584-420-0015 Reading Instruction Standards – NEW PROPOSED RULE
 
(1) Purpose of the Standards:  ORS 342.147 requires educator preparation providers to provide training on reading instruction to candidates that enables to public school students to meet or exceed third-grade reading standards and become proficient readers to the end of the third grade.
 
[Note: This rule is established pursuant to Section 1, Chapter 427, Oregon Laws 2015 (Enrolled HB 3069).] 
 
(2) Scope of standards:  The reading instruction standards apply to all Oregon educator preparation programs preparing candidates for:
(a) Elementary-Multiple Subjects;
(b) English to Speakers of Other Languages;
(c) Reading Intervention; and
(d) Special Education: Generalist.
 
(3) Oregon educator preparation programs as provided in subsection (2) must provide coursework, curriculum and other necessary reading training that enables candidates to:
(a) Provide classroom instruction that aligns with the adopted standards of State Board of Education for:
(A) Early childhood literacy;
(B) First grade reading standards;
(C) Second grade reading standards; and
(D)Third grade reading standards.
(b) Implement reading strategies to enable public school students to become proficient readers by the end of third grade.
(c) Oregon educator preparation programs must demonstrate compliance with the reading instruction standards as provided in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook by June 30, 2017.  If a program is unable to meet the reading instruction standards by this date, it must submit:
(A) A plan to the Commission for meeting the reading instruction standards by June 30, 2018;
(B) A progress report on implementing reading instruction standards to the Commission on January 15, 2018.
 
 
584-420-0016 Dyslexia Instruction Standards – NEW PROPOSED RULE
 
(1) Purpose of the Standards:  ORS 342.147 requires adoption of standards for instruction on dyslexia that are aligned with the International Dyslexia Association.  The requirement applies to endorsement areas that include a significant focus on reading instruction:  Elementary Education-Multiple Subjects, English to Speakers of Other Languages, Reading Intervention and Special Education: Generalist endorsements.  The purpose of the dyslexia instruction standards is to provide educators with the knowledge and pedagogy skills that best serve students with dyslexia and other learning disabilities. 
 
[Note: This rule is established pursuant to Section 8, Chapter 245, Oregon Laws 2015 (Enrolled HB 2412).] 
 
(2) Scope of Standards:  Educator preparation programs preparing candidates for Elementary Education-Multiple Subjects, English to Speakers of Other Languages, Reading Intervention and Special Education: Generalist must include:
(a) Demonstration of candidate knowledge of the structure of language as provided by subsection (4) of this rule;
(b) Coursework for Elementary-Multiple Subjects and English to Speakers of Other Languages endorsement programs as provided in subsection (5) of this rule;
(c) Coursework for Reading Intervention and Special Education: Generalist endorsement programs as provided in subsection (6) of this rule;
(d) Practicum application as provided in subsection (7) of this rule.
 
(3) Implementation of Standards:  The Commission is adopting the following implementation plan for the dyslexia instruction standards as provided in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook:
(a) By December 15, 2016, all Commission recognized programs for Elementary-Multiple Subjects, English to Speakers of Other Languages, Reading Intervention, and Special Education: Generalist endorsements must submit an implementation plan for the new dyslexia instruction standards.
(A) The plan must include an implementation date of no later than July 1, 2017 to fully incorporate new dyslexia standards into the program.
(B) The plan must include how all candidates entering the program after July 1, 2017 will receive dyslexia instruction as provided by this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook. 
(b) By May 1, 2017, the Commission will review and approve the plans for implementation;
(c) On June 30, 2017, all current Commission-recognized Elementary Education-Multiple Subjects, English to Speakers of Other Languages, Special Education: Generalist and Reading Intervention programs will sunset. 
(d) On July 1, 2017, the Commission will provide new recognition to Elementary Education-Multiple Subjects, English to Speakers of Other Languages, Special Education: Generalist and Reading Intervention programs that have met the new dyslexia instruction standards. 
 
