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Education Service Districts Transparency

Introduction

The purpose of Oregon’s Education Service Districts is defined in Oregon law (Oregon Revised Statute ORS 334.005): Education service districts originated in Oregon's first laws establishing a general system of common schools - a system that has maintained but changed the responsibilities and names of Oregon's mid-level education service entity.
 
Throughout the history of Oregon's regional services system, local governance and state statutes concerning the mission of ESDs has remained somewhat constant: "Education Service Districts assist school districts and the State of Oregon in achieving Oregon's education goals by providing equitable educational opportunities for all of Oregon’s public  school students."
 
Today, each ESD provides regional services to its component school districts, primarily in areas that the school districts alone would not be able to adequately and equitably provide.  Examples would be high cost technology systems and children with severe disabilities who qualify under the category of high cost but low incidence.   These services are basically offered within four large categories: Special Needs Children, School Improvement, Technology and Administrative services.
 
Today, there are 19 ESDs serving Oregon’s 36 counties.
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ESD Revenues (Money Coming In)

Funding Overview
 
Education service districts in Oregon are funded through multiple funding sources: Property taxes, state and federal contracts and grants, state timber receipts, and the State School Fund (SSF) formula.
 
ESD's General Fund funding comes from a set amount per ADMw (Average Daily Membership weighted). This amount is made up of property taxes at a unique permanent tax rate.  Other general fund sources are state timber tax receipts and the Oregon State School Funds (SSF).

Apportionment
  • Each ESD, by statute, must spend at least 90% of their total SSF funds directly on school district programs or services.  The other 10% is allocated for the operation of the ESD.
  • State contracts, such as Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education and Long-Term Care and Treatment programs, make up another portion of an ESD’s budget. 
  •  
  • In addition, school districts often contract with their ESD for additional services beyond what is provided in the Local Service Plan.

Reporting

The ESD Revenue data is from audited financial statements that are received in December of each school year.  After these statements are received, it then takes about 3-4 months to review and validate the data. The most recent data is provided in the following reports.


ESD Revenue Data by Year

ESD Revenue Data Reports from current and previous years are provided below.

For questions about ESD Revenues, contact Brian Reeder, Oregon Department of Education. 


Data Viewer - Guidelines
Clicking on the Data Viewer links above will open up a new window and redirect you to the data.oregon.gov website.  Here you will be able to use a wide range of tools to visualize and download data, or create graphs and maps, or filter data, etc.  The data stored on data.oregon.gov is powered by the Socrata platform. You can find additional resources on how to use the platform to socialize data by visiting the Socrata Knowledge Base and Community Forums.

 

If you need assistance, have general questions, comments, or suggestions for additions to the web site, please e-mail us at oregon.transparency@oregon.gov, or use our online form. 

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ESD: Expenditures \ Contracts \ Salary Information 2014

Individual reports are provide in the table below for expenditures, contracts, and salary information, for each Oregon ESD for the fiscal year 2014 (July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014).

Expenditures
 
Generally, the information contained in these ESD expenditure reports (i.e., cash transactions/ payments) was generated as follows:
  • All payments for the fiscal year 2014 (July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014) that were applied to an expense account.
  •  
  • If applicable, payments to employees whose records are specifically protected from disclosure based on a protective court order were removed. Payments to all other employees are included.

Contracts

These reports provide information on contracts and amendments to contracts issued from July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014. The information was generated by each of the respective ESD contract/  procurement systems.
 
The data files (reports) provided below contain information regarding the ESDs' contracts for a variety of goods and/or services. The amounts are estimates of the spend through these contracts,
not actural expenditure information.
Salary Information

These reports provide ESD Workforce and Salary Information from July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014. The data available below contain information regarding the ESDs' positions and salary information. In general, the salary information in the files represent annualized salaries of full time, part time, and if applicable, seasonal or temporary employees. There are instances, however, where transparency of information is enhanced by providing the actual salary paid to an individual positon. An example of such a position is a substitute teacher.
 
However, it does not include payments for benefits or vacation payout. This salary data may not reconcile to a full-time annualized salary rate or actual wages paid. Reasons include fluctuations in work effort, number of months worked in a year, and terms and conditions of employment that change over time.
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How to Access the Data
 
Click on the name of any ESD Expenditure, Contract, or Salary listing in the table below. This will open up a new window and redirect you to the data.oregon.gov website. Here you will be able to use a wide range of tools to visualize and download data, or create graphs and maps, or filter data, etc.
 
