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SPR 783

Truck Parking: An Emerging Safety Hazard to Highway Users

Project Coordinator:
 Josh Roll
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Sal Hernandez
Start Date for ODOT:
 August 18, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 30, 2017

 

Overview:

It is nationally recognized that commercial motor vehicle operators often cannot find adequate and safe parking for rest purposes. This is especially true for Oregon, where high-use corridor rest areas are experiencing a heavy demand for truck parking, one that exceeds capacity. These rest areas are intended for short-term safety breaks, yet they are increasingly used for long-term parking. Private truck stops are also experiencing capacity shortfalls. The economic recovery and driver hour-of-service regulations have recently contributed to the rising demand. Winter weather conditions are another factor that adds to the demand of truck parking facilities. Recent studies performed by Pahukula and Hernandez (2014) and Islam and Hernandez (2013) have shown factors related to weather and fatigue increase the injury severity level potential of commercial motor vehicle involved crashes.
 
Because of the truck parking shortages and limits on stays in public rest areas (Oregon Administrative Rule 734-030-0010 allows a vehicle to remain in a rest area for up to 12 hours in a 24-hour period), commercial motor vehicle operators may be contributing to unsafe situations by driving without a needed short break and/or by parking on roadway access ramps, shoulders, at highway interchanges and on facilities running through cities and towns. Oregon law, ORS 811.550 prohibits parking on a throughway, yet enforcement of illegal truck parking has been low priority for Oregon State Police and other Oregon law enforcement officers. This problem is expected to become an increasing hazard as freight movement by truck is forecast to increase about 70% (tonnage) by year 2035.

 

​​Truck Parking: An Emerging Safety Hazard to Highway Users Work Plan

 

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 784

Development of Titanium Seismic Retrofits for Deficient Concrete Columns

Project Coordinator:
 Matthew Mabey
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Chris Higgins
Start Date for ODOT:
 December 1, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 January 31, 2018

 

Overview:

Hundreds of bridges in the Oregon bridge inventory are supported on seismically deficient reinforced concrete columns. Reinforced concrete (RC) columns designed prior to the mid-1970’s have details which make them susceptible to premature failure during earthquakes. In particular, lap splices and widely spaced transverse reinforcement are insufficient to develop and maintain strength under repeated loading. Splices are typically located just above the footing elevation in hinge regions where there is significant ductility demand. Transverse reinforcement is often too widely spaced and insufficient to adequately confine the core area, prevent buckling of the longitudinal reinforcement within the flexural hinge region, and provide sufficient shear strength. These deficiencies have led engineers and researchers to develop different retrofitting methodologies to improve their seismic performance.
This research will evaluate new retrofit methods are proposed which employ a novel use of continuous spirals of a high-strength titanium alloy bars, supplemental longitudinal titanium alloy bars, and are combined with low shrinkage concrete or grout to externally protect nonductile rectangular RC columns.
 

Development of Titanium Seismic Retrofits for Deficient Concrete Columns Work Plan

 

Latest Quarterly Report Link

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SPR 785

Adjusting Asphalt Mixes for Increased Durability and Implementation of a Tester to Evaluate Fatigue Cracking of Asphalt Concrete

Project Coordinator:
 Norris Shippen
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Erdem Coleri
Start Date for ODOT:
 October 1,2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 30, 2017

 

Overview:

Asphalt concrete fatigue cracking has been accepted to be a major distress mode in Oregon. ODOT’s Pavement Management system has shown that mixes placed in the last 20 years have had a tendency to develop premature cracking after 6 to 8 years of service life before reaching the structural design life of 15 years. The widespread nature of this distress would suggest that it is an issue with the way mix is designed and produced and not a specific project related problem. Thus, current test methods and design guidelines should be modified and improved to be able to develop more durable asphalt mixtures with longer service lives. In order to determine the most feasible test method and analysis protocol to be used in district and contractor laboratories in Oregon, accuracy, precision, time, cost, efficiency, and practicality of different cracking tests should be evaluated.