(4) Knowledge of Structure of Language: Candidates prepared for Elementary – Multiple Subjects, ESOL, Special Education: Generalist and Reading Intervention endorsements must demonstrate knowledge of the structure of language through one of the following methods:
(a) Completion of college-level coursework related to the structure of language.
(A) The coursework must be at least 3 quarter or 2 semester hours.
(B) Candidates must receive a “C” grade or better in each of the college-level courses submitted to fulfill this requirement.
(C) The coursework must align with the standards for the Knowledge of the Structure of Language in the Knowledge and Practice Standards for Teachers of Reading of the International Dyslexia Association (2010) as provided in the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.
(D) The coursework may be a pre-requisite or program completion requirement as determined by the educator preparation program.
(b) Obtaining a passing score on an exam that assesses knowledge of the structure of language.
(A) The exam must align with the standards for the Knowledge of the Structure of Language as provided in the Knowledge and Practice Standards for Teachers of Reading of the International Dyslexia Association (2010).
(B) The Commission must approve any program-selected examination and the proposed level for passing score prior to program implementation.  Any changes to this provision will be considered a major modification of the program.
 
(5) Elementary/ESOL Coursework: Educator preparation programs preparing candidates for Elementary-Multiple Subjects and English to Speakers of Other Languages endorsements must meet the following requirements:
(a) Language and Assessment Instruction (Level 1):  Candidates must complete at least 6 quarter or 4 semester hours of level 1 instruction on:
(A) Foundation concepts about oral and written learning (Standard 1);
(B) Structured language teaching (Standard 2); and
(C) Interpretation and administration of assessments for planning instruction (Standard 3).
 
(b) Dyslexia Instruction (Level 1): Candidates must complete at least 3 quarter or 2 semester hours of level 1 instruction on the knowledge of dyslexia and other learning disorders (Standard 4).
 
(c) All courses required by this subsection must meet the standards set forth in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.
 
[Note:  The requirements for level 1 instruction are provided in the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.]
 
(6) Reading/Special Education Coursework: Educator preparation programs preparing candidates for Reading Intervention and Special Education: Generalist endorsements must meet the following requirements:
 
(a) Level 1 Instruction: Candidates must obtain the level 1 instruction for language, assessment and dyslexia as provided in subsection (5) of this rule.  Candidates may complete the level 1 coursework prior to entering the Reading Intervention or Special Education: Generalist endorsement program. 
 
[Note:  For example, a candidate may have already completed the level 1 instruction in their previous Elementary Education-Multiple Subjects or ESOL endorsement program.]
 
(b) Language and Assessment Instruction (Level 2):  Candidates must complete at least 3 semester or 2 quarter hours of level 2 instruction on:
(A) Foundation concepts about oral and written learning (Standard 1);
(B) Structured language teaching (Standard 2); and
(C) Interpretation and administration of assessments for planning instruction (Standard 4).
 
(c) Dyslexia Instruction (Level 2): Candidates must complete at least 3 quarter or 2 semester hours of level 2 instruction on the knowledge of dyslexia and other learning disorders.
(d) All courses required by this subsection must meet the standards set forth in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.
 
[Note:  The requirements for level 2 instruction are provided in the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.]
 
(7) Practicum for Dyslexia Instruction:
(a) Elementary and ESOL:  Candidates for Elementary-Multiple Subject and English to Speakers of Other Languages must complete a supervised practicum that is focused on dyslexia instruction.  The practicum must include:
(A)  A minimum of 20 hours;
[Note:  The 20 hours may be included as part of the practicum hour requirements for the Elementary or ESOL endorsements.]
(B) One to one instruction with a student identified, or at risk of being identified, with a reading or writing disability;
(C) Observation of candidate application of level 1 knowledge and skills as provided in the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook. 
 
[Note: For reference, the level 1 knowledge and skills required in practicum observation are listed immediately below.  The TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook will include this list of knowledge and skills when it is completed and adopted by the Commission.]
 
