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Oregon Coronavirus Information & Resources For Business

The Office of Small Business Assistance is part of the Oregon Secretary of State’s Corporation Division. If you are looking for the US Small Business Administration, find them at http://www.sba.gov.

There are many resources available, and local resources may differ from those offered by the state or federal government. For information about a specific program, it’s best to contact the provider of that resource directly. Reaching resources by phone at this time might be difficult. Refer to websites and email questions whenever possible.

Current Guidance

Conditions in Oregon are changing rapidly with the spread of the Delta variant, and recommendations for protecting your health and those of others will continue to adapt. Currently, masks are required in indoor public settings, regardless of vaccination status. Visit coronavirus.oregon.gov​ to keep updated on the latest statewide guidance.

For the latest information on OSHA’s recommendations for workplaces, see OSHA’s COVID page. For information on vaccination rates, reopening requirements, masks and distancing recommendations, daily and weekly reports on COVID in Oregon, and COVID data by county, see the Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 page

For the latest communications from the Governor on Oregon’s response to COVID, visit coronavirus.oregon.gov.

Business Oregon’s Small Business Navigator​ connects you to a range of resources for financial and management support through the challenges of the pandemic and wildfires. Your county government website will have more information specific to your county.

Financial Help

The most common source of funding comes in the form of loans. Information about loans and disaster assistance through the US Small Business Administration is available at www.sba.gov/funding-programs. Some SBA Disaster loans are forgivable and don’t need to be paid back if used for specific purposes and meet strict guidelines set by the SBA. Check with the SBA or a Small Business Development Center to get more details about forgivable loans.

Additional financial resources for businesses can be found at Business Oregon, which is Oregon’s economic development agency. Check their Small Business Navigator​ for more information.

The Department of Human Services offers programs to assist those in need through:

The Oregon Health Authority offers the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program​.

Oregon’s 211 Info​ provides information and connections to essential community services including utility assistance, housing and shelter, food, and healthcare. 211 Info can also be accessed by dialing 211 on your phone.

​Get the latest infor​mation on resources for workers and business on the Governor's website​.

Maybe. Grants are generally more competitive and have very specific requirements. Since they are awarded by a variety of non-profits, for-profit businesses, and city or county government entities, our office cannot tell you where, when, and from whom grants might be available. No single site lists all available small business grants. 

Businesses seeking grants rather than loans should check with their county and city government, Business Oregon, the US Small Business Administration, and the local Chamber of Commerce to find out if grants are available. Your nearest Small Business Development Center​ may be able to help you identify possible grant sources and assist with applications for grants and for SBA loans.
Yes. The Small Business Development Centers are found throughout Oregon, and they offer free business advice. Find your nearest SBDC at https://oregonsbdc.org/​

Anyone can file for unemployment. Even if you're self-employed, you can file a claim, and the Employment Department will determine whether your claim is valid.

Unemployment Insurance is funded by Unemployment Insurance taxes paid by employers. Business owners who have not elected to pay Unemployment Insurance taxes on themselves over the past two years are not likely to have a valid unemployment claim. However, unemployment benefit requirements are constantly changing, and during the pandemic the Employment Department has modified many of their rules to broaden eligibility for unemployment. 

Programs enacted by the federal government in 2020 are in effect through September 4, 2021. Learn how to file for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance at unemployment.oregon.gov, and contact the Employment Department at https://oedcontactus.oregon.gov/hc/en-us/requests/new​.

Agency offices have been deluged with calls for assistance during the pandemic, and response times for email inquiries may be slower than usual because of the volume of inquiries. We understand that this is frustrating, so many agencies are making special efforts to keep online resources updated and to direct customers to online resources. Please consult agency websites first, and consider submitting questions by email rather than calling, as it may help you get an answer more quickly.

Help for Employers

Business Oregon is the state's economic development agency. Their website has helpful information about business resources, including alternative lenders, referrals to business advisors, and staff dedicated to helping and supporting Oregon businesses. 

The US Small Business Administration has a district office in Portland that can help you find information about recovery financing, COVID relief programs, business and community grants, and more.

Oregon’s Bureau of Labor and Industries offers technical support for employers in understanding and complying with employment and civil rights laws, including customized onsite trainings and an assistance hotline that responds to email and phone inquiries.

Oregon’s OSHA provides workplace guidance for safety issues, including resources for addressing COVID-19. 

Oregon Health Authority provides the latest information on current public health challenges and resources for accessing healthcare and healthcare insurance. 

Worksource Oregon​ offers assistance with all phases of hiring, including publicizing positions, staging hiring events, and developing strategies for retaining talented employees.

Worksource Oregon offers assistance with all phases of hiring, including publicizing positions, staging hiring events, and developing strategies for retaining talented employees. 

The Preferred Worker Program helps employers save money by hiring qualified workers who have permanent restrictions from job-related injuries. Possible help includes exemption from workers’ compensation premiums, reimbursement for claim costs, subsidizing part of the employee’s wages, or assistance with employment purchases. 

The Work Opportunity Tax Credit incentivizes hiring of individuals who face barriers to employment, including veterans or the long-term unemployed. Tax credits range from $1,500 to $9,600 per hire.

The Vocational Rehabilitation program​ works with employers and employees to find jobs for qualified, pre-screened and ready-to-work applicants with disabilities.
Oregon’s Bureau of Labor and Industries offers technical support for employers in understanding and complying with employment and civil rights laws, including customized onsite trainings and an assistance hotline that responds to email and phone inquiries.

Oregon’s OSHA​ provides workplace guidance for safety issues, including resources for addressing COVID-19.

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