Adjusting Asphalt Mixes for Increased Durability and Implementation of a Tester to Evaluate Fatigue Cracking of Asphalt Concrete Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 786

Enhancing Landslide Inventorying, LiDAR Hazard Assessment and Asset Management

Project Coordinator:
Kira Glover-Cutter 
Research Agency:
Oregon State University/Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries 
Principal Investigator:
Ben Leshchinsky/Michael Olsen/William Burns
Start Date for ODOT:
 September 2, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 January 30, 2018

 

Overview:

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) requires states to inspect and inventory federal-aid highway system bridges every two years. These bridge inspections are important for assessing the safety of a bridge and are done by qualified structural inspectors, typically at an arm’s length from the inspection point(s). However, as stated in the FHWA Bridge Inspector’s Reference Manual, “[b]ridge inspection is inherently dangerous.” In order to access and view necessary bridge elements, inspectors are often required to stand in vehicles that are costly to mobilize and at times dangerous, including platform trucks, bucket trucks, or under-bridge inspection vehicles. Some inspections require extensive climbing or use of rescue boats. In addition to the danger to the inspector and vehicle operator, road users also face danger as traffic lanes on bridges are closed or reduced during inspections. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the capabilities and limitations of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology for use in visual structural inspections. This research addresses ODOT’s core values: enhancing transportation and employee safety, and improving the reliability of Oregon’s transportation system. UAV technology has great potential to provide a cost-effective and safe method for remotely performing preliminary visual inspections.  

 

Enhancing Landslide Inventorying, LiDAR Hazard Assessment and Asset Management Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 787

Eyes in the Sky: Bridge Inspections with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Project Coordinator:
 Xiugang (Joe) Li
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Daniel Gillins/Christopher Parrish
Start Date for ODOT:
 October 1, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 January 30, 2018

 

Overview:

UAVs are capable of flying a pre-loaded path and can carry digital cameras and other sensors. They are excellent for accessing spots that are dangerous or hard to reach by humans without the use of specialized climbing equipment.  During flights, operators can view live video from the camera to determine areas that may need detailed inspection. Digital photographs from onboard cameras can be processed, mosaicked, georeferenced, and converted into 3D  point clouds for analyses.
 
Because of the rapid emergence of UAV-related technology in recent years, there is growing interest in the feasibility of inspecting structures with UAVs. For example, Hallerman and Morgenthal (2013) concluded that UAVs can be effective for inspecting industrial chimneys and historical buildings. Sa et al. (2015) investigated the use of a UAV for inspecting poles. Ellenberg et al. (2014), and Eschmann et al. (2013) showed that UAV imagery can be used to detect cracks and other defects in structural elements.
 
Because of low flight costs, UAVs can also be flown regularly to monitor ground and structural changes. For instance, Hallerman et al. (2014) showed that imagery from a UAV can be used to monitor deformations along dams and arth retaining walls.
 
Although some very recent work has been published on the feasibility of using UAVs for some structural inspections, much more work is needed if DOTs intend to implement UAVs in their bridge inspection programs. First, this project aims to test and evaluate the effectiveness of inspecting bridges (and, as discussed below, wireless communication towers) with UAVs. To date, no peer-reviewed papers have been found on inspecting these types of structures with UAVs. Second, a cost-benefit analysis will be provided on using UAVs for inspecting these structures as compared with conventional inspection methods. Third, this project will give practical recommendations on how to best and safely perform UAV inspections.Recommendations will include how to best plan a flight mission and set the camera acquisition parameters.
 