Table of ESD: 2014  Expenditures, Contracts, and Salary Information
ESD Expenditures Contracts Salaries
Clackamas Clackamas Expenditures Clackamas
Contracts
Clackamas
Salaries
Columbia Gorge Columbia Expenditures
Columbia Gorge Contracts
Columbia Gorge Salaries
Douglas Douglas
Expenditures
Douglas
Contracts
Douglas
Salaries
Grant Grant
Expenditures
Grant
Contracts
Grant
Salaries
Harney Harney
Expenditures
Harney
Contracts
Harney
Salaries
High Desert High Desert Expenditures High Desert
Contracts
High Desert
Salaries
Inter Mountain Inter Mountain Expenditures InterMountain Contracts InterMountain
Salaries
Jefferson Jefferson
Expenditures
Jefferson
Contracts
Jefferson
Salaries
Lake Lake
Expenditures
Lake
Contracts
Lake
Salaries
Lane Lane
Expenditures
Lane
Contracts
Lane
Salaries
Linn Benton Lincoln Linn Benton Lincoln Expenditures Linn Benton
Contracts
Linn Benton Lincoln Salaries
Malheur Malheur
Expenditures
Malheur
Contracts
Malheur
Salaries
Multnomah Multnomah Expenditures Multnomah
Contracts
Multnomah
Salaries
North Central North Central Expenditures North Central
Contracts
North Central
Salaries
Northwest Regional Northwest Regional Expenditures Northwest Regional Contracts Northwest Regional Salaries
South Coast
South Coast Expenditures South Coast
Contracts
South Coast
Salaries
Southern Oregon Southern Oregon Expenditures Southern Oregon Contracts Southern Oregon Salaries
Wallowa Wallowa County Expenditures Wallowa
Contracts
Wallowa County Salaries
Willamette Willamette Expenditures Willamette
Contracts
Willamette
Salaries
 

The data stored on data.oregon.gov is powered by the Socrata platform. You can find additional resources on how to use the platform to socialize data by visiting the Socrata Knowledge Base and Community Forums.

 

If you need assistance, have general questions, comments, or suggestions for additions to the web site, please e-mail us at oregon.transparency@oregon.gov, or use our online form.

For questions about ESD Expenditures, Contracts, or Workforce and Salary Information please contact Jim Mabbot, Executive Director, Oregon Association of Education Service Districts.

ESD Audit Reports

The following body of information contains hyperlinks to available Audit Reports issued by various institutions. Audits performed by the Oregon Secretary of State for Schools and ESDs are also available through the Oregon Secretary of State link provided below.
_________________________________________________________________________________
Oregon Secretary of State: Audits performed by the Oregon Secretary of State for Schools and ESDs are available through the following link.
 For questions about ESD Audit Reports, please contact Jim Mabbot, Executive Director, Oregon Association of Education Service Districts.B

ESD Local Service Plans

Local Service Plan Overview
 
What is a Local Service Plan?  Each ESD, in partnership with their component school districts, must annually develop a Local Service Plan which determines how the State School Funds (SSF), will be used. Ninety percent of the SSF revenue received by an ESD is subject to this process.
 
The Local Service Plan determines programs and services that the ESD will offer its component districts for the following fiscal year. The Plan must include services from at least the following categories:
  • Special education
  • Technology
  • School improvement 
  • Administration
The Plan must also include any "entrepreneurial services" that the ESD intends to offer to any entity either outside of the ESD boundary or inside the ESD boundary but not to a component school district.
 
Under the Resolution Process, by March 1 of the preceding year, at least two-thirds of the school district school boards in an ESD, representing more than one-half of the student population, must approve the Local Service Plan in order for it to be implemented.
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Local Service Plans
 
The links below provide access to the published Local Service Plans of the individual ESDs or their primary website. 
For questions about ESD Local Service Plans, please contact Jim Mabbot, Executive Director, Oregon Association of Education Service Districts.Ba
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Additional Resources

A list of additional resources about Oregon's Education Service Districts is provided below. Depending on the individual ESD, the information below includes: Annual Reports, Guide to Services, Budget Information, etc.
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Major Periods in ESD History
(This is information is provided courtesy of the Northwest Regional ESD Website)
  1849-1871 Origination and foundation established
  1872-1944 The County Unit as regulatory arm of the state
  1945-1962 Rural School Districts and equalization
  1963-1976 Became Intermediate Education Districts (IEDs)/Advent of Services
  1994
Passage of SB 26, the ESD Reorganization Act
  1997
Passage of Ballot Measure 47 & 50 converted ESD tax bases to "rates"
  1977-Present Became Education Service Districts (ESDs)
  1998-present 
The era of funding regional services on an equity-based formula
  2005 
Passage of HB 3184 implementing ESD funding and governance reforms.
 
2007
Passage of SB 255 staggering board member terms of office
  2011 Passage of SB 250 implementing ESD funding and service reforms
 
  1849-1871 Origination and foundation established
  1872-1944 The County Unit as regulatory arm of the state
  1945-1962 Rural School Districts and equalization
  1963-1976 Became Intermediate Education Districts (IEDs)/Advent of Services
  1994
Passage of SB 26, the ESD Reorganization Act
  1997
Passage of Ballot Measure 47 & 50 converted ESD tax bases to "rates"
  1977-Present Became Education Service Districts (ESDs)
  1998-present 
The era of funding regional services on an equity-based formula
  2005 
Passage of HB 3184 implementing ESD funding and governance reforms.
 
