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Properties Recently Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Full text nominations for Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the last six months can be found below. If a property is not listed below, please contact Tracy Collis at (503) 986-0690 or Tracy.Collis@oregon.gov for an electronic or paper copy. 
 
A complete list of inventoried and National Register-listed properties is available online through the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead, Washington Co, Hillsobor vicinity, Listed July 6. 2018

The 1890 Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead is located in the heart of the original Edward and Brazilla Constable “Five Oaks” donation land claim (DLC), approximately 3.3 miles northeast of downtown Hillsboro. The Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead is locally significant under Criterion C in the area of Architecture as an excellent and increasingly rare example of a late 19th-early 20th century farmstead within the immediate vicinity of the City of Hillsboro (within the current Urban Growth Boundary) which has maintained good integrity of setting, location, design, association, materials, workmanship and feeling. The house, reflecting the typical cross-wing form of the late-nineteenth century farmhouse combined with Classical and Queen Anne stylistic ornamentation popular at the time, indicates the somewhat elevated economic status of the Shutes, mostly due to the diversified income developed by Shute. The barn is a largely intact, fine example of an early twentieth century hay and livestock barn, and the garage is an almost completely intact, purpose-built pre-1920 automobile storage building. Together, the farm buildings well represent the last identified collection of primary farm buildings of a late-nineteenth and early twentieth century farmstead within the UGB around Hillsboro, and is increasingly rare in the larger vicinity around the city. The period of significance is 1890-1919, beginning with the year of construction of the original portion of the house and ending with the construction of the garage, the last building of the farmstead.

 

--> Download the Shute-Meierjurgen Farmstead nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Dr. Robert R. and Mary Helen Mooers House, Douglas Co, Roseburg, Listed June 25, 2018

The Dr. Robert R. and Mary Helen Mooers House, constructed in 1959, is a single-story, side-gabled mid-century modern residence. It was designed by architects Raymond Kermit Thompson and Polly Povey Thompson, combining elements of the popular Ranch Style with design elements associated with the architect-driven Contemporary Style, and demonstrating the influence of the Northwest Regional style. The house is locally significant under Criterion C, in the area of Architecture and its period of significance is 1959, the date of construction of the house. The Mooers House is significant as an outstanding example of the blending of the form and spatial arrangement of the widely popular Ranch Style with several elements of the architect-driven Contemporary style, and incorporating several design elements generally associated with Northwest Regionalism, a design approach developed by prominent architects working in the unique climate and setting of the Pacific Northwest. The house is unique in Roseburg, a city long dominated by extractive industries and other blue collar pursuits. While the Ranch house was the ubiquitous building block that populated most post-war neighborhoods, including several in Roseburg, the Contemporary style and Northwest Regionalist approaches were generally the realm of professional architects, and, due to the challenges associated with funding construction of non-traditional forms through the Federal Housing Administration, generally not suited to construction at the neighborhood scale.

 

