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Properties Recently Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Full text nominations for Oregon properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places within the last six months can be found below. If a property is not listed below, please contact Tracy Collis at (503) 986-0690 or Tracy.Collis@oregon.gov for an electronic or paper copy. 
 
A complete list of inventoried and National Register-listed properties is available online through the Oregon Historic Sites Database.

  

Beauchamp Building, Marion County, Stayton, Listed November 1, 2019
The Beauchamp Building is one of several pre-cast concrete block buildings in Stayton constructed on the west side of 3rd Avenue between 1908 and 1916. Nine pre-cast concrete block buildings from this period still exist along a three-block portion of 3rd Avenue in Stayton’s downtown. The Beauchamp is the only building in Stayton to be all plain-face pre-cast concrete block.
Originally built to house a pharmacy, a specialty store and a dancehall, the Beauchamp building anchored and helped define Stayton’s business district and movement of the downtown core to the north, and aided in the commercial ascendency of Stayton from a village to a town. Clarence Albirto Beauchamp graduated from Willamette University in Salem, Oregon and became a pharmacist. C.A. Beauchamp and Louise Sommers of Scio married in 1908. In 1913, C.A. and Louise Beauchamp, at the ages of 33 and 29 respectively, took their dreams, their hobbies and a thriving pharmacy business and created a new building to house them, the Beauchamp Building. Louise Beauchamp started as a pharmacy clerk in 1908 and became an assistant pharmacist in 1928. In the early 1900s only two percent of pharmacists were women and most of these women worked in hospital pharmacies. Women in the retail environment were rare and even discouraged up and through the 1930s, and Louise’s story plays an important part of Stayton’s Commerce history.

--> Download the Beauchamp Building nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Roy E. & Hildur L. Amundsen House, Multnomah County, Gresham, Listed July 15, 2019
The Amundsen House was designed by Harold Amundsen for his parents, Roy E. and Hildur Amundsen, when he was a student at the University of Oregon. Built in 1961, the Amundsen House is locally significant for its architecture as an excellent, intact example of a Wrightian-styled, architect-designed residence in Gresham’s Northwest Neighborhood. The house displays many distinctive characteristics of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian designs in its small size, slab-on-grade foundation with radiant floor heat, horizontal emphasis, natural ornamentation, use of floor-to-ceiling glass windows, central hearth, and minimal ornamentation. The Amundsen House has had only three owners since its design and construction. The house has retained its original materials and it has not been adversely altered from its original design. Necessary repairs have been sensitive to the house’s design, and the largest alteration to the building was the addition of a slight pitch to the roofline, which is not visible from the right of way. The Roy E. and Hildur L. Amundsen House is an excellent example of the type and is remarkably intact and unaltered.

--> Download the Roy E. and Hildur L. Amundsen House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Databse [link]
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Kiernan House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 18, 2019
The Kiernan House was nominated as a rare survivor of Portland’s Pioneer past and is one of only three Italianate single-family houses built before 1870 that remain in Portland. When the house was built on the southwestern edge of Portland, the area was relatively rural and surrounded by the wooded hillsides to the south and west. As the downtown grew, that area became home to many of the city’s working class and the homes constructed around the Kiernan House were single and multi-family houses large and small. The Kiernan House was also nominated for its architectural significance as a representation of Italian Villa architecture. The house is a one-story building with flush tongue-and-groove board siding, segmental-arched windows, and porch and eave details. The earliest image of this house comes from an 1879 map of Portland that shows a similar representation of the current house now. Located in the Terwilliger Heights neighborhood in southwest Portland, the circa 1865 Kiernan House was moved from downtown Portland to its present location in 1964. The house was in the path of the “new” Stadium Freeway (I-405) construction and so it was slated for demolition.  For $350, James and Ruth Powers purchased the building and found a location to move the building, which is where the building remains. At the time, the location James and Ruth Powers found was a site used by the city to dump dirt while digging a nearby reservoir.