Eyes in the Sky: Bridge Inspections with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Work Plan

 

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SPR 788

Performance-Based Planning and Decision Making - Understanding Mode Choices

Project Coordinator:
 Tony Knudson
Research Agency:
 Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
 Liming Wang/Jennifer Dill
Start Date for ODOT:
 October 1, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 February 28, 2017

 

Overview:

Performance-based planning helps us to understand the potential impacts of decisions we make, supporting cost-effective investments and policy choices that we know can help us achieve our goals.In addition, it can enable monitoring of progress and facilitate needed adjustments, help us to communicate to the public, and assist us with meeting federal regulations and the intent of MAP21.ODOT has successfully developed a process for and applied performance-based planning in statewide and regional scenario planning efforts. These efforts have led to significant interest by regions and locals to integrate the process and tool ODOT developed into other planning and decision-making efforts. Additionally, ODOT planning is using the tool to help quantify modal and topic plan visions and policies and better communicate the anticipated benefits in ways seeming to resonate well with stakeholders and elected officials. As popularity for using the tool and process grow, there is recognition that a deeper understanding is needed to determine how mode choices and mode share may be impacted by policy and investment decisions. This is particularly important when starting to apply the tool in a broader base of planning and decision-making processes to truly understand what may be the best decisions for the entire transportation system (multimodal and intermodal).
 
Research is needed to understand how traveler’s mode choices may change in response to different policy and investment decisions. As an example, we have a good sense of how household vehicle miles traveled (VMT) is likely to change in response to policies like pricing, but we do not currently have the ability to estimate what effect that might have on travel by other modes, and how household mobility/accessibility might be affected. Placing ODOTs performance-based planning process in a multimodal context would enable ODOT, regions, and locals to cost-effectively deliver a transportation system that best achieves respective goals and to integrate what is learned from the research into existing tools.

 

Performance-Based Planning and Decision Making - Understanding Mode Choices Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 789

Improved Safety and Efficiency of Protected/Permitted Right Turns in Oregon

Project Coordinator:
 Mark Joerger
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University/Portland State   University
Principal Investigator:
 David Hurwitz/Chris Monsere
Start Date for ODOT:
 September 8, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 August 31, 2017

 

Overview:

The design of phasing schemes at signalized intersections are complex multifaceted transportation engineering problems. Right-turn operations place a significant challenge to engineers attempting to develop optimal phasing solutions for safety and efficiency. There is a surprising absence of specific guidance at the national and state level on how phasing alternatives should be selected, and how they compare in terms of operational and safety performance. Available documents such as the Traffic Signal Timing Manual (FHWA, 2008) or the ODOT Traffic Signal Policy and Guidelines (ODOT, 2013) are excellent resources, but critical questions remain with regard to what in-situ conditions: turning volumes (vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians), vehicle classifications, lane configurations (single receiving lane for both right turns and conflicting lefts), and gap profiles warrant protected/permitted right turns.Turning vehicles are the primary collision risk for non-motorized users and when these turning movements need to be controlled directly, proper driver response to traffic control is critical.
 
The challenge of designing the phasing schemes for protected/permitted right turns in Oregon has been widely identified by local traffic signal experts, presenting an opportunity for a research-based solution. Staff members from ODOT, Washington County, Clackamas County, the City of Salem, and several other agencies have been participating in an ad hoc collaboration to identify and document issues, and have determined that the gaps in the existing knowledge necessitate new research. This need has intensified with the recent allowance of the Flashing Yellow Arrow (FYA) to indicate a permitted right turn (MUTCD, 2009). While traffic engineers have a good understanding of driver comprehension and response to the circular green ball or a solid green arrow for right turning movements, significant questions remain regarding the FYA for right turn movements, as well as driver responses to the solid red arrow in Oregon.

 

Improved Safety and Efficiency of Protected/Permitted Right Turns in Oregon Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Reports Link

  

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SPR 790

Work Zone Intrusion Alert Technologies: Assessment and Practical Guidance

Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 John Gambatese
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 27, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 March 31, 2017

 

Overview:

Roadway construction and maintenance operations commonly require workers to conduct their work in close proximity to ongoing traffic. Short-term work zones (WZs) on high speed roads often involve working adjacent to passing vehicles separated by only a line of traffic markers. This worksite condition presents significant safety risk for both the workers and passing motorists. Inattentive or speeding drivers, careless workers, misplaced drums, and hazardousroadway conditions can lead to crashes and ultimately WZ injuries and fatalities. Other factors that can cause an increase in WZ crashes include: increase in nighttime work; lack of consistency of WZs; distracted drivers; and increase in vehicle miles travelled.
 