During the practicum observation, candidates demonstrate the ability to:
·         Assess student’s fluency rate and determine reasonable expectations for reading fluency, using research‐based guidelines and appropriate state and local standards and benchmarks (Level 1).
·         Match examples of student responses and learning behavior to phases in language and literacy development (Level 1).
·         Direct student’s attention to speech sounds during reading, spelling, and vocabulary instruction using a mirror, discussion of articulatory features, and so on as scripted or prompted (Level 1).
·         Simultaneously use two or three learning modalities (to include listening, speaking, movement, touch, reading, and/or writing) to increase engagement and enhance memory (Level 1).
·         Plan and effectively teach all steps in a decoding lesson, including single‐word reading and connected text that is read fluently, accurately, and with appropriate intonation and expression (Level 1).
·         Explain why a student is/is not meeting goals and expectations in reading or writing for his or her age/grade (Level 1).
·         Select and implement activities that match a student’s developmental level of phonological skill (Level 1).
·         Match students with appropriate texts as informed by fluency rate to promote ample independent oral and silent reading (Level 1).
·         Identify student interests and needs to motivate independent reading (Level 1).
·         Teach word meanings directly using contextual examples, structural (morpheme) analysis, antonyms and synonyms, definitions, connotations, multiple meanings, and semantic feature analysis (Levels 1 and 2).
·         State purpose for reading, elicit or provide background knowledge, and explore key vocabulary (Level 1).
·         Query during text reading to foster attention to detail, inference‐making, and mental model construction (Level 1).
·         Use graphic organizers, note‐taking strategies, retelling and summarizing, and cross‐text comparisons (Level 1).
·         Model, practice, and share written responses to text; foster explicit connections between new learning and what was already known (Level 1).
·         Use multisensory techniques to teach letter naming and letter formation in manuscript and cursive forms (Level 1).
·         Implement strategies to build fluency in letter formation, copying and transcription of written language (Level 1).
·         Analyze students’ writing to determine specific instructional needs.
·         Provide specific, constructive feedback to students targeted to students’ most critical needs in writing.
·         Administer screenings and progress monitoring assessments and explaining why individual students are or are not at risk in reading based on their performance on screening assessments (Level 1)
·         Recognize scientifically accepted characteristics of individuals with poor word recognition (e.g., overdependence on context to aid word recognition; inaccurate non-word reading) (Level 1).
·         Recognize levels of instructional intensity, duration, and scope appropriate for mild, moderate, and severe reading disabilities (Level 1).
 
(b) Reading Intervention and Special Education: Generalist:  Candidates for Reading Intervention and Special Education: Generalist must complete a supervised practicum that is focused on dyslexia instruction.  The supervised practicum must include:
(A)  A minimum of 30 hours of dyslexia instruction.
[Note:  The 30 hours may be included as part of the practicum hour requirements for the Reading and Special Education: Generalist endorsements.]
(B) One to one instruction with a student with an IEP in a reading or writing disability;
(C)  Observation of candidate application of level 2 skills and knowledge as provided in the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.
 
[Note: For reference, the level 2 knowledge and skills required in practicum observation are listed immediately below.  The TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook will include this list of knowledge and skills when it is completed and adopted by the Commission.]
 