  

--> Download the Kiernan House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Laurelhurst Historic District, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 18, 2019
The Laurelhurst Historic District encompasses approximately 392 acres and is generally bounded on the north by NE Multnomah and NE Senate streets; the east by NE 44th Avenue and SE 44th Avenue; on the south by SE Stark Street; and on the west by SE 32nd Avenue and NE 33rd Avenue. The Laurelhurst Historic District is significant as Portland's only residential subdivision that captures the planning principles of the “City Beautiful” era and is notable for its examples of early 20th century American domestic architecture. The architecture in Laurelhurst includes styles such as Minimal Traditional cottages, WWII-era cottages, and early Ranch designs of the 1930s and 1940s. The “City Beautiful” era was an American planning movement during the 1890s and 1920s that emerged from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The movement attempted to design places that visually encouraged civic pride and engagement in the urban landscape through architecture. Advocates hoped that the design of beautiful places could increase the quality of life.
Laurelhurst also represents an example of a cohesive development by Paul C. Murphy, a notable “community builder” who designed, installed infrastructure and amenities, and determined the main stylistic character of a development.

 

 

--> Download the Laurelhurst Historic District nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Central Oregon Canal Historic District - Ward Road to Gosney Road Segment, Deschutes County, Unincorporated, Listed March 18, 2019
The Central Oregon Canal Historic District represents a portion of the Central Oregon Canal, which, along with the Pilot Butte Canal, forms the backbone of the Central Oregon Project, which provided irrigation to tens of thousands of acres of arid and semi-arid lands, transforming the desert into highly-productive agricultural land. Construction on the Central Oregon Canal began in 1904, reached the now-listed segment in 1905, and was completed to near the Crooked River in late 1911. The Central Oregon Canal Historic District comprises approximately 3.4 miles of the 47-mile long Central Oregon Canal, bounded by Ward Road on the west and Gosney Road on the east.
In addition to its significance to the history of agriculture in Oregon, the Central Oregon Canal Historic District is also historically significant for its demonstration of the extreme and varied efforts required to overcome the challenging volcanic terrain within a short period of time to satisfy contract obligations and successfully deliver irrigation to the lands beyond it, making possible the settlement and development of areas downstream.
 
--> Download the Central Oregon Canal Historic District nomination [pdf]
 
--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]
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Daniel C. & Katie A. McDonald House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 6, 2019
The Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House is a locally-notable example of a builder-designed Queen Anne-style house with unique architectural features. Daniel McDonald was a carpenter and homebuilder in Portland who constructed the home in two phases beginning in 1893. The extensive applied decoration of the Queen Anne style allowed for this eclectic approach to home improvement. The McDonald House exhibits characteristic elements from both the earlier and later periods of the Queen Anne style that reflect the two building phases, approximately ten years apart.
The McDonalds’ increased economic status after the turn-of-the-century provided the family the opportunity to expand and update their home after its original construction, including new embellishments and interior spaces that reflected their success.  While it was commonplace for homebuilders to use pattern books for residential construction in middle-class neighborhoods during this time, the McDonald House is not a stock design. Instead, it strongly reflects the adaptability of stock plans, and how the increasing availability of building components and decorative millwork through local building suppliers could be used to create unique homes.

 

--> Download the Daniel C. and Katie A. McDonald House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]


 
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Charles O. & Carie C. Blakely House, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 6, 2019

The Blakely House is locally notable as a distinctive and well-preserved example of Queen Anne architecture in an unusual “butterfly” arrangement, featuring a centered entrance with two symmetrical wings on either side that project toward each street on this corner home. The design is well-suited for corner lots, presenting a “front” to both streets. Decorative Stick style elements include vertical and horizontal trim boards and decorative panels surrounding the windows and doors. The Blakely house was built c. 1893 and is a notable example of the architecture of Portland’s growing streetcar suburbs in the 1890s. The property is named for its first residents, Charles O. and Carrie C. Blakely, who raised their family at the house between 1893 and 1909.


--> Download the Charles O. and Carie C. Blakely House nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]

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Charles O. Sigglin Flats, Multnomah County, Portland, Listed March 7, 2019
Designed by architect Emil Schacht and built for real estate investor Charles O. Sigglin in 1908, the Sigglin Flats is notable as one of the best examples of the fourplex building type in the Craftsman Style in the Buckman neighborhood area. Schacht is one of the most influential local architects whose designs introduced Portland to the emerging Craftsman style. The Sigglin Flats shows Schacht’s ability to add Shingle and Colonial Revival style elements to the Craftsman building, and his use of his own signature design elements that makes his buildings unique and identifiable. Smaller than traditional apartment buildings, the duplex and fourplex types were designed to blend in with their neighboring single-family residences. Population growth and streetcar development spurred the growth of residential neighborhoods in the area, prompting landlords and developers to invest in revenue-generating multi-family buildings like the Sigglin Flats.  


--> Download the Charles O. Sigglin Flats nomination [pdf]

--> View the record in the Historic Sites Database [link]