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  • Oregon Commission on Black Affairs
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    The Commission on Black Affairs is authorized under ORS 185.410 to work for the implementation and establishment of economic, social, legal and political equality for Oregon's African American and Black populations.
Oregon's Commission on Black Affairs Programs & Resources
Oregon's Commission on Black Affairs was created to be a link between Oregon's African Americans, Blacks, and Oregon government. In 1980, Former Governor Vic Atiyeh created the commission. Three years later, the Oregon Legislative Assembly's vote made it a statutory commission. The goal was to improve communication between the state legislature, The Governor, and Oregon's African Americans and Blacks, to involve more African American and Blacks in policy making and program planning.

 
 
 

 
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OCBA's Call to Action on recent racist incidents in Oregon
OCBA/ODE Responding to Disproportionate Discipline with Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practices Slide deck and Report by Layan Ammouri, OCBA's Public Policy Research Intern

Read the Oregon Advocacy Commissions' Joint statement in support of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

 
Disproprotionate Discipline in Oregon Schools Phase II: Restorative Justice Report and Restorative Justice Powerpont by Brian Allard, OCBA Public Policy Research Intern
 
Correcting the Disparity Report Powerpoint by Nita Kumar, OCBA Public Policy Research Intern
 
Disproportionate Discipline in Oregon Schools Phase I:
OCBA partnered with the Oregon Dept of Education's School Discipline Advisory Committee and the Governor's Office of Diversity & Inclusion on a joint law externship on racial disparity in student discipline law in OregonView Willamette University College of Law extern Jacqueline Leung's presentation here.
Read Ms. Leung's final white paper on racial disparity.

 

 
 
Intern Wes Garcia's Findings and Final Report on Oregon Hate Crime Laws
 
Wes Garcia, Willamette University College of Law student recently completed his internship with the Oregon Advocacy Commissions.
This internship was created in a joint venture by the Oregon Commission on Hispanic Affairs (OCHA), Oregon Commission on Black Affairs (OCBA), Oregon Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs (OCAPIA), the Oregon Department of Justice, Oregon Advocacy Commission, and supervised by Professor Carrasco at Willamette. The purpose of this position was to look at Oregon hate crime laws and compare them to other states’ laws and federal statues for possible improvements.
 
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