--> Download the Dr. Robert R. and Mary Helen Mooers House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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John B. Wennerberg Barn, Yamhill Co, Carlton, Listed June 25, 2018
Located slightly to the south of downtown Carlton, the John B. Wennerberg Barn is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places as locally significant under Criterion A in the area of Agriculture, for its associations with late 19th and early 20th century commercial agricultural practices in Yamhill County, Oregon. Built by John Wennerberg c. 1895, the Wennerberg Barn was first used a part of his commercial farm. This period of use ends with the sale of the Wennerberg Barn and the surrounding property to Adelbert Brooks’ Carlton Nursery Company in 1919. Though alterations to the barn over time have obscured evidence of Wennerberg’s use of the barn as part of his commercial farming operation, the barn’s architecture and Wennerberg’s letters to his brother Daniel suggest a traditional agricultural use. The three-aisled, end-opening barn’s design, as well as the remnant notches in the crossbeams and posts of the ground-level aisles convey the Barn’s use for housing livestock and storing grain. The voluminous second-level hayloft was clearly designed for storing hay, and the existence of a high central beam suggests the use of a mechanical hayfork during Wennerberg’s period of ownership. In addition to this remaining physical evidence, letters sent from Wennerberg to his younger brother Daniel detail the older Wennerberg brother’s farming operations in Carlton. The letters suggest that John Wennerberg farmed hay for sale in addition to growing grains such as wheat, barley and oats, and raising hogs and sheep. The second farming operation to use the Wennerberg Barn was the Carlton Nursery Company (1919-1936). The Company used the building as a warehouse and distribution center for its horticultural products while they operated in northern Yamhill County. This second period of use begins with Brooks’ purchase of the property and ends when the Company moved its growing and shipping operations to Forest Grove, Washington County, OR in 1936. Following Wennerberg’s death in 1918, the property was purchased by Adelbert D. Brooks, who along with his brother Frank, owned and operated the Carlton Nursery Company. In 1919, the Carlton Nursery moved its packing and shipping operations from a nearby warehouse on Pine Street to the Wennerberg Barn. The barn was used until 1936 as the Carlton Nursery’s packing and distribution center for the stock grown on the Company’s primary nursery to the east of Carlton near Lafayette. These years were significant to the Carlton Nursery Company as it grew from a state and regional distributor of a variety of agricultural and horticultural products to a company that sold its products to markets nationwide.

--> Download the John B. Wennerberg Barn nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Lewis C. and Emma Thompson House, Yamhill Co, Carlton vcty, Listed May 11, 2018
Constructed ca. 1892, the Lewis C. and Emma Thompson house is located in unincorporated Yamhill County on land once part of Glenbrook Farm. While three generations of the Thompson family are associated with the listed property, it was Lewis C. Thompson, a farmer and businessman, and his wife Emma, who stylistically revised this house. The couple incorporated Craftsman Style features onto the house’s initial Stick Style design, resulting in a replacement of the old style with the new. Significantly, the Thompson house represents the transition from nineteenth century Victorian era design motifs, which focused on verticality, applied ornamentation, and complex rooflines, to the early-twentieth century modern approach to residential design, which focused on horizontality, open floorplans, and ornamentation that revealed and celebrated structural elements. This change is well captured in the Thompson House and is a stark representation of one of the greatest shifts in American domestic architectural history.

--> Download the Lewis C. and Emma Thompson House nomination [pdf]

-->  View the record in the Historic sites Database [link]
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Spring Valley School, Polk County, Zena, Listed February 9, 2018
Built in 1907, the Spring Valley School is a rectangular, one-story building of wood frame construction that is located at the foot of the Eola Hills, approximately 9 miles NW of Salem, Oregon. One-room school houses were often one of the first public buildings constructed in pioneer settlements. They were treasured by the local residents not only for their educational value but many times also for providing a gathering place for the entire community, children and adults. The Spring Valley School/Community Center has served both of these historic needs for over 100 years, from the original source of education beginning in 1907 to 1952 and then as a neighborhood gathering location up to the current time. Very few alterations have occurred since it ceased being used as a school house. The building is still largely a showcase of the original purpose and for the architectural style that was common at the time it was built.

--> Download the Spring Valley School nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Reed-Cobb-Bowser House & Barn, Josephine County, Merlin, Listed October 30, 2017

The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House and Barn is located on Merlin Road in the unincorporated town of Merlin, approximately seven miles northwest of Grants Pass, in rural Josephine County. Built in 1910-11, the 2-1/2 story Craftsman-style house is associated with early 20th century movement in many parts of western Oregon to promote residential-agricultural development on relatively small, usually 5 to 10-acre parcels. In 1909, a group of wealthy investors led by brothers William T. and Franklin E. Reed began purchasing property around Merlin for the purpose of both speculating on the land itself and fostering the development of an orchard economy in the area. The Reed-Cobb-Bowser House was originally built in 1910-11 as the headquarters and clubhouse for what became known as the Country Club Orchard development, as well as the residence of William T. Reed’s daughters, Grace and Marian Reed. Though initially successful, the project soon faltered, and by the early 1920s, undeveloped land began to be sold off to satisfy debt. The house remained in the ownership of William T. Reed, who, upon his death in 1924, passed ownership to Marian and Grace. Grace lived in the house with her husband, Everett Cobb until 1936, when the house was sold to miner Heber E. Bowser and his wife, Clementine, the wealthy heiress of Portland family wealth. Clementine, in addition to owning and managing several successful mines in the area, was also a well-known equestrian, and is responsible for the large and well-appointed horse barn that accompanies the house on the National Register. In addition to its association with the events of local development, the house is also recognized as an exceptional example of the Craftsman style of architecture, widely popular across the United States during the early 20th century. 