2007
Passage of SB 255 staggering board member terms of office
  2011 Passage of SB 250 implementing ESD funding and service reforms
 
1945The Legislature created the county "rural school district." In the early 1960s, rural school districts began to provide special education services for disabled children. The Legislature studied the role of the county school superintendent's office and its potential for the future. In 1963, it replaced the "rural school district" title with "Intermediate Education District" (IED).
 
1977The Legislature changed the name of the intermediate education district to "education service district." This change reflected the growing recognition that the county office had become a major service center for local districts. Also, the passage of the Public Law 94-142, the federal legislation guaranteeing to all students with handicaps the right to a free and appropriate education, made the ESD's role as a provider of special education services even more important and necessary, as did the State's increased interest in early intervention and early childhood education programs, the same of which was occurring on a national basis.
 
 
1991The Legislature authorized a task force to study regional services on a statewide basis. The 1993 Legislature passed SB 26, the ESD Reorganization Act, which required the merger of 29 ESDs down to 21, including the annexation of six county units (Crook, Klamath, Lincoln, Morrow, Hood River, and Josephine) into one of the remaining 21 ESDs, i.e., Linn-Benton ESD annexed Lincoln County School District and became a three-county unit named Linn-Benton-Lincoln ESD; and Clatsop, Columbia, Tillamook, and Washington ESDs began the merger process to become the Northwest Regional ESD. (In 2003 Yamhill ESD voluntarily merged with Willamette ESD to further reduce the number of ESDs in the state to 20.)
 
2000The Legislature completed an interim task force study of ESDs. As a result of that study, the Legislature passed two major pieces of legislation: SB 259 and SB 260. Senate Bill 259 reestablished the primary mission of ESDs: "The mission of Education Service Districts is to assist school districts and the Department of Education in achieving Oregon's educational goals by providing equitable, high quality, cost-effective and locally responsive educational services at a regional level."
 
SB 259 also establishes that ESDs exist to help:
1. Ensure an equitable and excellent education for all children in the state
2. Implement the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century
3. Foster the attainment of high standards of performance by all students in Oregon's public schools
4. Facilitate inter-organizational coordination and cooperation among educational, social service, health care and employment training agencies.
 
Senate Bill 260 addressed two major issues regarding ESD funding:
1. Through a progressive five-year process, funding was equalized across Oregon ESDs in fiscal year 2005-2006.
2. ESD funding became connected to local district funding in that a small portion of the State School Fund allocation to a region is distributed to the ESD with the remainder distributed to local districts in accordance with the state funding formula. In fiscal year 2001-2002, 4.888% of the region's State School Fund allocation was used to fund the ESD. That percentage increased gradually over the next four years, such that in the fiscal year 2004-2005, 5.097% of the regional State School Fund allocation was used to fund ESDs.
 
2005The Legislature passed House Bill 3184 which implemented reforms to ESD funding and governance.  Beginning with the 2006-07 school year, the K-12 state budget formula changed: School districts now receive 95.25% of the region's State School Fund allocation and ESDs will receive 4.75%. High Desert ESD, Willamette ESD and Northwest Regional ESD were selected to pilot the governance reform portion of the new law:
1. The terms of the 2005-06 Board members were now set to expire on June 30, 2006.
2. For the purpose of modifying the governance of the ESD’s involved in the pilot project, their regions were divided up into zones of approximately equal population and the zones could not cross district boundaries. From each of these zones, each school district board within the zone had one vote to cast to determine representation on the ESD board. That process produced five ESD board members who took office July 1, 2006. They in turn appointed one board member from each of the following regional groups: higher education, social services, the business community, and one at-large member.
3. The appointees took office on August 8, 2006. The result was a new nine-member ESD board whose terms were to all expire on June 30, 2010.
 
2011The Legislature passed Senate Bill 250 which allows local districts located in the Multnomah ESD, Northwest Regional ESD, Willamette ESD and Baker County to withdraw from the ESD beginning with the 2012-13 school year (As of Dec. 15, 2011, of 59 school districts eligible, 6 will withdraw for certain and another 5 are considering it.).  A district must notify their ESD in November of the prior year of their intent to withdraw and provide final notice and official action to withdraw by March 1. 
SB 250 also reduced ESD funding from 4.75% to 4.5% of the state school fund beginning July 1, 2011.  In addition, the state Office of Regional Education Services was created.  The pilot governance ESDs were also extended.
 
Union-Baker ESD merged with Umatilla-Morrow ESD to form the new Intermountain ESD.  There are now 19 ESDs in Oregon.