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2010 Grant Program Update
2010 Grant Program Index
Ashland Right Water Right Use Planning Study -GC0010 09

Baker County: Powder Basin Water Stream Health Committee - GA0014 09

Baker Valley SWCD / Smith Ditch District Improvement Co. - GC0009 09

Central Oregon Irrigation District - GC0003 09

City of Bend - GC0004 09

City of Corvallis - GR0022 09

City of Cottage Grove - GR0001 09

City of Dallas - GC0008 09

City of Damascus - GR0031 09

City of Hillsboro / City of Beaverton - GC0020 09

City of Rockaway Beach - GA0026 09

City of Port Orford - GA0036 09

City of Veneta - GC0002 09

County of Polk - GA0032 09

Deschutes River Conservancy / North Unit Irrigation District - GC0025 09

Eagle Point Irrigation District / Medford Water Commission - GA0028 09

East Valley Water District - GA0035 09

Grande Ronde Model Watershed - GB0015 09

Mosier Watershed Council - GB0016 09

Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust - GC0013 09

Tigard Area Water Reuse Study - GR0021 09

Water for Irrigation, Streams and Economy (WISE) Project - GC0012 09

Ashland Right Water Right Use Planning Study - GC0010 09
Awarded to Ashland Right Water Right Use Planning Study
Description

The City of Ashland has two fundamental water challenges associated with long-term community sustainability: 1) Provide reliable and safe potable water for anticipated community growth; and 2) Improve the health of Ashland Creek and Bear Creek by increasing summer streamflows and lowering temperatures to improve fish habitat. Ashland’s study was a holistic approach to water use. The study defined the interrelationships between all of the available sources of water, including the use of irrigation water and recycled/reuse treated effluent, to offset irrigation demand within the City. Additionally the study, identified benefits and challenges of using irrigation water with the existing construct of providers and regulatory oversight.
Accomplishments - Complete
Potential Implementation Strategy
Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plans and Registration of reclaimed water


Baker County: Powder Basin Water & Stream Health Committee - GA0014 09
Awarded to Baker County: Powder Basin Water & Stream Health Committee
Description
WASH, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, examined the feasibility several storage sites. The feasibility study identified alternatives, collected missing data, and developed engineering solutions. Studies needed to support the development of alternatives including: hydrology, water rights, hydraulics, geotechnical investigations, engineering, and design analysis. The alternatives went through an evaluation and assessment process.

Accomplishments - Complete

The evaluation included technical development and cost estimate, environmental impact and economic viability evaluation, and identification of political, legal and administrative issues.

Potential Implementation Strategy

The Bureau of Reclamation study was completed as well; none of the reservoir sites met the BOR feasibility criteria. The stakeholders and the WASH Committee do not agree that the findings of the Reclamation study are complete. They have requested that new calculations be performed that take into consideration optimizing hydropower generation, the sale of water instream, recreation income, and new cropping patterns. Reclamation has agreed and is in the process of revising and updating the draft Eastern Oregon Water Storage Appraisal Study. The next steps for the Ecologically Adaptive Water Management Project are to request Reclamation to assist with diversion mapping and additional hydrologic data collection efforts.

In order to catalyze the effort at this level of study FERC permits and water storage and water use permits will also need to be filed. Once those steps occur, a new level of coordination between affected agencies and stakeholders will need to take place. Additionally, filing with FERC puts the process on a timeline.


Related Department Activities
Department Staff will continue to work with all the parties.





