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State Agency Program Partners

The Oregon Coastal Management Program (OCMP), consists of a network of agencies with authority in the coastal zone. State agencies are integral coastal program partners. They coordinate with each other to assist local governments, enforce state regulations, and carry out programs and state laws to protect coastal resources. The state agencies that make up the OCMP are listed below, along with simple descriptions of what areas each agency covers, information about their enforceable policies, staff and other contributions.

For a more global view of enforceable policies please see our Enforceable Policies page.

The Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) serves as the lead administrative agency of the OCMP. The primary authority for the coastal management program is the Oregon Land Use Planning Program and the 19 statewide planning goals.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for DLCD are included in ORS Chapters 92, 196, 197, 215, 227

There are 13 staff at DLCD who are allocated 100% to the coastal program.

OCMP Staff Directory

The Oregon Department of State Lands (DSL) has ownership and management responsibilities for submerged and submersible lands.

The Removal-Fill Law requires state permits for fill and removal in waterways up to the line of nonaquatic vegetation. The statute establishes an overall policy to assure that fill and removal do not interfere with the state’s interest to preserve the use of its waters for navigation, fishing and public recreation. DSL also administers the state statute requiring mitigation of intertidal dredging and filling by creation, restoration or enhancement of an estuarine area (ORS 541.626).

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for DSL are included in ORS Chapters 196, 273, 274

There are 16 staff at DSL who are allocated 5-30% to the coastal program.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) manages the Oregon Ocean Shore, as a perpetual public easement established by the Oregon Beach Bill.

OPRD regulates the ocean shore and beaches for public use and recreational access and issues permits for improvements on the ocean shore and for the removal of driftwood. OPRD also regulates vehicular and equestrian access to and along the ocean shore. As the state's lead agency for coastal access and recreation, OPRD manages the network of state parks, waysides, access points and botanical gardens that provide areas for recreation, research, and preservation of historic sites and unique natural areas. In the coastal zone, the Oregon Scenic Waterways Act protects scenic and environmental aspects of portions of the Rogue River and a small portion of the Illinois River.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for OPRD are included in ORS Chapter 390

There are 3 staff at OPRD who are allocated 68% to the coastal program.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) regulates the harvest of fish, shellfish, wildlife and marine invertebrates in the coastal zone. ODFW also manages refuges and marine reserves, conducts research related to species management and ocean acidification and hypoxia, and reviews land use plans and water use activities to assure protection of fish and wildlife habitat.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for ODFW are included in ORS Chapters 496, 498, 506, 509

There are 10 staff at ODFW who are allocated 5-15% to the coastal program.

The Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) supports the capacity of watershed councils and soil and water conservation districts so Oregon has an enduring, high capacity local infrastructure for conducting watershed restoration and conservation. OWEB Operating Capacity grants for watershed councils and Soil and Water Conservation Districts help fund costs such as staff, contractors and operating costs.

Watershed Council Capacity Grants

The Watershed Council Capacity Grants provide operating capacity support for Coastal Zone Watershed Councils - locally organized, voluntary, non-regulatory groups established to improve the condition of watersheds in their local area. Watershed councils bring varied interests together to form a common vision for the watershed, prioritize activities, and identify landowner participants for important projects. Many of the threatened or endangered salmonids inhabit coastal watersheds. However, many of the streams have impairments that limit the survival success of salmonids. Coastal Watershed Councils work to identify, prioritize, and develop restoration projects that strive to address limiting factors and aim to help salmon recovery through habitat restoration and enhancement.

Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) Capacity

Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) Capacity Grants provide funding to enable the capacity of coastal SWCDs to conduct business, and provide assistance to landowners and partners to conserve natural resources. This work is vital in protecting and improving Oregon's water quality. SWCD Capacity Grants Provide technical assistance and community engagement for the restoration and protection of native fish and wildlife, watersheds, and water quality through implementation of Agricultural Water Quality Management Area Plans and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

There are no OCMP enforceable policies related to OWEB

There are no staff at OWRD allocated to OCMP, however there are about 20 Watershed Council and 16 SWCD capacity grants per biennium in the coastal zone that are reported to NOAA as part of the OCMP.

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers air, water, land and noise pollution control programs, regulates sewage treatment and disposal systems and solid waste disposal sites, and manages solid waste control programs, including control of environmentally hazardous wastes. DEQ also administers coastal non-point pollution programs and emergency response planning for spills.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for DEQ are included in ORS Chapters 454, 465, 466, 468, 468A, 468B

There is 1 staff member at DEQ who is allocated 100% to the coastal program.

Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) carries out policies and programs for the use and conservation of surface and groundwater resources, issues permits for the appropriation of surface and groundwater resources, issues permits for the appropriation of water and for dams, and coordinates water basin programs with plans. The agency has the authority to establish minimum stream flows and to designate critical groundwater areas and regulate water withdrawal.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for OWRD are included in ORS Chapters 536, 537, 543

There are no staff at OWRD allocated to OCMP.

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) produces maps and reports that can be used by the public or government to reduce the loss of life and property due to geologic hazards and to manage geologic resources, including water. DOGAMI is lead regulator for geologic resources (oil; gas; geothermal energy; metallic and industrial minerals; and sand, gravel, and crushed stone). These authorities include the issuance of permits for wells below submerged lands.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for DOGAMI are included in ORS Chapters 517, 520

There are no staff at DOGAMI allocated to OCMP.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) ensures that Oregon food products are safe to eat. ODA provides consumer protection and promotes economic development and expanded markets for Oregon agricultural products. ODA also advocates for protection of the natural resource base.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for ODA are included in ORS Chapters 564, 622.

There are no staff at ODA allocated to OCMP.

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) administers the Forest practices Act which establishes policies and standards for forest management and harvest practices. The agency also manages state forests and other state-owned forest lands.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for ODF are included in ORS Chapters 527.

There are no staff at ODF allocated to OCMP.

The Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) regulates the siting of energy facilities, and provides general guidance on the suitability or unsuitability of locations for power plants in Oregon. ODOE also has preemptive authority over other state and local authorities to approve site certificates for new energy facilities, and issues certificates for transmission lines larger than 230 KV.

Enforceable Policies and Staff

Enforceable policies for ODF are included in ORS Chapters 469.

OCMP includes no staff at ODOE.

Program Partner Contacts

OCMP Staff Directory

Contact

Patty Snow
Oregon Coastal Management Program Manager
patty.snow@state.or.us
Phone: 503-934-0052

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