During the practicum observation, candidates demonstrate the ability to:
·         Identify the most salient instructional needs of students who are at different points of reading and writing development (Level 2).
·         Design and justify the implementation of activities that match a student’s developmental level of phonological skill (Level 2).
·         Teach articulatory features of phonemes and words; use minimally contrasting pairs of sounds and words in instruction; support instruction with manipulative materials and movement (Level 2).
·         Direct student’s attention to speech sounds during reading, spelling, and vocabulary instruction without scripting or prompting (Level 2).
·         Explicitly contrast first and second language phonological systems, as appropriate, to anticipate which sounds may be most challenging for the second language learner (Level 2).
·         Adapt the pace, format, content, strategy, or emphasis of instruction according to students’ pattern of response (Level 2).
·         Determine the need for fluency oriented approach to instruction, using screening, diagnostic, and progress‐monitoring assessments (Level 2).
·         Make appropriate recommendations for use of assistive technology in general education classes for students with different reading profiles (e.g., dyslexia versus language disabilities) (Level 2).
·         Teach word meanings directly using contextual examples, structural (morpheme) analysis, antonyms and synonyms, definitions, connotations, multiple meanings, and semantic feature analysis (Levels 1 and 2).
·         Anticipate confusions and teach comprehension of figurative language, complex sentence forms, cohesive devices, and unfamiliar features of text (Level 2).
·         Adjust the emphasis of lessons to accommodate learners’ strengths and weaknesses and pace of learning (Level 2).
·         Analyze a student’s spelling errors to determine his or her instructional needs (e.g., development of phonological skills versus learning spelling rules versus application of orthographic or morphemic knowledge in spelling) (Level 2).
·         Analyze students’ writing to determine specific instructional needs.
·         Provide specific, constructive feedback to students targeted to students’ most critical needs in writing.
·         Accurately interpret subtest scores from diagnostic surveys to describe a student’s patterns of strengths and weaknesses and instructional needs; (Level 2).
·         Administer educational diagnostic assessments using standardized procedures (Level 2).
·         Write reports that clearly and accurately summarize a student’s current skills in important component areas of reading and reading comprehension (Level 2).
·         Write appropriate, specific recommendations for instruction and educational programming based on assessment data (Level 2).
·         Match symptoms of the major subgroups of poor readers as established by research, including those with dyslexia, and identify typical case study profiles of those individuals (Level 2).
·         Identify predictable ways that symptoms might change as students move through the grades (Level 2).
 
(8) Standard 1: Foundation Concepts about Oral and Written Learning: Candidates demonstrate the ability to:
(a)  Understand and explain the language processing requirements of proficient reading and writing, including:
(A) Phonological (speech sound) processing;
(B) Orthographic (print) processing;
(C) Semantic (meaning) processing;
(D) Syntactic (sentence level) processing; and
(E) Discourse (connected text level) processing.
(b) Understand and explain other aspects of cognition and behavior that affect reading and writing, including:
(A) Attention;
(B) Executive function;
(C) Memory;
(D) Processing speed; and
(E)  Graphomotor control.
(c) Define and identify environmental, cultural, and social factors that contribute to literacy development, including:
(A) Language spoken at home;
(B) Language and literacy experiences; and
(D) Cultural values.
(d) Know and identify phases in the typical developmental progression of
(A) Oral language (semantic, syntactic, pragmatic)
(B) Phonological skill
(C) Printed word recognition
(D) Spelling
(E)  Reading fluency
(F) Reading comprehension; and
(G) Written expression.
(e) Understand and explain the known causal relationships among phonological skill, phonic decoding, spelling, accurate and automatic word recognition, text reading fluency, background knowledge, verbal reasoning skill, vocabulary, reading comprehension, and writing.
(f) Know and explain how the relationships among the major components of literacy development change with reading development.
(g) Know reasonable goals and expectations for learners at various stages of reading and writing development.
 
(9) Standard 2:  Structured Language Teaching:  Candidates demonstrate the ability to:
 
Phonology
 
(a) Identify the general and specific goals of phonological skill instruction.
(b) Know the progression of phonological skill development (i.e., rhyme, syllable, onset‐rime, phoneme differentiation);
(c) Identify the differences among various phonological manipulations, including identifying, matching, blending, segmenting, substituting, and deleting sounds."
(d) Understand the principles of phonological skill instruction: brief, multisensory, conceptual, and auditory‐verbal.
(e) Understand the reciprocal relationships among phonological processing, reading, spelling, and vocabulary.
(f) Understand the phonological features of a second language or dialect, such as Spanish, and how they may interfere with English pronunciation and phonics.
 