Baker Valley SWCD / Smith Ditch District Improvement Co. - GC0009 09
Awarded to Baker Valley SWCD / Smith Ditch District Improvement Co.
Description
The Smith Ditch is an unlined 18-mile long irrigation ditch which diverts water supplied by the Powder River and Phillips Reservoir. The ditch serves 17 users and is used for irrigating 2,600 acres. The loss factor of the ditch is between 20 and 40 percent. A portion of the ditch is located in a live slide area with 600 feet of tunnel in close proximity to the neighborhoods of Baker City and two miles running through the city limits. The ditch is a possible danger to the residents in the area. The feasibility study determined the preferred alternative for eliminating the open ditch, conserving water, providing a more efficient irrigation water conveyance, and eliminating a safety hazard to residents.
Accomplishments - Complete

The feasibility study determined the preferred alternative for eliminating the open ditch, conserving water, providing a more efficient irrigation water conveyance, and eliminating a safety hazard to residents. (link to final report below)

Potential Implementation Strategy

The Department will continue to work with the Grantee and other partners such as the irrigation district, the City, BOR and conservation groups to assemble a funding package to implement the project.

Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation planning. Allocation of conserved Water & KBRA



Central Oregon Irrigation District - GC0003 09
Awarded to Central Oregon Irrigation District
Description
Central Oregon Irrigation District’s I-Lateral in Alfalfa, Oregon serves 1,712 acres. The feasibility study determined the cost effectiveness of piping or lining a 1.5 mile section of the I-Lateral. If the section is piped or lined, it is estimated that 4.50 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water could be conserved, of which at least 2.25 cfs could be permanently converted to instream water rights in the Deschutes River through the use of the allocation of Conserved Water Program.


Accomplishments
Much of the technical evaluation has been completed – COI is in the process of land owner involvement.

Potential Implementation Strategy

Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plan, Allocation of conserved Water



City of Bend - GC0004 09
Awarded to City of Bend
Description

In 2007, the City of Bend completed a Water System Master Plan Update that indicated that the City needed to expand supply, storage and pumping capacities to meet demands through 2030. The preliminary cost estimates for upgrading and modifying the existing surface water supply is $50 million.
Accomplishments - Completed

The alternatives analysis focused on the City’s Bridge Creek surface water supply. Key alternatives to be considered included; groundwater; moving Bend’s point of diversion downstream; and other alternatives that may leave more water instream to benefit fish and related resources. The study estimated costs of surface water system upgrades and developed a comparative economic analysis of other water supply alternatives. The evaluation also considered efficiency and conservation, resource benefits, hydroelectric power, water rights, water quality and treatment, outside funding, long-term costs, and factors such a disruptions to the public and ease of implementation.
Potential Implementation Strategy
The preferred alternative to meet the City’s long-term water supply needs while maximizing efficiency and conservation has been identified. However due to the magnitude of the project costs and the down turn in the economy, the City is deferring action at this time.


Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plans and Hydroelectric Licensing



City of Corvallis - GR0022 09
Awarded to City of Corvallis
Description

The City of Corvallis analyzed alternate discharge options for treated wastewater to comply with the Willamette River temperature Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). One of the alternatives may eliminate direct discharge to the river. The City has evaluated regulatory requirements and economic impacts of current and continued long-term discharge to the Willamette over the next 50 years. It also conducted a screening evaluation for alternate indirect river discharges. Because of this screening evaluation, three water reuse alternatives were identified as potential solutions to protect water quantity and quality in the future and to enhance community livability by providing a sustainable water resource. Water quantity needs that could be addressed by the associated project include: agricultural irrigation, urban irrigation, wetland restoration, wildlife habitat expansion, streamflow augmentation, and water conservation from the Willamette River and local streams.

Accomplishments - Complete
Because of this screening evaluation, three water reuse alternatives were identified as potential solutions to protect water quantity and quality in the future and to enhance community livability by providing a sustainable water resource. Water quantity needs that could be addressed by the associated project include: agricultural irrigation, urban irrigation, wetland restoration, wildlife habitat expansion, streamflow augmentation, and water conservation from the Willamette River and local streams.