New technologies are publicly available that alert workers of work area intrusions. Prior work zone safety studies conducted by ODOT did not target work area intrusions and the technologies available to warn of intrusions. Literature is available from the device manufacturers that describes the specifications of each individual technology; however no studies have been found that provide a comprehensive review and comparison of the available technologies and present recommendations for their use in practice. Objective evaluation is needed that addresses the capabilities and effectiveness of the technologies, ease of use, viable application conditions (e.g., short-term/long-term work zone; stationary/mobile operation; and nighttime/daytime shift), and current cost and feasibility of implementation.

 

Work Zone Intrusion Alert Technologies: Assessment and Practical Guidance Work Plans

Latest Quarterly Reports Link

 

 

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SPR 791

Use of Additional Lighting for Traffic Control and Speed Reduction in Work Zones

Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 John Gambatese
Start Date for ODOT:
 September 4, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 30, 2017

 

Overview:

Much of the construction work that occurs on high-speed roadways takes place at night, exposing workers to hazards that are not present or as great during the daytime (e.g., impaired drivers, lack of sufficient lighting, and icy conditions at night). As a result, special measures are taken during nighttime work to protect workers and motorists in work zones, including workers wearing reflective clothing, flaggers using lighted STOP/SLOW paddles, and the use of illuminated signs for traffic control. Working at night also requires illuminating the work area. Construction crews typically employ light towers, balloon lights, or other lighting systems in order to see and conduct their work. The actual type of lighting system used depends on various factors such as the amount of light needed and the nature of the work operation (e.g., stationary or mobile, and short- or long-term). FHWA and OSHA publish standards for the minimum and recommended lighting in work areas.
 
The potentially positive impact that work area lighting can have on vehicle speeds is promising for safety in other areas of a work zone. A work zone may extend for several miles. Adding lighting to areas where the paver and typical work area lighting are currently not present may be a low cost means of making motorists more aware of workers on the roadway, reducing vehicle speeds throughout the work zone, and further protecting workers on the roadway.

 

Use of Additional Lighting for Traffic Control and Speed Reduction in Work Zones Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 792

Construction of Efficient, Cost-Effective and Sustainable Maintenance Facilities

Project Coordinator:
 Josh Roll
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Jason Ideker/Karl Haapala
Start Date for ODOT:
 October 26, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 August 30, 2017

 

Overview:

There are approximately 89 maintenance stations within ODOT, and a large assortment of other sheds, storage, and support buildings.Many of these maintenance stations are old, beyond their life expectancy, inefficient, or functionally obsolete (unable to accommodate larger-size, modern equipment). There is an urgent need to systematically replace these buildings to support the agency maintenance mission.A typical maintenance station can cost up to $8-$9 million, representing a significant capital cost burden over the next several years.A new maintenance station recently constructed in Sisters became the first in Oregon to incorporate renewable energy – in the form of geothermal heating and solar water heating.Even more sustainable and cost-effective solutions could have potentially been accomplished by utilizing high performance design practices, sustainably produced materials, increased insulation, more efficient lighting, water-saving techniques, waste reductions, etc.1-4The goal of this research is to document and provide such information for ODOT decision makers to make the most efficient use of the funding for maintenance station buildings.

 

Construction of Efficient, Cost-Effective and Sustainable Maintenance Facilities Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 793

Safety Assessment of Freeway Active Traffic Management by Exploring the Relationship between Safety, Congestion and Weather

Project Coordinator:
 Tony Knudson
Research Agency:
 Oregon Department of Transportation
Principal Investigator:
 Xiugang (Joe) Li
Start Date for ODOT:
 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 September 30, 2018

 

Overview:

The goal of this project is to evaluate the effectiveness of ATMS featuring VAS components (similar to being installed on OR 217 (urban) and US 26/OR 35 (rural/mountain)) specifically for real-time safety improvements. The real-time safety evaluations will provide the groundwork for future implementations of ATMS and VAS systems across the state.

