 1984.

This index serves as a finding aid for the historic resources inventory conducted by the Portland Planning Bureau. This document includes historic resources alphabetically by street address and includes a master file number and location area.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Historic Resource Inventory: Original / Secondary Function Index.” Portland: City of Portland Planning Bureau, 1984.

This index serves as a finding aid for the 1984 inventory. This document lists resources alphabetically by original and secondary function, and includes master file numbers, street addresses and location area.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – Far Southeast Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography. Pp. 165.

This publication presents the results of the city-wide inventory for the Center, Montavilla, Mount Tabor, South Tabor, Foster-Powell, Mt. Scott-Arleta, Creston-Kenilworth, Reed, Eastmoreland, Woodstock and Lents neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – Far Southwest Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography.  Pp. 169.

This publication presents significant historical and architectural properties in the Arnold Creek, Ash Creek, Bridlemile-Robert Gray, Collins View, Corbett-Terwilliger-Lair Hill, Far Southwest, Hayhurst, Homestead, Jackson, Maplewood, Marshall Park, Multnomah, Riverview Abbey, South Burlingame, Southwest Hills Residential League, Terwilliger, Tryon-Alto Creek and Wilson Park neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – Mid-Southeast Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography.  Pp. 109.

One of 10 volumes, this publication presents the results of a city-wide inventory of significant historical and architectural properties.  This volume covers the Kerns, Laurelhurst, Sunnyside and Richmond neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – Near Northeast Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography.  Pp. 111.

This publication presents the results of a city-wide inventory of significant historical and architectural properties for the Piedmont, Woodlawn, Humboldt, King, Vernon, Boise, Sabin, Eliot, Lower Albina and Sullivan’s Gulch neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – Near Southeast Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984.  Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography.  Pp. 161.

One of ten volumes, this publication presents the results of a city-wide inventory of significant historical and architectural properties.  This volume covers the Buckman, Hosford-Abernethy, Brooklyn and Sellwood-Moreland neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – Near Southwest Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography.  Pp. 143.

Part of the city-wide inventory, this volume covers the Sylvan, Upper Highland, Arlington Heights, Westwood Hills, Washington Park, Goose Hollow, Southwest Hills (N) and Healy Heights neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – North Portland Citizens Committee Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography.  Pp. 185.

One of 10 volumes, this publication presents the results of a city-wide inventory of significant historical and architectural properties.  This volume covers the Linnton, St. Johns, University Park, Portsmouth, Kenton and Arbor Lodge neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau.  “Historic Resource Inventory Project: Selected Properties – Northwest Neighborhoods.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1984. Photographs, Appendices, Maps, Bibliography.  Pp. 141.

This publication presents the results of a city-wide inventory of significant historical and architectural properties in Portland.  This volume covers the Forest Park, NW Industrial, Northwest and Hillside neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Portland’s Albina Community: The History of Portland’s African American Community (1805 to the Present).” Portland: Portland Bureau of Planning, 1993. Maps, Tables, Photos and Bibliography. Pp. 166.

This document recounts the African American experience in the Albina neighborhood beginning with settlement and the origins of discriminatory and exclusionary laws. The narrative covers the struggle for education and jobs, the Civil Rights movement, housing discrimination, and legislative challenges. There is also a summary of urban planning efforts and revitalization plans for Albina.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Potential Historic Conservation Districts.” Portland: Portland Bureau of Planning, 1978. Photographs, Maps, Tables, Bibliography for each section. Pp. 201.

This document examines the establishment of the individual neighborhoods which make up Portland and a list of their significant resources, including Albina, Buckman, Chinatown, Corbett, East Portland, Irvington, Kenton, King’s Hill, Laurelhurst, Multnomah, Nob Hill, Piedmont, St. John’s, Sellwood, Sunnyside and Woodlawn neighborhoods.


Portland Planning Bureau. “Proposed Local Historic Districts: Albina Community Plan.” Portland: Bureau of Planning, 1992. Pp. 88.

