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House Bill 2673

Name and Sex Designation Changes on a Birth Certificate

Starting January 1, 2018, people who were born in Oregon and who need to change their name or sex on their birth certificate to reflect their gender identity may do so by completing a notarized application rather than having to get a court order.

Status update: As of 4pm on 4/30/2018, four months after going into effect, the Center for Health Statistics has processed 161 notarized OHA 2673 applications.

This page provides more information on the new law and guidance for the new administrative process.

Watch our YouTube video for a brief summary of the law and process.


Frequently Asked Questions


What does HB 2673 do?

Effective January 1st, 2018, an individual’s attestation will be accepted to change the name and/or sex designation on an Oregon birth certificate if the change is requested to support the registrant’s gender identity and the gender of the individual does not match the sex reported on their birth certificate. Previously, this required a court order.


When does HB 2673 go into effect?

HB 2673 becomes effective January 1st, 2018. Applications and instructions will be available before this date but we can only accept forms signed and dated on or after January 1, 2018. Forms signed prior to HB 2673 becoming effective will not be accepted. Please note that even though HB 2673 becomes effective on January 1st, the state vital records office is closed on January 1st for the holiday.


Who is eligible to change their name and/or sex with HB 2673?

Anyone who was born in Oregon and who needs to change their name or sex designation on their birth certificate to reflect their gender identity is eligible. Individuals who previously changed their name but have not changed their sex will be eligible to change their sex designation on their birth record under the new law.

You have to be 18 years or older, or an emancipated minor, to change your own birth certificate. If you are a minor, your parent or legal guardian may request the change. Legal representatives of the person on the record, a parent, or a legal guardian may request the change with documentation of their authorization to act on behalf of the applicant.


What do I need to do to change my name and/or sex designation using this administrative process?

You need to:

You can come to our office or submit your application by mail.

Our office is located at 800 NE Oregon Street, Suite 225, Portland, OR, 97232. Our hours are 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday, excluding state holidays.

Our mailing address is:

Oregon Vital Records
PO Box 14050
Portland, OR 97293-0050

If you are completing this process by mail you will also need an order form and a photocopy of your ID.

Prior to submitting your request, we recommend reviewing your current birth certificate. This is important because the “full name as it appears on the birth record” is required on the application and must match your current birth record exactly.

If you need to order your Oregon birth record, please see www.healthoregon.org/chs for more information. We can replace one certified copy of a birth record without charge for up to one year from the date that it was issued after an amendment, so this should not be an additional cost if a certified copy is needed with the new name and/or sex. You would simply return the birth record with your application and amendment fee, and we would issue your updated record without charging you again for the certificate fee.


How much does this process cost?

Amending the record requires a $35 amendment fee. This does not include the cost of a birth certificate. Birth certificates cost $25 each for a short form certificate and $30 each for a long form certificate. If you order in the office, there is an additional $3 fee to complete the identity authentication quiz that our kiosks use to help verify your identity. If you need the process expedited, there is an optional expedite fee of $30.


How long does it take before I receive a new birth certificate?

After we receive a completed Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity, order form, ID, fees, and any other necessary documents, the birth record will typically be amended within seven to ten working days. An expedite option is available for an additional $30 which would expedite the processing time to three business days. We are unable to offer same-day corrections.


Where is your office located? What are your hours?

Our office​ is located at 800 NE Oregon Street, Suite 225, Portland, OR, 97232. Our hours are 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday, excluding state holidays.


What documentation will I receive as proof of the change?

Upon approval of your request to make an administrative change of name and/or sex to support gender identity, the applicant will receive documentation that includes: a new certified copy of the record of live birth for the registrant (if ordered), a copy of the application form requesting the change, and correspondence from the State Registrar on the final decision.


What information do I need to put on the Oregon Birth Record order form?

This form needs to be completed and the fees paid so you can get a certified copy of the new birth certificate. The birth record order form must include the information on your birth certificate prior to the name or sex designation change. We need the information to find your current birth certificate so we can change it. You can find the order form at www.healthoregon.org/chs.

