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Properties Recently Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Full text nominations for Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the last six months can be found below. If a property is not listed below, please contact Tracy Collis at (503) 986-0690 or Tracy.Collis@oregon.gov for an electronic or paper copy. 
 
A complete list of inventoried and National Register-listed properties is available online through the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

  

Cameo Theatre, Yamhill County, Newberg, Listed October 22, 2018
The Cameo Theatre represents Newberg’s association with the Golden Age of Hollywood and is the city’s first theatre built with a sound system for talking pictures. Since construction in 1937, the theatre has been an important role as a primary form of entertainment in Newberg’s community. The property is also significant for its Art Deco and Streamline Moderne architectural features.  The Golden Age of Hollywood is defined by a shift in theatre construction and design, transitioning from elaborate movie “palaces” situated in large cities to more modest designs applied to talking picture single-screen cinemas in smaller towns and communities. The Cameo Theatre’s Art Deco and Streamline Moderne style is representative of theatre design commonly applied during the Golden Age of Hollywood and the building is the only Art Deco/Streamline Moderne style building in the city of Newberg.  The Cameo Theater is located in downtown Newberg, an Oregon Main Street Network community. Oregon Main Street works with communities to develop comprehensive, incremental revitalization strategies based on a community’s unique assets, character, and heritage.

 
--> Download the Cameo Theatre nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Bernard & Emma Goldsmith House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed October 25, 2018
The Bernard and Emma Goldsmith House was designed by architect Edgar Marks Lazarus and exemplifies the distinctive characteristics of the Shingle Style architecture in Portland. The Goldsmith House, completed in 1892 for businessman and Portland's first Jewish mayor Bernard Goldsmith and his family, is the best example known from the peak of Lazarus's 1890s Shingle Style residences. The Shingle Style is an evolution of the Queen Anne, with reduced ornament and fewer materials. A tamer version of the Queen Anne, the Shingle Style incorporates asymmetrical forms, wide porches, rounded turrets, and strong rooflines.
Emma Goldsmith was a prominent figure in the Jewish community in Portland, Oregon. She was a member of the Ladies Hebrew Benevolent Society, established in May 1875. Although a society for women, it was initially presided by men. That was until 1880, when Emma Goldsmith became the first female president. Bernard Goldsmith was a Jewish immigrant from Weddenburg, Germany, arriving in New York City in 1848. Trained at his family's jewelry store in New York, Goldsmith took his entrepreneurial spirit and interest in jewelry out west during the Gold Rush in the 1850s. He created a jewelry company and opened general stores between California and Oregon, eventually settling in Portland in 1861. Edgar Lazarus began practicing in the state of Oregon in 1890 as a residential architect. His earliest domestic work is recognized for bringing the Shingle Style to Portland. Lazarus later evolved into a civic architect, his work influenced by the Arts & Crafts, Richardsonian, and Jugendstil styles, and arguably his most famous commission was the Vista House on the Historic Columbia River Highway.

 

--> Download the Bernard & Emma Goldsmith House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead, Washington Co, Hillsoboro vicinity, Listed July 6. 2018

The 1890 Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead is located in the heart of the original Edward and Brazilla Constable “Five Oaks” donation land claim (DLC), approximately 3.3 miles northeast of downtown Hillsboro. The Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead is locally significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture as an excellent and increasingly rare example of a late 19th-early 20th century farmstead within the immediate vicinity of the City of Hillsboro (within the current Urban Growth Boundary) which has maintained good integrity of setting, location, design, association, materials, workmanship and feeling. The house, reflecting the typical cross-wing form of the late-nineteenth century farmhouse combined with Classical and Queen Anne stylistic ornamentation popular at the time, indicates the somewhat elevated economic status of the Shutes, mostly due to the diversified income developed by Shute. The barn is a largely intact, fine example of an early twentieth century hay and livestock barn, and the garage is an almost completely intact, purpose-built pre-1920 automobile storage building. Together, the farm buildings well represent the last identified collection of primary farm buildings of a late-nineteenth and early twentieth century farmstead within the UGB around Hillsboro, and is increasingly rare in the larger vicinity around the city. The period of significance is 1890-1919, beginning with the year of construction of the original portion of the house and ending with the construction of the garage, the last building of the farmstead.

