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Environmental Programs

Environmental Section Programs

One of the Marine Board's key priorities is protecting the environment.  For decades, the agency has funded pumpout and dump stations, floating restrooms, and awarded grant funding for land-side restrooms.  But there's more to the environment than protection from human waste.  There's protecting our waterways from aquatic invasive species, ensuring that marine fueling stations are discharging gasoline properly, and advocating that boaters invest in clean, 2 and 4-stroke motors.  The agency also has a certified Clean Marina program, where certified marinas implement best management practices that include recycling programs, oil spill mitigation, planting native plants and having their facilities equipped with swales to filter storm water runoff, among other practices.  Image of a quagga mussel

Aquatic Invasive Species

Conservation is the #1 goal of the Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program being co-managed by the Oregon State Marine Board and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
 
Passed by the 2009 Oregon Legislature, this program funds the single largest invasive species prevention effort implemented within Oregon to date.  The program is funded by boaters to improve and implement outreach, education and enforcement efforts to boaters in the areas that are most threatened by aquatic invasive species. 
 
By preventing the spread of invasive species, we are protecting Oregon's waterways from the most significant environmental threat of our time.  Invaders out-compete native species and ultimately remove necessary nutrients from the water column that fish and other native organisms need to survive.  Think of all that's debated about restoring salmon. Imagine another roadblock to salmon survival and the cost this has on the restoration effort. 

Clean Marina  Clean marina logo

The Oregon Clean Marina program is a voluntary recognition program for marinas, boatyards, yacht clubs, and floating home moorages that adopt best management practices that improve water quality and promote a cleaner marine environment for Oregon.

Clean BoaterClean boater logo

Become an Oregon Clean Boater and receive your free tote bag filled with environmental information, an oil absorbent pillow and more! All you have to do is sign the program pledge and complete a short questionnaire.

Clear Gasoline Gasoline pump on top of a heap of corn

Ethanol blended gasoline is not a good blend for boats.  Marine machinery -or anything exposed to water, will absorb ethanol and it will degrade any rubber hoses or fittings.  This is why the Marine Board recommends using clear gasoline whenever possible. Additionally, blended fuel will separate after time, so for boats that are stored in the winter time, fuel separation can destroy your motor.  Always add fuel stabilizer and keep the tank mostly full during times where the boat isn't in use. 

Pumpout/Dump StationsPumpout/dump station symbol

Pumpout and dump stations are places that remove human waste from boats.  Dump stations are ideal for boaters who use a port-a-potty or other container for their waste.  These stations were funded by boaters.  Please use them, as well as floating restrooms to keep sewage out of our waterways.  Human waste is gross, it’s harmful to fish, contributes to harmful algae blooms, and smells bad.

Abandoned/Derelict Vessel Program

Marinas and even the shoreline have a few of them.  Abandoned and derelict boats wind up costing boaters when they are improperly disposed of, sold on the cheap to people who cannot maintain them, and many other reasons.  The Marine Board has $150,000 a biennium to help remove recreational abandoned/derelict boats that may be a hazard to navigation.  The agency is also developing a vessel-turn-in program for marinas and Ports by hiring a contractor to remove several boats at one time. 

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