Phonics and Word Recognition
 
(g) Know or recognize how to order phonics concepts from easier to more difficult.
(h) Understand principles of explicit and direct teaching: model, lead, give guided practice, and review.
(i) State the rationale for multisensory and multimodal techniques.
(j) Know the routines of a complete lesson format, from the introduction of a word recognition concept to fluent application in meaningful reading and writing.
(k) Understand research‐based adaptations of instruction for students with weaknesses in working memory, attention, executive function, or processing speed.
 
Fluent, Automatic Reading of Text
 
(l) Understand the role of fluency in word recognition, oral reading, silent reading, comprehension of written discourse, and motivation to read.
(m) Understand reading fluency as a stage of normal reading development; as the primary symptom of some reading disorders; and as a consequence of practice and instruction.
(n) Define and identify examples of text at a student’s frustration, instructional, and independent reading level.
(o) Know sources of activities for building fluency in component reading skills.
(p) Know which instructional activities and approaches are most likely to improve fluency outcomes.
(q) Understand techniques to enhance student motivation to read.
(r) Understand appropriate uses of assistive technology for students with serious limitations in reading fluency.
 
Vocabulary
 
(s) Understand the role of vocabulary development and vocabulary knowledge in comprehension.
(t) Understand the role and characteristics of direct and indirect (contextual) methods of vocabulary instruction.
(u) Know varied techniques for vocabulary instruction before, during, and after reading.
(v) Understand that word knowledge is multifaceted.
(w) Understand the sources of wide differences in students’ vocabularies.
 
Text Comprehension
 
(x) Be familiar with teaching strategies that are appropriate before, during, and after reading and that promote reflective reading.
(y) Contrast the characteristics of major text genres, including narration, exposition, and argumentation.
(z) Understand the similarities and differences between written composition and text comprehension, and the usefulness of writing in building comprehension;
(aa) Identify in any text the phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs and “academic language” that could be a source of miscomprehension.
(bb) Understand levels of comprehension including the surface code, text base, and mental model (situation model).
(cc) Understand factors that contribute to deep comprehension, including background knowledge, vocabulary, verbal reasoning ability, knowledge of literary structures and conventions, and use of skills and strategies for close reading of text
 
Handwriting, Spelling and Written Expression  
 
Handwriting
(dd) Know research‐based principles for teaching letter naming and letter formation, both manuscript and cursive.
(ee) Know techniques for teaching handwriting fluency.
 
Spelling
(ff) Recognize and explain the relationship between transcription skills and written expression.
(gg) Identify students’ levels of spelling development and orthographic knowledge.
(hh) Recognize and explain the influences of phonological, orthographic, and morphemic knowledge on spelling.
 
Written Expression
(ii) Integrate basic skill instruction with composition in writing lessons. generation).
(jj) Know grade and developmental expectations for students’ writing in the following areas: mechanics and conventions of writing, composition, revision, and editing processes.
(kk) Understand appropriate uses of assistive technology in written expression.
 
(10) Standard 3: Interpretation and administration of assessments for planning instruction.  Candidates demonstrate the ability to understand:
(a) Level 1 Knowledge:
(A) Differences among screening, diagnostic, outcome, and progress monitoring assessments.
(B) Basic principles of test construction, including reliability, validity, and norm referencing, and know the most well‐validated screening tests designed to identify students at risk for reading difficulties; and
(C) Principles of progress‐monitoring and the use of graphs to indicate progress.
(b) Level 2 Knowledge:
(A) Level 1 knowledge as provided in subsection (10)(a) of this rule;
(B) Ranges of skills typically assessed by diagnostic surveys of phonological skills, decoding skills, oral reading skills, spelling, and writing;
(C) Content and purposes of the most common diagnostic tests used by psychologists and educational evaluators; and
(D) Measures of reading comprehension and written expression in relation to an individual child’s component profile.
 
