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Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds - 2009-2011 Biennial Report
2009-2011 Oregon Plan Biennial Report Executive Summary Document
This is the eighth report on the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds. It provides an update on the accomplishments and continuing efforts of people throughout Oregon to improve and protect clean water and recover and maintain healthy populations of fish and wildlife.
 
Executive Summary (PDF) provides a high level look at issues, describes OWEB Board observations and recommendations, and describes key accomplishments of partners and teams.
Additional online content:
Agency Actions
Voluntary Restoration
Monitoring 
Science Oversight
Basin Reports
Data Sources, Acronyms, and Credits (PDF)
 

Oregon Plan Overview
The Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds is an initiative where all Oregonians can join to help restore healthy watersheds that support the economy and quality of life of Oregon. The Oregon Plan has four elements with success depending on strong implementation of all elements:
  • Voluntary restoration actions by private landowners - individuals and industry, rural and urban - with support from citizen groups, businesses, and local government.
  • Coordinated state and federal agency and tribal actions to support private and voluntary restoration efforts, effectively implement regulatory programs, soundly manage public land, and promote public education and awareness about watersheds and salmon.
  • Monitoring watershed health, water quality, and salmon recovery to document existing conditions, track changes, and determine the impact of programs and actions.
  • Scientific oversight by the Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team, an independent panel of scientists who evaluate the plan’s effectiveness, identify needed changes, and guide research investments.
 
More information about the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds can be found on the Oregon Plan web site
 

Oregon Plan Restoration Investments and Outcomes (2008 and 2009)
Every two years, the Oregon Plan Biennial Report tallies the amount of funding and restoration outcomes for the previous two calendar years.  The 2009-2011 Report contains the results of restoration activities completed and reported in 2008 and 2009.

   
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The amount of funding reported for restoration projects under the Oregon Plan has tripled since 1997. In 1997-1998, the total funding for completed and reported restoration projects from state, federal, and other sources was nearly $48 million. In 2008-2009, total funding was over $151 million.  The graphics showing the amount of funding reported statewide are contained in the Executive Summary.
 
This data comes from the Oregon Watershed Restoration Inventory (OWRI), the Federal Interagency Restoration Database, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Screening and Passage Program Database.  The OWRI was established in 1995 to track completed restoration work across Oregon. Except for projects funded by OWEB or implemented under certain permits, all reporting to this database is voluntary.
 

Online Tools
Want to view detailed information about restoration projects in Oregon? 
 
The Oregon Watershed Restoration Tool shows the locations of completed restoration projects in Oregon from several data sources including the Oregon Watershed Restoration Inventory (OWRI).  
 
Want to learn about OWEB investments across the state?
 
The OWEB Investment Tracking Tool is a new tool that allows exploration of OWEB grant funding distribution across the state.  The tool provides basic information on grants in progress and those that have been completed (e.g. project name, start year, OWEB funding amount).  The tool lets you view OWEB grant information on a map by watershed, grant type, county, or year.  An address can also be entered to view projects funded in a specific area or neighborhood.
 
Want to view fish habitat improvements made over the last ten years?
 
The Fish Passage Viewer portrays stream habitat made accessible to salmon, in addition to other species of native fish and wildlife, after a decade of fish passage improvement actions, as reported to OWRI in the John Day basin and Coos sub-basin.
 

Contact Information
Greg Sieglitz, Monitoring and Reporting Program Manager
Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board
(503) 986-0194