Potential Implementation Strategy
Potential partnership with Greenberry Irrigation District, Oregon Infrastructure Authority, & DEQ

Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plan, Reclaimed Water Registration



City of Cottage Grove - GR0001 09
Awarded to City of Cottage Grove
Description
The City of Cottage Grove recently completed an $11 million upgrade to their wastewater treatment system. In an effort to further reduce water quality impacts of its wastewater treatment facility, the wastewater treatment facility has a design average dry-weather flow of 1.8 million gallons per day (MGD) while the design average wet-weather flow is 3.5 MGD. The treatment plant produces Class A reclaimed water. The reduced demand would be calculated as part of the feasibility study, but the maximum effluent available for irrigation during the summer months would be approximately 1.5 MGD.

Accomplishments - Completed
The City studied the feasibility of re-using a significant portion of its treated effluent from its wastewater treatment system for irrigation purposes. .

Potential Implementation Strategy
The treated effluent is currently released directly into the Coast Fork of the Willamette River. Potential users of the irrigation water would be Middlefield Golf Course, several City parks and the planned 14-acre Bohemia Park, which plans to include a significant water feature.


Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plans and Registration of reclaimed water




City of Dallas - GC0008 09
Awarded to City of Dallas
Description

The City of Dallas is currently pilot testing a single-well 0.33-million gallon per day (MGD) aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) system utilizing the saline Siletz River Volcanics as the receiving aquifer. During recharge of the ASR system, injected source water locally displaces saline groundwater in the aquifer. Early pilot testing results show that a fresh water storage zone can be developed in the Siletz River Volcanics, confirmed that potable water can be recovered from the system, and indicated recovery efficiency has increased over successive pilot testing cycles.




This feasibility study used existing data sets to develop and calibrate operational models of aquifer geometry and dual-density flow characteristics in the Siletz River Volcanics aquifer. These advanced numerical models will provide a technical basis for optimizing storage capacity and recovery efficiency from the City's existing ASR well and for decision making during expansion of the City's ASR program to meet their goal of a 1-MGD capacity ASR system. (link to final report below)

Potential Implementation Strategy
Potential partnership with Oregon Infrastructure Authority Drinking water program

Related Department Activities
ASR Data base Limited License and ASR permit applications are Updated information from OWSCI Grant


City of Damascus - GR0031 09
Awarded to City of Damascus
Description


The build-out population of newly formed City of Damascus is approximately 60,000 people, of which 20,000 might be expected to reside on the eastern side of Damascus. The eastern side is semi-rural and far from existing water and wastewater infrastructure, but prime for development as Damascus formulates their first Comprehensive Plan.


Accomplishments – Complete

The grant funded a study to analyze regional cooperative a wastewater/water reuse plan. The potential to provide 2 million gallons per day of reclaimed water and wastewater facilities for East Damascus while helping to meet a significant portion of the water supply needs for the surrounding communities.
Potential Implementation Strategy
Wastewater solutions for Southeast Damascus include upgrades of the existing Clackamas County treatment facility in Boring, production of reclaimed water, partnerships with Sunrise Water Authority, and distribution back into Damascus. Solutions for Northeast Damascus include partnerships with Gresham and Troutdale, and possible satellite water reclamation facilities. There is a potential partnership with Oregon Infrastructure Authority

Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plan, Reclaimed Water Registration & OWSCI Grant




City of Hillsboro / City of Beaverton - GC0020 09
Awarded to City of Hillsboro / City of Beaverton
Description
The City of Hillsboro has had a high efficiency washing machine rebate program in place for more than six years. The program has been highly successful and the washing machine market has been transformed in Hillsboro. The popularity of the rebate program and the need for financial and retrofit incentive programs provides an opportunity to develop different rebate programs that will better target water efficiency standards and should increase water savings and drop per capita consumption. Beaverton does not currently have a rebate program.
Accomplishments - Competed
The study evaluated the cost benefit analysis and feasibility of a Water Sense Rebate Program for the Cities of Hillsboro and Beaverton. The information gained from this study will help assist in program and policy revisions to a conservation rebate program to reduce the overall per capita demand on the water system. (link to final report below)
Potential Implementation Strategy
The information will be presented to the Hillsboro Utilities Commission and Beaverton City Council, and portions of the study may be implemented based on staff resources, budget availability and policy adoptions. Hillsboro and Beaverton would like to pioneer programs in partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Water Sense labeling program.
Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plans