(11) Standard 4: Knowledge of Dyslexia and Other Learning Disorders (IDA Standard E). Candidates demonstrate the ability to:
(a) Understand the most common intrinsic differences between good and poor readers, including cognitive, neurobiological, and linguistic differences;
(b) Recognize the tenants of a nationally-recognized definition of dyslexia;
(c) Recognize that dyslexia and other reading difficulties exist on a continuum of severity;
(d) Identify the distinguishing characteristics of dyslexia and related reading and learning disabilities, including:
(A) Developmental language comprehension disorder;
(B) Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder;
(C) Disorders of written expression or dysgraphia;
(D) Mathematics learning disorder; and
(E) Nonverbal learning disorders.
(e) Identify how symptoms of reading difficulty may change over time in response to development and instruction.
(f) Understand federal and state laws that pertain to learning disabilities, especially reading disabilities
and dyslexia.
 
584-420-0345 – PROPOSED AMENDED RULE (Bold text represents proposed amendments)
Elementary Education: Multiple Subjects Endorsement: Program Standards
(1) Candidates who are prepared for the Elementary Education: Multiple Subjects endorsement will demonstrate the knowledge, skills, professional dispositions and cultural competencies necessary to promote the academic, career, personal and social development of students in elementary education learning environments.
(2) The Commission may provide approval to an educator preparation program that prepares candidates for an Elementary Education: Multiple Subjects endorsement only if it includes:
(a) Instruction based on reading standards adopted by the Oregon Department of Education as provided in OAR 584-420-0015;
(b) Instruction related to dyslexia as provided in OAR 584-420-0016;
(f) (c) Field experiences that include supervised teaching or internships in elementary education classrooms;
(d) (d) A requirement for candidates to complete the Commission-approved test for Elementary-Multiple Subjects;
(e) (e) A requirement for candidates to complete a teacher performance assessment in accordance with OAR 584-017-1100 Teacher Candidate Performance Assessments if the candidate is being recommended for Preliminary Teaching License;
 (g) (f) Integration of principles of cultural competency and equitable practice in each competency standard through the entire Elementary Education: Multiple Subjects Endorsement program; and
(a) (g) Content that will enable candidates to gain the knowledge, skills, abilities, professional dispositions, and cultural competencies to meet the standards set forth in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.
(3) DEVELOPMENT, LEARNING, AND MOTIVATION. Standard 1: Development, Learning, and Motivation — Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students’ development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.
(4) CURRICULUM. Standard 2: Reading, Writing, and Oral Language — Candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.  
(5) Standard 3: Science — Candidates know, understand, and use fundamental concepts of physical, life, and earth/space sciences. Candidates can design and implement age-appropriate inquiry lessons to teach science, to build student understanding for personal and social applications, and to convey the nature of science;
(6) Standard 4: Mathematics — Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts and procedures that define number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis and probability. In doing so they consistently engage problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connections, and representation;
(7) Standard 5:  Social studies — Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies — the integrated study of history, geography, the social sciences, and other related areas — to promote elementary students’ abilities to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent world;
(8) Standard 6:  The arts — Candidates know, understand, and use — as appropriate to their own understanding and skills — the content, functions, and achievements of the performing arts (dance, music, theater) and the visual arts as primary media for communication, inquiry, and engagement among elementary students;
(9) Standard 7: Health education — Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts in the subject matter of health education to create opportunities for student development and practice of skills that contribute to good health;
(10) Standard 8: Physical education — Candidates know, understand, and use — as appropriate to their own understanding and skills—human movement and physical activity as central elements to foster active, healthy life styles and enhanced quality of life for elementary students.
(11) INSTRUCTION. Standard 9: Integrating and applying knowledge for instruction — Candidates plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community;
(12) Standard 10: Adaptation to diverse students — Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students;
(13) Standard 11: Development of critical thinking and problem solving — Candidates understand and use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students’ development of critical thinking and problem solving;
(14) Standard 12: Active engagement in learning — Candidates use their knowledge and understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior among students at the K–6 level to foster active engagement in learning, self-motivation, and positive social interaction and to create supportive learning environments;
(15) Standard 13: Communication to foster collaboration — Candidates use their knowledge and understanding of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the elementary classroom.
(16) ASSESSMENT. Standard 14: Assessment for instruction — Candidates know, understand, and use formal and informal assessment strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of each elementary student,
 