 

Improving Safety, Mobility, and Reliability by Exploring the Relationship between Freeway Congestion and Safety Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

   

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SPR 794

Multi-Modal Intersections: Resolving Conflicts Between Trains, Motor Vehicles, Bicyclists and Pedestrians

Project Coordinator:
 Xiugang (Joe) Li
Research Agency:
 University of Washington
Principle Investigator:
 Anne Goodchild
Start Date for ODOT:
 December 29, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 30, 2017

 

OVERVIEW:

Increased cycling rates, rail shipments, and the establishment of multi-use paths has led to numerous complex and unsafe intersections where road, rail, and multiuse paths intersect. These intersections present safety hazards and must be addressed.

 

Multi-Modal Intersections: Resolving Conflicts Between Trains, Motor Vehicles, Bicyclists and Pedestrians Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

   

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SPR 797

Binder-Grade Bumping and High Binder Content to Improve Performance of RAP-RAS Mixtures

Project Coordinator:
 Norris Shippen
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Erdem Coleri
Start Date for ODOT:
 November 16, 2015
Completion Date for ODOT:
 June 30, 2017

 

OVERVIEW:

General reduction in pavement program funding levels over the past decade and the possible consequent increase in pavement road roughness within the next couple years created a need for low cost yet effective alternative ways to rehabilitate, preserve and maintain roadway network in Oregon.Recycling highway construction materials and minimizing the use of virgin materials can reduce the pavement life cycle costs, improve highway network condition, conserve natural resources, and protect the environment. Although the recycling of asphalt pavements is beneficial in most cases by reducing the need for virgin materials and construction costs, asphalt pavements with high recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled asphalt shingle (RAS) contents should be carefully designed to avoid premature cracking (West et al., 2013, NCHRP 752). The use of binder-grade bumping and high virgin binder content were determined to be effective in improving cracking performance. Increased crack resistance allows the use of higher RAP/RAS contents. While these two strategies generally increase the cost of virgin binder used in the asphalt mixture, increased RAP/RAS content and improved RAP/RAS performance will reduce the overall life-cycle cost of recycled asphalt concrete material used in construction. Mechanistic-empirical (ME) pavement design methods and aboratory testing need to be combined with different modeling methods to investigate the performance benefits of using binder-grade bumping and high binder content in RAP/RAS mixtures.

 

Binder-Grade Bumping and High Binder Content to Improve Performance of RAP-RAS Mixtures Work Plan

 Latest Quarterly Report Link

  

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SPR 798

Assessing Highway System Impacts on Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Watersheds Uning the Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model (SELDM)
 
Project Coordinator:
 Kira Glover-Cutter
Research Agency:
 USGS
Principal Investigator:
 John Risley
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 1, 2016
Completion Date for ODOT:
 July 31, 2017
 
Overview:
 
The proposed study has three primary objectives:
1. Develop and demonstrate techniques for geographic analysis that use the roadway and land use/land cover information in Streamstats to apply SELDM at selected points in the watershed. These techniques will include manual and batch-processing techniques that can be used to help model contributions of flows, concentrations and loads of stormwater from
highway sites and other upstream land uses. These techniques will be used to do massbalance analyses in selected watersheds with SELDM based on the land use/cover percentages upstream of any selected highway site.
 
2. Demonstrate methods for using SELDM with statistics on the quantity and quality of runoff from highways and other land uses and BMP treatment statistics to model the cumulative effects of runoff from different areas at different points in a stream basin. These techniques can be used by ODOT to help identify the application of mitigation measures to maximize benefits, while minimizing potential effects of runoff on receiving streams within a watershed, minimizing costs for implementing stormwater BMPs.
 
3. Create guidance for watershed-scale analyses using SELDM that are based on results and experience learned in the second objective and document this information in at least one report.
 