This publication provides a list of potential historic districts in the Albina area for Eliot, Irvington, Kenton, Mississippi, Mock’s Crest, Piedmont, Russell Street and Woodlawn. It contains a description about the neighborhoods’ period of significance, a historical summary for each, consideration of potential resources and district maps.


Portland State University Department of Urban Studies and Planning.  “Historic Resources and the Albina Community Plan.” Portland: Portland State University Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 1990. Photographs, Maps, Bibliography, Glossary, Appendices. Pp. 55

This report reviews the issues and problems endemic to preservation of historically significant places and building in the Albina Community Plan study area.  The area conforms loosely to the boundaries of the original city of Albina located in inner North/Northeast Portland.



Portland State University, Department of Urban Studies and Planning. “History of the Albina Plan Area.” Portland:  Portland State University, 1990. Photos, Bibliography. Pp. 68.

This publication includes a narrative about the establishment of Albina through its incorporation into Portland. The study examines the different neighborhoods, ethnic divisions and industries.



Prohaska, Sharr. “History of the Development of Bridal Veil and the Bridal Veil Lumbering Company.” Bridal Veil: Cultural Heritage Tourism International, 1992. Photographs, Maps, Tables, Bibliography. Pp. 287.

This publication discusses the history of Bridal Veil, a mill town, and its lumber industry. It makes recommendations for the preservation of the town’s structures and includes a history of the Columbia River Scenic Highway, the towns that grew up alongside it, and biographies of significant local citizens.

Back to Top

Q-S

Snyder, Eugene E. Early Portland: Stump-Town Triumphant: Rival Towns on the Willamette, 1831-1854. Portland: Binford & Mort Publishers, 1970. Maps, Illustrations, Photographs, Notes, Index. Pp. 182.

Snyder’s book examines the early settlement of areas near the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers in the lower Willamette Valley during from the 1830s through 1850s, and ultimately how Portland’s location as a deep-water seaport beat out other early townsites.  This publication was written from primary and secondary sources.


Snyder, Eugene E. Portland Names and Neighborhoods: Their Historic Origins. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1979. Maps, Illustrations, Sources, Index. Pp. 256.

This publication focuses on how Portland streets received their names.  This history follows a chronological order, beginning with an investigation into street naming patterns of major east coast cities, and then showing how Portland’s naming patterns differed or incorporated these schemes.  Snyder focuses on such events as the Great Renaming of 1891, and identifies the development of subdivisions that make up the city’s current neighborhoods.  Also included is an alphabetical list of street names, school names, and park names.


Snyder, Eugene E. We Claimed this Land: Portland’s Pioneer Settlers. Portland: Binford & Mort Publishing, 1989. Photographs, Illustrations, Tables, Index. Pp. 289.

This book gives 212 biographies of early Euro-Americans of Portland.   Most of the information collected comes from primary sources.


Starin, Nicholas T. “History of Portland & Oregon: A Selected Bibliography.” Portland: Portland Bureau of Planning, 2008. Revised. Pp. 71.

This bibliography lists mostly secondary resources relating to the history of Portland, the Pacific Northwest, and local Native Americans. It is organized into books, articles and reference books.


Stone, William E. A History of Fairview. Oregon, 1970. Appendices, Photographs. Pp. 31.

Largely compiled from research undertaken by a Portland State University student and city records, this document discusses Fairview from the mid-19th century through the 1930s, with some references to the 1960s.  The information is presented in roughly chronological order, with topical appendices, including postmasters and early settlers.

Back to Top

T-Z

Zisman, Karen, Julie Koler, Jane Morrison, Barbara Grimala, and Allen Yost. “Portland’s
Eastside: Historic Context 1850-1938.”
Salem: Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, 1989. Revised. Appendices, Maps. Pp. 54.

This document examines the settlement and urban development of the East side and includes lists of prominent citizens, a resource inventory and treatment strategies for preservation, important properties and historic buildings.

 

Back to Top