City of Rockaway Beach - GA0026 09
Awarded to City of Rockaway Beach
Description

The City of Rockaway Beach diverts its water from Jetty Creek. The Jetty Creek point of diversion dam has several problems, including high runoff during storm events that causes spikes in raw water turbidity that increase the cost of water treatment; sedimentation requires frequent dredging; low summer streamflows create difficulty for the City in meeting its water demands, as well as maintaining the instream water rights; and the current diversion creates a fish passage barrier.

Accomplishments - Completed
The study outlined the feasibility of relocating the City’s existing instream raw water impoundment on Jetty Creek to a side channel location, which will improve fish passage. The City also plans to install a control device to ensure that the instream water right is met prior to diverting water for municipal needs. The study is needed to identify the engineering and financial feasibility of the associated project, as well as the potential environmental impacts. Key components of the study include: site evaluation; geotechnical investigation; hydrologic analysis; and a biological inventory.

Potential Implementation Strategy
These items will provide the foundational information that will be used to determine the overall engineering, financial, regulatory and environmental feasibility

Related Department Activities
Water Rights Transfers – Water Management and Conservation Plans and OWEB Region Review Teams.




City of Port Orford - GA0036 09
Awarded to City of Port Orford
Description
The Hubbard Creek Impoundment feasibility study evaluated raising the reservoir by 11 feet which would allow the City to impound an additional 52 acre-feet. The additional storage is necessary for the City to reliably meet water demands during the late summer and to prevent complete water supply shortfalls from occurring in the next five to ten years, and it would satisfy the City’s 50-year peak month demand of 237 gallons per day per household. This study will address the uncertainties associated with the expansion.

Accomplishments – Completed
The study produced an environmental assessment (including a wetlands assessment) and preliminary engineering report for the associated project. The feasibility of the associated project including identifying the scope and cost of the project and any additional mitigation measures required to address any environmental consequences or benefits resulting from the implementation of the project.
Potential Implementation Strategy
Several funding agencies could be involved, the state Infrastructure Authority and the USDA Rural Utilities Service would be the main potential partners.

Related Department Activities
Water Rights processing and Dam Safety



City of Veneta - GC0002 09
Awarded to City of Veneta
Description

The City of Veneta's water is supplied entirely from groundwater. Currently, the City's wells cannot produce enough water to meet peak seasonal demands. During the process of pumping goundwater, filters help to remove excess iron from the water. The City scrubs the filters daily by reversing the water flow through the filters and then disposing of that water and the accumulated unwanted material. This is called the "backwash" process. The City currently looses an average of 25,000 gallons per day during the backwash process. This is equal to 4.8% of total water use. During the backwash process the wells are shut down.

The engineering study assessed a range of options for conservation and use of the "backwash" water and safely disposing of the accumulated iron and other particles. Potential alternatives include the use of a membrane treatment to produce high quality drinking water from the original backwash water and produce a small volume of non-useable backwash water or a microfiltration cartridge to recover the backwash water.

Accomplishments Complete – ()
Potential Implementation Strategy
The engineering study assessed a range of options for conservation and use of the "backwash" water and safely disposing of the accumulated iron and other particles. Potential alternatives include the use of a membrane treatment to produce high quality drinking water from the original backwash water and produce a small volume of non-useable backwash water or a microfiltration cartridge to recover the backwash water.

Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plan, Reclaimed Water Registration & OWSCI Grant




County of Polk - GA0032 09
Awarded to Polk County
Description
Polk and Lincoln Counties are seeking to meet regional water needs through a collaborative effort to evaluate a storage reservoir in area of the former Valsetz community. This facility would meet water needs through 2050 for municipal water providers and agricultural users in both Lincoln and Polk counties. This storage site would be located near the coastal mountain divide. Impounded water would be diverted in both directions, serving Lincoln County on the west side through the Siletz River and Polk County on the east side through the Luckiamute River.

Accomplishments – Complete
In order to continue to pursue this opportunity, The planning study consisted of streamflow and environmental data collection for the Siletz and Luckiamute River watersheds, hydrologic, streamflow and water rights analyses, a baseline environmental impacts study and storage concept and alternatives analyses was needed.

Potential Implementation Strategy


Related Department Activities



Deschutes River Conservancy / North Unit Irrigation District - GC0025 09
Awarded to Deschutes River Conservancy / North Unit Irrigation District
Description
The Deschutes River Conservancy (DRC) and the North Unit Irrigation District (NUID) are partnering to produce a preliminary design for a water conservation project. The associated project will enhance irrigation conveyance efficiencies within NUID and improve instream flows in the Deschutes and Crooked Rivers. When completed, the project will produce up to 19,300 acre feet of new water supply to help meet existing agricultural and environmental water supply needs. It will enhance instream flows in 130 miles of river, including the upper Deschutes River in the winter and the middle Deschutes River and lower Crooked River during the summer.

Accomplishments – Complete
This proposal built on the feasibility study commissioned by the DRC and performed by HDR Engineering in 2006. The study evaluated the potential water conservation benefits of lining approximately 19 miles of NUID’s main canal. This study has moved this conservation project from the feasibility stage to a preliminary design and implementation stage comprised of pre-application work with the Department related to the Allocation of Conserved Water and instream water rights.



Potential Implementation Strategy
The design will provide the basis for the development of a financing and implementation plan.

Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plans, Allocation of Conserved Water & instream water rights transfers.

2008svrdrcGrants_OWRDOWRD_NUID_Amendment_C_Signed_062911

Eagle Point Irrigation District / Medford Water Commission - GA0028 09
Awarded to Eagle Point Irrigation District / Medford Water Commission
Description
Eagle Point Irrigation District (EPID) and the Medford Water Commission (MWC) are the primary water right holders in the Big Butte Creek watershed. EPID services approximately 8,000 acres of land through a water right on South Fork Big Butte Creek. MWC provides domestic water to over 130,000 people around Medford through a series of water rights on Big Butte Creek and the Rogue River. Willow Lake is used to balance the water needs of these two entities. Water is released from the lake when natural flows in South Fork Big Butte Creek are insufficient to meet water right requirements. Droughts, decreased rain and snow, and warmer weather patterns have challenged both water systems’ ability to meet customer’s water demands.

Accomplishments - Completed
The goal of this planning study was to determine the feasibility of the development of proactive strategies to manage the water in Big Butte Creek. 1) A feasibility study to increase the storage capacity of Willow Lake by 300 to 1,700 acre-feet (the associated project represents less than 5 percent of EPID and MWC’s needs, but Willow Lake only receives 2,800 acre-feet of refill water, so the associated project would represent 10 to 50 percent of the water supply needed during droughts); 2) Developed a basin model to forecast demands and test different water management strategies; 3) Analyzed the ecological impact of flow withdrawal, alternative means of supply, and environmental impacts, and develop stream flow and water temperature goals for early fall Spring Chinook spawning season in Big Butte Creek.
Potential Implementation Strategy
Potential partners include such as NFWF, Fresh Water Trust, Bureau Of Reclamation and the Tribes.
Related Department Activities
Water Rights Transfers – Water Management and Conservation Plans and OWEB Region Review Teams


