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Laurelhurst Historic District

Proposed Laurelhurst Historic District, Portland, Multnomah County

This page describes what a historic district is, the listing process, and the benefits and responsibilities of owning a listed property. Use the links below to navigate to specific information.
 

 Recent Updates to the Proposed Laurelhurst Historic District

On October 19, 2018, the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP) recommended to forward the proposed Laurelhurst Historic District nomination to the National Park Service for listing following several revisions.

On January 17, 2019, the State Historic Preservation Office completed the review of the Laurelhurst Historic District nomination and prepared the nomination materials to send to the National Park Service (NPS). However, in light of the partial Federal shutdown then in effect, the nomination was prepared, but not sent, under concern around delivery and handling of nominations while the NPS was closed.

On January 28, 2019, upon being advised that the NPS was reopened, the nomination package was sent to the NPS. Upon receipt of the nomination and entry into the Federal Register, the NPS reviewers will have 45 days to review the nomination and determine whether to list the nominated property.


On March 18, 2019, the National Park Service listed the Laurelhurst Historic District in the National Register of Historic Places.

 
 

What is the Laurelhurst Historic District?

The National Register of Historic Places is the Nation’s official list of buildings, districts, structures, sites, and objects important to local, state, or national history. The program is run by the National Park Service in Washington DC and administered locally by the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), an office of the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Department.
A historic district is an area or neighborhood that has a concentration of buildings and associated landscape and streetscape features that are at least 50 years old or older. To be eligible for listing in the Register, the majority of the buildings in the district must maintain their historic appearance, or be “contributing,” and the district must be associated with an important aspect of the area’s history and/or be notable for its architecture or design.
 ​
The Laurelhurst Neighborhood Association (LNA) initiated the Laurelhurst Historic District. LNA made a public request for proposals  in July 2017 and awarded Peter Meijer Architect, PC (PMA) a contract to write the historic district nomination document. PMA completed a survey of the neighborhood in April 2018 that identified the properties to be included in the nomination and finalized the project in July 2018. A draft nomination for the district was submitted to the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) on July 2, 2018 for consideration at the October 19, 2018 meeting of the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation.

The Laurelhurst Historic District is located within the boundaries of the City of Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. The approximately 392-acre district is a residential neighborhood located thirty-two city blocks east of the Willamette River. The District boundaries form an irregular shape whose outside boundaries are generally located on the north by NE Multnomah and NE Senate Streets; the east by NE 44th Avenue and SE 44th Avenue; on the south by SE Stark Street; and on the west by SE 32nd Avenue and NE 33rd Avenue. The District comprises 1,751 properties constructed between 1910 and 1987, consisting of 1,315 contributing buildings, four (4) contributing sites, seven (7) contributing objects, 436 noncontributing buildings, and six (6) buildings and one (1) site already listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 
The Laurelhurst Historic District is eligible for listing in the National Register as a local example of community planning & development and for its notable architecture. The district is significant as Portland's only residential subdivision illustrating both fashionable City Beautiful-era planning principles and for its representation of popular trends in United States domestic architecture between the 1910s and the 1940s.

A full copy of the draft nomination and accompanying Laurelhurst Historic District map can be downloaded by clicking on the following links.

 
View the National Register nomination [pdf]


The nomination draft is being made through the cover document "Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960" Multiple Property Document (MPD). This document provides extensive contextural information relevant to the history of residential suburb development across the United States. An MPD is a background document that is used to evaluate the National Register eligibility of related property. For a copy of that document, please click on the following link.

View the Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960 Multiple Property Document [pdf]


Audio Recording of the October 2018 Meeting of the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation

Due to the size of the audio recording of the SACHP discussion for the proposed Laurelhurst  Historic District, the audio recording can be downloaded through a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) site.

Instructions for accessing the FTP site
Copy and paste ftp://159.121.119.151 into your browser address bar (Note: If you are using Windows Explorer, view the FTP site as a Windows Explorer page. Do this by selecting “Page” from the menu bar in the browser, then selecting “Open FTP site in Windows Explorer”)

When a dialog box appears, use the following information to log in:

Login:shpoguest
Password: welcome
(login and password are case sensitive)

Double-click on “Outgoing” and download the entire folder named Laurelhurst Historic District. Once the folder opens, click on the file to download. Do this by “copying” the entire folder and then “pasting” it to your desktop.
 

Project Timeline and Important Dates

March 18, 2019 - the National Park Service listed the Laurelhurst Historic District in the National Register of Historic Places.
 
March 2019 - Expected date that the National Park Service will make a final decision regarding listing the proposed Laurelhurst Historic District in the National Register.

January 28, 2019 - SHPO is notified by the National Park Service staff that the National Park Service has reopened. SHPO sends the prepared nomination package by 2-day air mail, per its customary practice.

January 17, 2019 - The State Historic Preservation Office prepared the nomination for submission to the National Park Service but due to the partial federal government shutdown, held the nomination until the National Park Service reopened.

