Reducing Disproportionate
    Minority Contact
    in the Juvenile Justice System

 

 

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Work Group Sessions

2012 Governor's Summit on

Reducing Disproportionate Minority Contact
 in Juvenile Justice

"Taking Action for Justice and Fairness through
Commitment, Collaboration, Data and Accountability"

November 1 & 2, 2012
Spirit Mountain Conference Center, Grand Ronde


 

Summit attendees select and participate in the same work group both days of the Summit.

 

Work Group Sessions


Internal School Discipline Impact on DMC

Description

The education strand will include collaboration and action planning to address the expulsion and suspension (exclusionary discipline) of youth of color from the K-12 school system. The goal of this work session is to respond to relevant questions regarding the disproportionate use of exclusionary discipline, as well as identifying resources to assist with developing a viable action plan to communicate interagency commitments to implement alternatives to out of school suspensions (OSS) and expulsions.

 

The session will explore constructive and instructional ways to handle issues at school vs. excluding students.  Educationally, allowing a student to continue in a regular school setting is preferable to suspension or expulsion.  Participants will explore various programs and strategies that assist with reducing behavioral issues that lead to exclusion from school, as well as dialogue about other methods to assist with reducing and/or eliminating exclusionary discipline and its disproportionate occurrence with youth of color.

Facilitators

Michael Mahoney
Coordinator, Safe & Healthy Schools, Oregon Department of Education

Simon Gonsoulin
Director, National Evaluation and Technical Assistance Center
for the Education of Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk

John Hall
Coordinator, Department of School Security, Memphis City Schools, Tennessee

 

Work Group Materials

 

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Law Enforcement Arrests and Referrals

Description

The law enforcement office not only serves as the gatekeeper, but, to most representatives of the community, is the face of the justice system.  The workshop will examine the impact of law enforcement decisions at the point of arrest and diversion on the overall strategy of reducing Disproportionate Minority contact (DMC) and will include identification of factors that contribute to and development of strategies to reduce DMC.

Facilitators

Lindsey Draper

Chief Ronald J. Louie (Ret.) MA, MPA

Commander John Schmerber
 

Work Group Materials

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Monitoring Detention Admissions as an Indicator of Potential Disparities in a Local Juvenile Justice System and Practices of Partner Agencies

Description

This work session will look at why it is important to monitor data related to juvenile detention for potential disparities that may be occurring in various parts of the juvenile justice system.  The session will focus on knowing where the data is, the importance of analyzing this data locally on an ongoing basis, making sure the data is correct, and how to report results in a meaningful way to policy makers and community partners.

 

Participants will work in groups with examples of "real life data".  Participants will learn why it's important to develop strategies based on an analysis of local data and local circumstances.  Work session participants will develop recommendations for how jurisdictions can develop meaningful action plans with strategies for changing policies, procedures and/or practices that may be generating or contributing to disparities or overrepresentation in certain areas of the system.

Facilitators

Sonya Littledeer-Evans

Jeff Milligan

Troy Fuller
 

Work Group Materials

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Petitions, Courts, Adjudication

Description

Using the Relative Rate Index and the DMC Assessment report as a starting point, this work group will assess possible DMC issues in the overall adjudication process.  This will include the processes of filing petitions, engaging in the court process and eventual adjudication and selection of sentencing options.  Facilitators will lead discussions to explore available options at each stage, model community services which may address DMC, and elements of the process of choosing between options.  The concepts of explicit and implicit bias will be used to examine the development of options and the choices between those options.

Participants will develop a range of options based on successful strategies across Oregon and the rest of the country.  The objective will be to select a set of potential options and implementation strategies to accomplish DMC reduction. 

Facilitators

Dr. William Feyerherm

Craig Prins

John Haroldson

 

Work Group Materials

 

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Multi-system Approaches to Reduce Disparities and
Improve Outcomes for "Crossover" Youth

Description

Oregon has been engaged in a concerted effort to reduce disproportionate representation of children and youth of color in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems for a number of years.  Statewide and local decision point analysis of both systems revealed key areas of concern and suggested factors contributing to disparities. The multiple pathways that youth, and youth of color in particular, follow into the juvenile justice system require a multi-system response, particularly when one of those pathways begins with child abuse and neglect and involvement with the child welfare system, i.e. crossover youth.

This work session will highlight various research findings and explore the environmental factors, such as the role of education, families and communities, health and behavioral health services, law enforcement, and others.  The work session participants will develop a strategic plan that will focus on practice and system responses that serve to reduce disparities and improve outcomes for crossover population of young people.

Facilitators

Brad Richardson, Ph.D.
Research Director, Office of Justice Assistance, University of Iowa

Honorable Judge Nan Waller
Multnomah County Circuit Court

Abbey Stamp, LCSW
Juvenile Court Improvement Coordinator, Multnomah County Juvenile Services Division

 

Work Group Materials

 

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Youth Re-Entry into the Community

Description

Reentry provides a major opportunity to reduce recidivism, save taxpayer dollars, and make our communities safer.”  Attorney General Eric Holder, January 2011

 

Each year hundreds of youth under the age of 18 leave the secured juvenile justice facilities in Oregon.  The statewide recidivism rate is 28.1% (Juvenile Justice Information System 2010 Recidivism Report); and there are higher recidivism rates among minority youth.  Other data will be provided during the work session as well.

 

Many of these youth have characteristics that are prevalent and present challenges to the youth, their families, and the professionals who work with them.  Youth who are released from institutional confinement are more likely to succeed if they have a collaborative, individualized support team that includes the active participation of the youth and their family; community-based natural supports; local educators to promote educational success; community-based treatment service providers; and skill builders to assist them with training for employment, mentorships, etc.

 

Participants in this work group session will discuss the unique challenges of juvenile reentry; discuss specific barriers for minority youth reentering the community; identify ways that professional and natural supports can assist youth reentry; identify and develop strategies to reduce recidivism among minority youth.

Facilitators

Faith V. Love

Paul Solomon

 

Work Group Materials

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Youth Summit

Description

Each day, thousands of youth in our nation - including Oregon - are in secured juvenile institutions (ages 12-17).  In Oregon, the Oregon Youth Authority can serve youth up to age 24 if their crimes were committed prior to the age of age 18.

 

Data has shown that African American/Black youth are referred to the juvenile court at a much higher rate than their white counterparts who commit similar crimes.  Native American youth are detained in secured detention almost twice the rate of white youth; and African American and Hispanic youth are transferred to adult court at a higher rate as well.

 

The Youth Summit will provide an opportunity for youth to learn more about the disproportionate minority contact (DMC) in the juvenile justice system. Youth will work together to discuss barriers, policies or procedures that impact their daily lives and other youth in their communities.

 

Youth will discuss ideas and develop recommendations to share with decision makers and others attending the Governor’s Summit.  Youth will also have a chance to work in teams to examine potential prevention activities to help youth avoid contact with the juvenile justice system; and promote other services or supports that will help them be successful in school, community and work.

Facilitator

Jordan Thierry, Director
Black Fatherhood Project

 

Work Group Materials

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