 

--> Download the Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Dr. Robert R. and Mary Helen Mooers House, Douglas Co, Roseburg, Listed June 25, 2018

The Dr. Robert R. and Mary Helen Mooers House, constructed in 1959, is a single-story, side-gabled mid-century modern residence. It was designed by architects Raymond Kermit Thompson and Polly Povey Thompson, combining elements of the popular Ranch Style with design elements associated with the architect-driven Contemporary Style, and demonstrating the influence of the Northwest Regional style. The house is locally significant under Criterion C, in the area of Architecture and its period of significance is 1959, the date of construction of the house. The Mooers House is significant as an outstanding example of the blending of the form and spatial arrangement of the widely popular Ranch Style with several elements of the architect-driven Contemporary style, and incorporating several design elements generally associated with Northwest Regionalism, a design approach developed by prominent architects working in the unique climate and setting of the Pacific Northwest. The house is unique in Roseburg, a city long dominated by extractive industries and other blue collar pursuits. While the Ranch house was the ubiquitous building block that populated most post-war neighborhoods, including several in Roseburg, the Contemporary style and Northwest Regionalist approaches were generally the realm of professional architects, and, due to the challenges associated with funding construction of non-traditional forms through the Federal Housing Administration, generally not suited to construction at the neighborhood scale.

 

--> Download the Dr. Robert R. and Mary Helen Mooers House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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John B. Wennerberg Barn, Yamhill Co, Carlton, Listed June 25, 2018
Located slightly to the south of downtown Carlton, the John B. Wennerberg Barn is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places as locally significant under Criterion A in the area of Agriculture, for its associations with late 19th and early 20th century commercial agricultural practices in Yamhill County, Oregon. Built by John Wennerberg c. 1895, the Wennerberg Barn was first used a part of his commercial farm. This period of use ends with the sale of the Wennerberg Barn and the surrounding property to Adelbert Brooks’ Carlton Nursery Company in 1919. Though alterations to the barn over time have obscured evidence of Wennerberg’s use of the barn as part of his commercial farming operation, the barn’s architecture and Wennerberg’s letters to his brother Daniel suggest a traditional agricultural use. The three-aisled, end-opening barn’s design, as well as the remnant notches in the crossbeams and posts of the ground-level aisles convey the Barn’s use for housing livestock and storing grain. The voluminous second-level hayloft was clearly designed for storing hay, and the existence of a high central beam suggests the use of a mechanical hayfork during Wennerberg’s period of ownership. In addition to this remaining physical evidence, letters sent from Wennerberg to his younger brother Daniel detail the older Wennerberg brother’s farming operations in Carlton. The letters suggest that John Wennerberg farmed hay for sale in addition to growing grains such as wheat, barley and oats, and raising hogs and sheep. The second farming operation to use the Wennerberg Barn was the Carlton Nursery Company (1919-1936). The Company used the building as a warehouse and distribution center for its horticultural products while they operated in northern Yamhill County. This second period of use begins with Brooks’ purchase of the property and ends when the Company moved its growing and shipping operations to Forest Grove, Washington County, OR in 1936. Following Wennerberg’s death in 1918, the property was purchased by Adelbert D. Brooks, who along with his brother Frank, owned and operated the Carlton Nursery Company. In 1919, the Carlton Nursery moved its packing and shipping operations from a nearby warehouse on Pine Street to the Wennerberg Barn. The barn was used until 1936 as the Carlton Nursery’s packing and distribution center for the stock grown on the Company’s primary nursery to the east of Carlton near Lafayette. These years were significant to the Carlton Nursery Company as it grew from a state and regional distributor of a variety of agricultural and horticultural products to a company that sold its products to markets nationwide.

--> Download the John B. Wennerberg Barn nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Lewis C. and Emma Thompson House, Yamhill Co, Carlton vcty, Listed May 11, 2018
Constructed ca. 1892, the Lewis C. and Emma Thompson house is located in unincorporated Yamhill County on land once part of Glenbrook Farm. While three generations of the Thompson family are associated with the listed property, it was Lewis C. Thompson, a farmer and businessman, and his wife Emma, who stylistically revised this house. The couple incorporated Craftsman Style features onto the house’s initial Stick Style design, resulting in a replacement of the old style with the new. Significantly, the Thompson house represents the transition from nineteenth century Victorian era design motifs, which focused on verticality, applied ornamentation, and complex rooflines, to the early-twentieth century modern approach to residential design, which focused on horizontality, open floorplans, and ornamentation that revealed and celebrated structural elements. This change is well captured in the Thompson House and is a stark representation of one of the greatest shifts in American domestic architectural history.

--> Download the Lewis C. and Emma Thompson House nomination [pdf]

-->  View the record in the Historic sites Database [link]
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Spring Valley School, Polk County, Zena, Listed February 9, 2018
Built in 1907, the Spring Valley School is a rectangular, one-story building of wood frame construction that is located at the foot of the Eola Hills, approximately 9 miles NW of Salem, Oregon. One-room school houses were often one of the first public buildings constructed in pioneer settlements. They were treasured by the local residents not only for their educational value but many times also for providing a gathering place for the entire community, children and adults. The Spring Valley School/Community Center has served both of these historic needs for over 100 years, from the original source of education beginning in 1907 to 1952 and then as a neighborhood gathering location up to the current time. Very few alterations have occurred since it ceased being used as a school house. The building is still largely a showcase of the original purpose and for the architectural style that was common at the time it was built.

--> Download the Spring Valley School nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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