January 4, 2019 - Requested last day to submit notarized objections to the Oregon SHPO for the proposed historic district. Any notarized objection received after this date will be forwarded to the National Park Service before they make a final decision.

December 22, 2018 - The National Park Service closes, as part of the partial federal government shutdown.

October 19, 2018 - The SACHP reviewed the nomination document for the proposed Laurelhurst Historic District. The meeting occurred at the Laurelhurst Club, 3721 SE Ankeny Street, Portland, beginning at 2:00 p.m. View the SACHP agenda [pdf]​ At the meeting, the SACHP recommended to forward the proposed Laurelhurst Historic District nomination to the National Park Service following several revisions. An audio recording of the meeting will be posted soon.

Meeting Minutes

October 8, 2018 - Portland Landmarks Commission reviews the nomination document for the proposed Laurelhurst Historic District. The meeting will take place at 1900 SW 4th Avenue, Room 2500A, at 1:30 p.m. The agenda is available on the Bureau of Development Services’ webpage, ​https://www.portlandoregon.gov/BDS/article/588140


August 30, 2018
- Oregon SHPO staff host informational meeting at the All Saints Parish, 3847 NE Glisan Street, from 5pm-7pm.

August 19, 2018 - Public comment period opens. See below for more information on how to submit comments. 
 
July 2018 – National Register of Historic Places nomination submitted to SHPO for consideration at October 2018 SACHP meeting.
 

How do I Support or Object to Listing the District in the National Register?

Private property owners holding fee-simple absolute title to real property within the historic district may object to listing a district in the National Register by submitting a notarized statement to the SHPO certifying that the individual is the sole or partial owner of the property and that they object to the listing. The proposed district will not be listed if a majority of the property owners object.

Each owner of private property in a district has one opportunity to object regardless of how many properties or what part of the one property that individual owns, and regardless of whether the property contributes to the historic significance of the proposed district. An owner is defined as an individual or legal entity under Oregon State law holding fee simple absolute title to real property within the district. Per federal rules, objections by divisions of government, including schools and fire districts are not counted toward the total needed to prevent listing a district in the National Register.

The opportunity to object is described more fully in the federal regulations, Chapter 36 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 60.  A link to these regulations may be found at: https://www.nps.gov/nr/regulations.htm
 
The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) provides the following forms as a courtesy. Owners are not required to use SHPO forms in order to object or withdraw an objection. 
 
Objection Form [pdf]
 
Withdrawal Form [pdf]
 
Multiple Signature Addendum Form [pdf]
 
Original signed and notarized objections must be mailed to:

 
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department
State Historic Preservation Office
Laurelhurst Historic District
725 Summer Street NE, Suite C
Salem, OR 97301

We request that all notarized objections be submitted to our office no later than January 4, 2019 in order for them to be included with the nomination materials forwarded to the National Park Service. Any notarized objection received after this date will be forwarded to the National Park Service before they make a final decision.

 
Letters of support and comments from interested parties are welcome, and may be submitted by email to ORSHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oregon.gov or by regular mail to the address listed above.
 

How Does the National Register Nomination Process Work?

Any person or organization can nominate a property or district for listing in the National Register of Historic Places by submitting a nomination to the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). A complete nomination for a historic district includes the nomination form, property list, maps, photos, and exhibits. Once received, SHPO staff reviews the document for completeness, and then provides the preparer with a memo, if needed, outlining required changes to meet the minimum standards set by the National Park Service and making suggestions to improve the document.
 
Nominations that meet the minimum standards are forwarded to the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP), a nine member, governor-appointed body of citizens with expertise in fields relating to historic preservation. The nomination document is also provided to the local government for comment.
 
At its meeting, the SACHP considers comments by local officials, staff, and interested citizens and recommends to the SHPO and the National Park Service to accept or reject a property or district for listing in the National Register, or defer the nomination for future consideration. Only the National Park Service can list a property in the Register.
 

What Does Listing in the National Register Mean?

Owners of properties listed in the National Register choosing to take advantage of federal and state tax benefits and grant programs must comply with federal standards. Oregon State law requires local governments to review proposals to demolish or relocate properties listed in the National Register. ​Local governments have the authority to form local historic districts and landmarks, and may also create additional protections for properties listed in the National Register through a separate local process.

To find out more about how your local government may regulate National Register listed properties, please contact the local planning office at: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bds/35881

View the SHPO National Register webpage that describes in more detail the benefits and restrictions of owning a property​ listed in the National Register and the listing process here:
 
http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/NATREG/pages/nrhp_results.aspx

 

Questions About the Information on this Page?

Robert Olguin, National Register Program Coordinator
State Historic Preservation Office
Phone: (503) 986-0668
Email: robert.olguin@oregon.gov
 

Questions About Portland's Land-Use Regulations?

Brandon Spencer-Hartle, Historic Resources Program Manager
City of Portland, Bureau of Planning and Sustainability
Phone: (503) 823-4641
Email: brandon.spencer@portlandoregon.gov