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Chestnut blight regulations
Introduction
Chestnut blight (CB) or chestnut bark disease is caused the fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica. This introduced fungus has caused the decimation of the America chestnut, Castanea dentate, in its native range. C. parasitica also infests other chestnut (Castanea spp.), oak (Quercus spp.), maple (Acer spp.), staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina), shagbark hickory (Carya ovata), Italian alder (Alnus cordata), and apple (Malus domestica). The fungus, entering through wounds in the bark, grows into the cambium causing cankers. Girdling occurs, killing stems and sometimes the tree itself. Symptom severity depends on host species. The fungus is spread by infected nursery stock, as well as by wind, rain, birds, insects, and small mammals.

Cryphonectria parasitica
, native to Asia, was first reported on American chestnut in 1904 in New York City. By 1940, only 4 decades later, the America chestnut had come close to extinction in its native range. CB is now known to occur in the Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America.
 

Regulations
As early as 1937, Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) had established quarantine against chestnut blight. Currently, the quarantine, listed under Oregon Administrative Rule 603-052-0075, includes C. parasitica as well as the following insect pests; large chestnut weevil (Curculio caryatrypes), small chestnut weevil (Curculio sayi), nut curculio (Conotrachelus spp.), and oriental chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus).
All states and districts of the United States are included in the areas under quarantine. Commodities covered include all trees, plants, cuttings, scions, tissue cultures, and nuts in shell of all species and varieties of chestnut (Castanea spp.) and chinquapin (Castanopsis spp.).
Provisions of the Quarantine:
  • All states and districts east of and including Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, and Wyoming, no chestnut (Castanea spp.) or chinquapin (Castanopsis spp.) trees, plants, cuttings, scions, tissue cultures, and nuts in shell may be shipped into Oregon except by special quarantine exemption by the director of the ODA as provided in OAR 603-052-0020.
  • All states west of Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, and Wyoming, trees, plants, cuttings, scions, tissue cultures, and nuts in shell of chestnut and chinquapin may be shipped into Oregon provided that each shipment is accompanied by a certificate bearing the original signature of an authorized agricultural official affirming the plant material has been inspected and found free from chestnut blight, that the plant material has been grown in the shipping state for at least two years and that chestnut blight disease, large chestnut weevil, small chestnut weevil, nut curculio, Conotrachelus spp., and oriental chestnut gall wasp are not known to occur in the production area.
 

Quarantine exemptions documents and certificates shall be sent to the ODA, c/o Administrator, Plant Division, 635 Capitol Street, N.E., Salem, OR 97310, ten days prior to shipment of stock; any and all varieties and species of the chestnut and chinquapin trees, (Castanea spp. and Castanopsis spp.), tissue cultures, parts or the nuts thereof arriving in the state of Oregon without proper documentation will be immediately sent out of the state or destroyed at the option and expense of the owner or his or their responsible agent. No restrictions are placed by this quarantine upon the nuts of all species and varieties of chestnut and chinquapin grown in and imported from foreign countries when reshipped into or arriving in this state in the unopened original container.