(17) PROFESSIONALISM, Standard 15: Professional growth, reflection, and evaluation — Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning; they continually evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally.
(18) Standard 16: Collaboration with families, colleagues, and community agencies—
Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.
Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495 & 342.553
Hist.:
 
584-420-0360 – PROPOSED AMENDED RULE (Bold text represents proposed changes.)
English for to Speakers of Other Languages Endorsement (ESOL): Program Standards
(1) Candidates who are prepared for the ESOL endorsement will demonstrate the knowledge, skills, professional dispositions and cultural competencies necessary to promote the academic, career, personal and social development of students in ESOL learning environments.
(2) The Commission may provide approval to an educator preparation program that prepares candidates for an ESOL endorsement only if it includes:
(a) Instruction based on reading standards adopted by the Oregon Department of Education as provided in OAR 584-420-0015;
(b) Instruction related to dyslexia as provided in OAR 584-420-0016;
(a) (c) Content that will enable candidates to gain the knowledge, skills, abilities, professional dispositions, and cultural competencies to meet the standards set forth in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook;
(b) (d) A requirement for students to complete the Commission-approved test for ESOL;
(c) (e) A requirement for students to complete a teacher performance assessment in accordance with OAR 584-017-1100 Teacher Candidate Performance Assessments if the candidate is being recommended for Preliminary Teaching License; and
(d) (f) Field experiences that include supervised teaching or internships in ESOL classrooms; and
(e) (g) Integration of principles of cultural competency and equitable practice in each competency standard through the entire ESOL endorsement program.
3) Standard 1: Language: Candidates demonstrate the ability to know, understand, and use the major concepts, theories, and research related to the nature and acquisition of language to construct learning environments that support English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and bilingual students' language and literacy development and content area achievement.
(4) Standard 2: Culture: Candidates demonstrate the ability to know, understand, and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to the nature and role of culture and cultural groups to construct learning environments that support ESOL and bilingual students' cultural identities, language and literacy development, and content area achievement.
(5) Standard 3: Planning, Implementing, and Managing Instruction: Candidates demonstrate the ability to know, understand, and use standards-based practices and strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing ESOL and content instruction, including classroom organization, teaching strategies for developing and integrating language skills, and choosing and adapting classroom resources.
(6) Standard 4: Assessment: Candidates understand issues of assessment and use standards-based assessment measures with ESOL and bilingual students.
(7) Standard 5: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the history of ESL teaching. Candidates demonstrate the ability to keep current with new instructional techniques, research results, advances in the ESL field, and public policy issues. Candidates demonstrate the ability to use such information to reflect upon and improve their instructional practices. Candidates demonstrate the ability to provide support and advocate for ESOL and bilingual students and their families and work collaboratively to improve the learning environment.
(8) Standard 6: Candidates demonstrate the ability to use information technology to enhance learning and to enhance personal and professional productivity.
Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495 & 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 13-2015(Temp), f. 11-13-15, cert. ef. 1-1-16 thru 6-28-16; TSPC 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-10-16
 
584-420-0440– PROPOSED AMENDED RULE (Bold text represents proposed changes.)
Reading Intervention: Program Standards
 
(1) Candidates who are prepared for the Reading Interventionist endorsement will demonstrate the knowledge, skills, professional dispositions and cultural competencies necessary to promote the academic, career, personal and social development of students in a reading invention learning environment.
(2) The Commission may provide approval to an educator preparation program that prepares candidates for a Reading Intervention endorsement only if it includes:
(a) Instruction based on reading standards adopted by the Oregon Department of Education as provided in OAR 584-420-0015;
(b) Instruction related to dyslexia as provided in OAR 584-420-0016;
(a)(c) Content that will enable candidates to gain the knowledge, skills, abilities, professional dispositions, and cultural competencies to meet the standards set forth in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook;
(a)( (d) A requirement for students to complete the Commission-approved test for Reading Intervention;
(b)( (e) A requirement for students to complete the edTPA teacher performance assessment if candidate is being recommended for the Preliminary Teaching License.
(c)( (f) Field experiences that include supervised teaching or internships in reading intervention learning environments; and
(d)( (g) Integration of principles of cultural competency and equitable practice in each competency standard through the entire Reading Intervention Endorsement program.
 
