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Vision Problem Statement

Oregon’s water infrastructure has served us well, but is showing its age. We have underinvested in natural and built infrastructure to meet current challenges and have not adapted systems to meet the needs of a vibrant Oregon for the next 100 years.

Why Invest in Infrastructure?

Without modern water supply systems and water conservation approaches that combine to provide reliable access to water, including in emergencies...

...Oregonians risk not having water available when it’s needed for healthy people and communities, food production, tribal treaty rights, and a thriving economy.

Without coordinated built and natural water infrastructure investments...

...Oregonians – including Oregon’s federally recognized tribes and those in disproportionately impacted and rural communities – may be unable to access adequate clean water and return it to our rivers for downstream users, fish, and wildlife.

Without resilient built and natural infrastructure that provides cool and clean water across all Oregon watersheds...

...our people – and our fish and wildlife – are increasingly vulnerable to the health risks associated with lack of access to adequate, clean water.

Without strong capacity across all Oregon communities to plan for their water future, and effective ways to ensure strategic water investment decisions are coordinated across and between local, regional, state, and tribal and federal agencies...

...communities will not be prepared to take advantage of large-scale water infrastructure funding opportunities or collaborative and innovative partnerships.

Without upgraded levees, dams, stormwater systems, tide gates, and the natural protection of wetlands and estuaries...

...our communities will be less safe and at increased risk of damage and economic hardship from localized and catastrophic flooding.

Without access to relevant water data for effective decision-making, cross-agency coordination, and intentional approaches to test new ideas...

...built and natural water systems will perennially fall short of providing for Oregon’s in-stream and out-of-stream water needs, including tribal treaty obligations.

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