East Valley Water District - GA0035 09
Awarded to East Valley Water District
Description
The East Valley Water District needs a source of stable water supply for 15,000 acres of agricultural development. The study provided further assessment of an on-channel reservoir in the upper Pudding watershed on Drift Creek. The proposed reservoir would impound at least 12,000 acre-feet of water and will relieve pressure in the three limited groundwater areas in the District’s service area. The associated project will also relieve over-appropriated surface water sources. The estimated costs and conditions for developing the reservoir were developed. Tasks performed included: determining a wetland mitigation plan; analyze water delivery methods; determine fish passage mitigation requirements; comprehensive water quality analysis; cultural historical analysis, instream flow analysis and water right evaluation; fish habitat surveys; geotechnical investigations; defining critical path analysis for remaining tasks; identifying local permitting procedures; and providing engineering analysis of construction costs.

Accomplishments - Complete

Tasks performed included: determining a wetland mitigation plan; analyze water delivery methods; determine fish passage mitigation requirements; comprehensive water quality analysis; cultural historical analysis, instream flow analysis and water right evaluation; fish habitat surveys; geotechnical investigations; defining critical path analysis for remaining tasks; identifying local permitting procedures; and providing engineering analysis of construction costs.

Potential Implementation Strategy
Permitting - The next major effort will be filing of permit applications, this involves a series of permits to be completed and submitted to federal, state and local agencies.

Field Studies and Implementation - Additional field studies and reconnaissance are required to move from feasibility into finalizing permits and future implementation actions toward project completion.
Consultation - The District will continue consultation, District staff and consultations will continue throughout the permitting process with the agencies authorizing the required permits.
Finance – continue to pursue finance options for ultimate development.
Communication - Throughout the process of developing past and current studies, the District has communicated with affected landowners as the project progresses; the District will continue communication.

Related Department Activities
Water Rights Permit application, Dam Safety and Grant Application Programs






Grande Ronde Model Watershed - GB0015 09
Awarded to Grande Ronde Model Watershed
Description
The planning study evaluated the potential applications of managed underground storage techniques in Bear Creek, Lostine River, upper Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River watersheds. The goals were determine feasible ways to augment late season stream flows that are currently consumed by irrigation and to help mitigate declining groundwater tables in the upper Grande Ronde Valley. The study considered whether artificial recharge can be used in the Bear Creek and Lostine River watersheds, and whether artificial recharge and aquifer storage and recovery options are available in the upper Catherine Creek and upper Grande Ronde River watersheds


Accomplishments – Complete
The study considered whether artificial recharge can be used in the Bear Creek and Lostine River watersheds, and whether artificial recharge and aquifer storage and recovery options are available in the upper Catherine Creek and upper Grande Ronde River watersheds

Potential Implementation Strategy
There are potentials for BPA and the NFWF to start some streamflow augmentation from ground water in the near future. Monitoring these activities may be valuable data to add to the results of the study. This would enhance the findings of the study. Establishing a program with BPA to enhance streamflow has the potential of continued pumping from the ASR if the storage is needed.

Related Department Activities

Allocation of Conserved Water, Transfers, Water Rights Transactions.




Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust - GC0013 09
Awarded to Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust
Description
The study designed improvements to KBRT’s water transaction program for the Upper Klamath Lake watershed. The planning study identified flow targets, developed an administrative transaction structure, a pricing framework, and a funding structure for the program.


Accomplishments - Complete
Previous modeling determined that an additional 30,000 acre-feet of water needs to flow into the lake each year. KBRT is building upon existing data, short-term instream leases, and partnerships to develop a plan for a water transactions program to keep needed water instream and flowing to the lake. The grant process enhanced a funding partnership with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), which currently administers a water transactions program in the Columbia Basin. As a result of the grant allows KBRT and NFWF better collaborate on projects in the Upper Klamath Basin

Potential Implementation Strategy
Better transaction ability will help draw cooperating land owners, funding agencies and help implement the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement (KBRA). In addition to the enhanced ability to conduct transactions for instream uses, the lessons learned will be valuable for the statutorily required re-examination of the “split season-use” authority which sun-sets in 2014 (?).