(3) Standard 1: Candidates demonstrate the knowledge and skills related to foundational reading knowledge and dispositions.
(4) Standard 2: Candidates demonstrate the knowledge and skills related to Instructional reading Strategies and Curriculum Materials.
 
(5) Standard 3: Candidates demonstrate the knowledge and skills related to reading assessment, diagnosis and evaluation.
 
(6) Standard 4: Candidates demonstrate the ability and understand the importance of creating a Literate Environment.
 
(7) Standard 5:  Candidates understand the importance on participation in professional development related to reading instructional skills. 
 
(8) Standard 6: Candidates demonstrate the ability to provide leadership, guidance and supervision of paraprofessionals.
 
Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120-ORS 342.143, ORS 342.153, ORS 342.165, & ORS 342.223-ORS 342.232
Hist.:
 
584-420-0460– PROPOSED AMENDED RULE (Bold text represents proposed changes.)
Special Education: Program Standards
(1) Candidates who are prepared for the Special Education endorsements will demonstrate the knowledge, skills, professional dispositions and cultural competencies necessary to promote the academic, career, personal and social development of students in the Special Education population.
(2) The Commission may provide approval to an educator preparation program or course of study that prepares candidates for a Special Education endorsement only if it includes:
(a) Instruction based on reading standards adopted by the Oregon Department of Education as provided in OAR 584-420-0015;
(b) Instruction related to dyslexia as provided in OAR 584-420-0016;
(c) (a) (c) Content that will enable candidates to gain the knowledge, skills, abilities, professional dispositions, and cultural competencies to meet the standards set forth in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook;
(b) (d) Instruction on dyslexia and that the instruction be consistent with the knowledge and practice standards of an international organization on dyslexia;
(c) (e) A requirement for students to complete the Commission-approved subject-matter test for Special Education;
(d) (f) Field experiences that include supervised teaching or internships in classroom environments with students who are “individuals with exceptionalities” across the full range of disabilities. Field and clinical experiences must be supervised by qualified professionals who are either licensed as special educators or eligible for licensure as special educators; and
(e) (g) Integration of principles of cultural competency, cultural responsive pedagogy and equitable practices are imbedded in each competency standard through the entire Special Education endorsement program.
(3) The Commission-approved elementary multiple subjects examination is not required to obtain the license. However, passage of the Commission-adopted Elementary-- Multiple Subjects examination is required in order for special educators licensed to teach general education content in grades prekindergarten through 8 (elementary teachers) and to meet the federal definition of “highly qualified” teacher under the Elementary/Secondary Education Act (ESEA).   
(4) (3) Standard 1: Candidates demonstrate the ability to understand how exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with exceptionalities.
(5) (4) Standard 2: Candidates demonstrate the ability to create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and self-determination
(6) (5) Standard 3: Candidates demonstrate the ability to use knowledge of general and specialized curricula to individualize learning for individuals with exceptionalities
(7) (6) Standard 4: Candidates demonstrate the ability to use multiple methods of assessment and data-sources in making educational decisions.
(8) (7) Standard 5: Candidates demonstrate the ability to select, adapt, and use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of individuals with exceptionalities.
(9) (8) Standard 6: Candidates demonstrate the ability to use foundational knowledge of the field and the their professional Ethical Principles and Practice Standards to inform special education practice, to engage in lifelong learning, and to advance the profession.
(10) (9) Standard 7: Candidates demonstrate the ability to collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, individuals with exceptionalities, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.
Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495 & 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 13-2015(Temp), f. 11-13-15, cert. ef. 1-1-16 thru 6-28-16; TSPC 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-10-16