--> Download the Reed-Cobb-Bowser House & Barn nomination [pdf]
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Peacock Lane Historic District, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed October 30, 2017

Peacock Lane, a small, distinctive neighborhood comprising 32 residences located between SE Stark and SE Belmont Streets, in place of SE 40th Avenue in the east Portland grid. It was developed as a small, planned community between 1923 and 1930 by Richard Fleming Wassell, real estate developer and designer of most of the houses in the district. The district is well-known throughout the City of Portland for its collection of uniquely unified residential architecture, all of which reflect Tudor Revival and English Cottage styles based on medieval European precedents. The Peacock Lane Historic District is listed in the National Register of Historic Places for its unified architectural design language, and for its early accommodation of the automobile, most notably demonstrated by the inclusion of attached and detached garages on every property. In addition to these features, for which the district was listed through the Multiple Property Submission, “Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830-1960,” the district is widely recognized for its highly-anticipated annual Christmas Lights display, which draws thousands of visitors to the district during the holiday season.

--> Download the Peacock Lane Historic District nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Redmond Downtown Historic District, Deschutes County, Redmond,
Listed October 30, 2017

The Redmond Downtown Historic District embraces the historic commercial core of Redmond, including 43 downtown buildings located primarily along SW 6th Street roughly between SW Forest Avenue and SW Cascade Avenue.  The historic district reflects the period of economic and commercial growth in Redmond between 1910 and 1960, beginning with the years shortly after the founding of the city, when the earliest remaining downtown buildings were constructed, up through the end of major expansion in the post-World War II era. During this period, the population of Redmond expanded from 216 in 1910 to 3,340 in 1960. Architecturally, the district demonstrates the continuity of dominant design styles during the pre-war period of the twentieth century, including Colonial Revival, Classical Revival, Art Deco, and Streamlined Moderne styles, and extending to the early post-war architectural styles, in particular, the International Style.

--> Download the Redmond Downtown Historic District nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Foster-Simmons House, Lane County, Eugene, Listed October 30, 2017
The Foster-Simmons House, located at 417 E 13th Avenue, in the West University neighborhood of Eugene, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as an excellent, nearly intact example of the Craftsman style of residential architecture. It was built for $3000 in 1913 by attorney Orla H. Foster and his wife, Maidee, who lived in the house until 1921, when it was sold to Earl C. Simmons, owner of the E.C. Simmons Ford Dealership. After passing through a series of short-term owners, the house was offered for rent to University students beginning during the 1930s. From the 1940s until 1975, the home was owned and occupied by Mabel and Elroy Reagan. Since 1975, the house has been the home of the Eugene chapter of Young Life, a Christian youth support and development organization. The three-bedroom house displays many characteristic features of the Craftsman style, including varied exterior siding and window types, open eaves, a projecting front porch with heavy concrete piers and exposed structural elements, and a modest porte cochere. Interior elements include an open floor plan, built-in features, and an abundance of simple but elegant woodwork. The house retains a high degree of interior and exterior integrity, and clearly conveys its style and period of construction through its original form, features, and materials. As one of only six single-family Craftsman dwellings in the fragile West University area that have been evaluated as being National Register-eligible, the Foster-Simmons House is a stand-out example of its type in the neighborhood and in Eugene.

--> Download the Foster-Simmons House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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