Related Department Activities
Allocation of conserved water, instream water rights transfers, instream water rights leasing.


Mosier Watershed Council - GB0016 09
Awarded to Mosier Watershed Council
Description

Groundwater levels have been declining in the agriculture-dependent Mosier Valley since significant irrigation pumping began in the 1960s. In 2005, the Mosier Watershed Council, in partnership with the Department, U.S. Geologic Survey, and others initiated a geologic study and ground modeling process to determine Mosier’s sustainable groundwater yield. The study evaluated the feasibility of implementing Artificial Recharge (AR) or Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) to maintain that sustainable yield. Hydrogeological, physical, regulatory, ecological and economic feasibilities of AR or ASR and other alternatives are to be considered.

Accomplishments - Complete
The goal to meet the long-term water needs of the residents and agricultural economy of Mosier Valley, predicted to be approximately 1,900 acre-feet per year, in a sustainable way that will reverse the current groundwater decline and the resulting decline in Mosier Creek base flows.

Potential Implementation Strategy

Achievement of the study goal will be based on evaluation the feasibility study in pursuing well repairs, AR or ASR or above-ground storage and conservation alternatives.


Related Department Activities
Ground Water Program, Well Construction and Water Management and Conservation Program




Tigard Area Water Reuse Study - GR0021 09
Awarded to Tigard Area Water Reuse Study
Description
Since 1984, Clean Water Services (CWS) has been producing reuse water for irrigation within the Cities of Tigard and Durham. The goal of the study was to expand the reuse of wastewater treatment plant effluent to enhance a suburban stream identified as a project in the Tigard City Center Renewal Plan, improve the livability of the Tigard downtown core, and augment the flow of Fanno Creek. Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River that is impacted by low summertime flows its lowest flow was 1 cubic foot per second (cfs) in September 2001, and frequently is less than 5 cfs in July and August. Fanno Creek also exceeds temperature standards established for protecting salmonids.

Accomplishments - Competed
The study evaluated the feasibility of expanding the reuse of effluent from CWS 21 MGD Durham Advanced Wastewater Treatment Facility to serve the Tigard’s downtown area to reduce the demands on Fanno Creek.
1) Potential demand for reuse
2) Benefits and impacts of reducing discharge to the Tualatin River;
3) Capital improvements needed to deliver reuse water to meet the demand;
4) O & M costs;
5) Public acceptance issues in a downtown area
6) Assessed opportunities for reuse water to restore Fanno Creek flows.
(link to final report below)

Potential Implementation Strategy
Working with DEQ and local partners the Department can help improve conditions in the Tualatin Watershed.

Related Department Activities
Water Management and Conservation Plans and Registration of reclaimed water



Water for Irrigation, Streams and Economy (WISE) Project - GC0012 09
Awarded and Declined by Water for Irrigation, Streams and Economy (WISE) Project - GC0012 09
Description
The Water for Irrigation, Streams and Economy (WISE) Project is working provide long term integrated water resource management in the Little Butte Creek and Bear Creek watersheds. Conservation alternatives that have been developed included replacing existing earthen canals with pipelines, using reclaimed effluent for irrigation and using conserved water to improve stream flows. The Little Butte Creek watershed provides prime Coho salmon spawning habitat for the Rogue River Basin, and the Bear Creek watershed is well known for its fruit and other agricultural products. The WISE Project Advisory Committee, with 19 members representing instream, agricultural, irrigation and municipal interests, is leading this effort, which includes public outreach beyond the requirements of the FS/EIS. This planning study was designed to gather and analyze the relevant data and information to develop the best possible product and provide all stakeholders the opportunity to participate in the project development and planning.

Accomplishments

None – grant declined by applicant

Potential Implementation Strategy

None

Related Department Activities
None

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