 
Latest Quarterly Report Link
 
 
 
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SPR 799

Lidar for Maintenance of Pavement Reflective Markings and Retro-Reflective Signs

Project Coordinator:
 Jon Lazarus
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Michael Olsen/Chris Parrish
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 1, 2016
Completion Date for ODOT:
 November 30, 2018

 

Overview:
Recent research has investigated the potential use of mobile lidar for retro-reflectivity evaluation [Olsen et al., 2013; Ai and Tsai, 2016]. While this work appears promising, detailed studies are needed to assess the operational feasibility of these methods for state DOTs and to develop production-ready procedures. Additionally, since some aspects of the lidar intensity calibration are specific to a
particular system and configuration, it is important to modify and test these procedures using data directly from ODOT’s system.
 
In light of these research needs, this study seeks to:
-Develop a model for retro-reflectivity and radiometric calibration for ODOT’s mobile lidar system.
-Generate a set of quality control metrics for pavement marking and sign retro-reflectivity based on information derived from mobile lidar data
-Establish procedures for creating GIS data layers from the output of the above steps to support decision making by supervisors and integrate analysis results into ODOT’s overall workflows.

 

Lidar for Maintenance of Pavement Reflective Markings and Retro-Reflective Signs Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

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SPR 800

Quantifying the Performance of Low-Noise Rumble Strips

Project Coordinator:
 Mark Joerger
Research Agency:
 
Principal Investigator:
 
Start Date for ODOT:
 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 

 

Overview:

The proposed study will evaluate the feasibility of using sinusoidal as a substitute for traditional
milled rumble strips on highway segments with lane departure crash problems. A quantitative
and empirical comparison of the in-vehicle noises and vibrations and roadside noises of
sinusoidal and traditional rumble strips will give an indication as to whether the sinusoidal
pattern can potentially be used as a substitute for the traditional pattern in areas with lane crash
problems.

Quantifying the Performance of Low-Noise Rumble Strips Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

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SPR 801

Employing IRLPD Test Methods for Optimal Asphalt Mixture Performance

Project Coordinator:
 
Research Agency:
 
Principal Investigator:
 
Start Date for ODOT:
 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 

 

Overview:

A new testing methodology called incremental Repeated Load Permanent Deformation (iRLPD)
has been developed. The optimal design concept would prevent making the mixtures too stiff.
The iRLPD tests may be utilized to determine how much a mixture can be stiffened before it
loses its durability and become vulnerable to cracking. The objective of the research is to
develop an optimal design tool to be used to modify mix design when the quality of RAP
changes during the production so that the mixture remains within the acceptable performance
range.

Employing IRLPD Test Methods for Optimal Asphalt Mixture Performance Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

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SPR 802

Seismic Performance Design Criteria for Bridge Bent Plastic Hinge Regions

Project Coordinator:
 Matthew Mabey
Research Agency:
 
Principal Investigator:
 
Start Date for ODOT:
 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 

 

Overview:

The main objective of this research is to quantify the steel and concrete strain limits to be used
for the seismic assessment of bridge bents considering the operational performance design
criteria of existing reinforced concrete bridge bents. Multi-column bents are typical for bridges in
Oregon and are therefore more representative of the need to gather performance related data. The
proposed research is for experimentally evaluating large-scale reinforced concrete subassemblies
representing critical parts of the bents. These primarily represent column-to-crossbeam and
column-to-foundation aspects of the bent. Of key interest from the experiments are the
monitoring of material strains and deformations as the column reaches target seismic
performance levels.

Seismic Performance Design Criteria for Bridge Bent Plastic Hinge Regions Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

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SPR 803

Statewide Data Standards to Support Current and Future Strategic Public Transit Investment

Project Coordinator:
 Josh Roll
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 David Porter
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 17, 2016
Completion Date for ODOT:
 December 31, 2017

 

Overview:

The goal of this research project is to develop a public transit ridership data standard for all Oregon public transit agencies to follow for the purposes of improved data collection, storing, sharing, reporting, and analysis. These core functionalities of the standard will be supported with the development of open-source, web-based tools for use by transit agencies, ODOT, regional planners, modelers, and vendors.

