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Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway


RideOregonRide.com/Tualatin
is a site just for cyclists hosted by Travel Oregon. It shows restaurants, hotels and bike shops along the route. You can post comments and read posts from other cyclists.

 

A poem about the bikeway!

Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway
By Allison George
 
Tualatin Valley, Twality Plains, hunting-gathering grounds of the Atfalati
Rusted gates and barbed wire, century farms with crumbling barns
Peachy pigs and clucking hens
A triceratops, her name is Breezy
Crimson clover
Honey, apples, blackberries, corn
Railroad trestles, lonesome train cars
Tractors, horses, wheat and hay
Quiet
Cow poop
Grinding coffee beans
Whispering Pioneer bones
Deep wing beats of the Great Blue Heron
Golden yellow double lines
Meandering Tualatin River
Ancient, roaring Ice Age floods
Cool Coast Range air
50.5
Wheels set us free
 
The Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway
The Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway captures the best of the northern Willamette Valley, from friendly downtowns to fertile farmlands and lush natural areas. The Bikeway runs point-to-point over 50 miles and includes the Banks-Vernonia State Trail.
 
 

 Grant's Getaways Tualatin

 

Mostly rural roads comprise 30 miles of the route, while the woodsy, off-road Banks-Vernonia State Trail accounts for 20 miles. Bikeway terrain ranges from plains to rolling hills, with the middle portion of the state trail featuring a climb of about 600 feet.

Riders can enjoy pleasing views of the Coast Range, farms, vineyards, natural areas near quaint downtowns, while the smell of fresh-cut hay or flutter of waterfowl engages other senses. The primary natural feature is the Tualatin River, which is dotted with wetlands and forest stands.
 
Farm produce stands, farmers’ markets and a winery along the route offer a wonderful seasonal mix of activities, enabling riders to easily partake in the area’s agricultural bounty. The valley’s mild weather makes the Bikeway a draw through most of the year; however, raingear is useful in winter.
 
The route’s northern and southern hubs are public parks, each with parking, restrooms and drinking water. Several other parks on the route offer picnic shelters and restrooms. Transit connections are available in Hillsboro, Forest Grove and Banks.
 

 

Maps

Southern Section
 
Northern Section
(Banks Vernonia Trail)
 

Cue Sheet

Camping

 
 

Local Info