Statewide Data Standards to Support Current and Future Strategic Public Transit Investment Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link


 

 

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SPR 804

A Method to Estimate Annual Average Daily Traffic for Minor Facilities for Map-21 Reporting and Statewide Safety Analysis

Project Coordinator:
 Tony Knudson
Research Agency:
 Portland State University
Principal Investigator:
 Avinash Unnikrishnan/Miguel Figliozzi
Start Date for ODOT:
 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 

 

Overview:

This research will develop and recommend practical methods to estimate AADT for minor roads to meet MAP-21 and FAST reporting requirements and a statewide evaluation for safety. This research may benefit from a previous research project, SPR 756 “Improved Safety Performance Functions for Signalized Intersections,” completed in August 2015. SPR 756 devised methods to estimate minor road traffic volumes used for intersection-related crash analysis.


The objectives of this project are to: (i) identify data needs for estimating missing AADT information, (ii) develop a cost-effective method to estimate AADT for minor facilities across the state of Oregon, regardless of jurisdictional ownership, (iii) conduct a pilot demonstration of the method to estimate missing AADT information in ODOT Region 2, and (iv) analyze the performance of the method and provide recommendations on future research directions and potential data collection efforts.

A Method to Estimate Annual Average Daily Traffic for Minor Facilities for Map-21 Reporting and Statewide Safety Analysis Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 805

Performance of High Strength Steel Reinforcement in Shear Friction Applications

Project Coordinator:
 
Research Agency:
 
Principal Investigator:
 
Start Date for ODOT:
 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 

 

Overview:

The objective of this research is to evaluate and define the performance of A706 Grade 80,
ASTM A615 Grade 100, and ASTM A1035 (120 ksi) reinforcing steel performance in shear
friction applications. Understanding the performance is crucial for evaluating and assessing the
applicability of the current design equations for RC structures using HSS reinforcement. If
successful, the research will provide necessary data for supporting a recent working agenda item
(WAI) presented to the AASHTO-T10 committee by Oregon DOT.

Performance of High Strength Steel Reinforcement in Shear Friction Applications Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 806

Compliance and Surrogate Safety Measures for Uncontrolled Crosswalks in Oregon

Project Coordinator:
 
Research Agency:
 
Principal Investigator:
 
Start Date for ODOT:
 
Completion Date for ODOT:
 

 

Overview:

The objective of this research is to analyze, as robustly as possible, the effectiveness of field
measurements and surrogate safety measures to develop a proactive approach to evaluate
crosswalk safety performance. The proposed research aims to answer these questions: (i) Can
surrogate safety measures be used as a reliable predictor of a crosswalk expected safety
performance? (ii) Is it possible to utilize field-based surrogate safety measures as a tool to
examine the need of crosswalk improvements?

Compliance and Surrogate Safety Measures for Uncontrolled Crosswalks in Oregon Work Plan

Latest Quarterly Report Link

 

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SPR 807

Coastal Landslide and Bluff Retreat Monitoring for Climate Change Adaptation and Targeted Risk Assessment

Project Coordinator:
 Kira Glover-Cutter
Research Agency:
 Oregon State University
Principal Investigator:
 Michael Olsen/Ben Leshchinsky
Start Date for ODOT:
 July 1, 2016
Completion Date for ODOT:
 July 31, 2024

 

Overview:

The goal of this research for ODOT is to develop a more comprehensive data-driven framework
for prioritizing coastal asset management. This is new research for ODOT, building upon recent
smaller-scale, foundational efforts and recommendations. The objectives of this project are to:

1) Evaluate five representative sites reflecting a combination of coastal geologic
terrains, landslide types, and coastal bluff erosion activities.
2) Determine current geotechnical and hydrological data, as well as landslide and bluff
geometry and movement using traditional and advanced 3D technologies (lidar and realtime
remote in-place MEMS sensors).
3) Quantify changes in landslide movement, groundwater change, and bluff erosion rates
over an extended 7 year timeline to fully capture the episodic nature of sea cliff erosion
in the context of climate change events.
4) Develop GIS/LiDAR based management framework for targeted risk assessment and
climate change adaptation planning including guidelines for future evaluations of
coastal infrastructure sites.
 
 
Latest Quarterly Report Link
 

 

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