After the changes are completed, any future orders for your birth certificate must include the new name and/or sex designation.


Will other agencies accept this new birth record?

This is a new process and we are unsure if other agencies, such as a federal Passport Agency, will accept these amended certificates to change information already on file with the agency. For records with an amended sex designation, nothing on the certificate will indicate an amendment occurred. This will make it difficult to connect the current record with any previous name on documentation at other agencies. In some cases, agencies might require a court order to recognize the new name and/or sex. We will work with applicants that ask us to explain the process to another agency, but we do not control the rules or procedures of other agencies and cannot speak for them. If you do not have an existing file with an agency (such as never before having a passport), there should be no reason for the agency to question the record.


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Who can request these changes (who is the applicant)?

Who can be the applicant depends on the registrant’s (person whose birth is the subject of the record) age. A change of name or sex designation for gender identity purposes may be requested by:

  • The registrant, if the registrant is age 18 or older or an emancipated minor (certified court documentation of emancipation is required); or
  • If the registrant is less than 18 years of age:
    • A parent on the birth record; or
    • The registrant’s legal guardian (certified court documentation required); or
  • A legal representative of one of the above (with documentation of authorization to act).

Where can I find the application I need to change my name and/or sex designation?

The Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity (PDF) is available now, which includes an attestation to make the change under HB 2673. It is also available in person at the Oregon Vital Records Amendments Office, 800 NE Oregon St., Suite 225, Portland, OR 97232 from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday. Applications should be filled out clearly and accurately, as they will become an important document in establishing your identity. Alterations to the form will make the form invalid. The application must be notarized.


What is an attestation?

An attestation is a formal declaration or witness to a fact. The official application includes an attestation for changing name and/or sex under HB 2673. The form is titled Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity (PDF). The form must be signed with a Notary Public present. Applications should be filled out clearly and accurately. Making a false statement on a vital record application is a Class C felony under ORS 432.993 and could result in imprisonment up to five years.


Can I sign or turn in my Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity prior to January 1st, 2018?

No. Signing or submitting the application prior to January 1st, 2018 will result in the application being rejected.


Does the Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity need to be notarized?

Yes, the application must be signed with a Notary Public present. Do not sign the application until you are in the presence of the Notary Public and he or she directs you to do so.


How do I submit my Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity?

The application may be submitted in person at the Oregon Vital Records office in Portland. It may also be submitted by mail to:

Oregon Vital Records
PO Box 14050
Portland, OR 97293-0050

If you are submitting your request by mail be sure that you have included the notarized Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity (PDF), an order form or the certified copy to be replaced, fees for the amendment​ and any new certificates you ​are ordering, a photocopy of your ID, and any other necessary documents to show you are eligible to request the change. See www.healthoregon.org/chs for information on ordering your birth certificate.


Can this be done through the mail?

Yes. A completed Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity, order form, fees, photocopy of your ID, and any other necessary documents to establish your eligibility to amend the record should be mailed to:

Oregon Vital Records
PO Box 14050
Portland, OR 97293-0050

Is there a way to expedite the process?

An expedite option is available for when a record is needed sooner than the normal timeline. The fee is an additional $30 and the document would be ready within three business days. We are unable to offer same-day corrections.


Where can I find a Notary Public?

A Notary Public can be found in many places of business. Often banks, insurance companies, and shipping or document preparation companies will have a Notary Public. A Notary Public is available to notarize applications or other vital records documents at our office free of charge. We cannot notarize documents other than our own vital records forms.


What identification do I need to bring?

You will need a current photo ID issued by a government organization in your current legal name. For example a driver’s license, ID card issued by the DMV, learner’s permit, provisional driver’s license, Passport, Military ID card, Tribal ID card, or other government documents that contain your photograph and signature.


What if I don’t have an ID in my current legal name?

If the name on your identification differs from your legal name or the name on your birth record, please bring an original certified record of the document that changed your name. For example, a certified court ordered name change, marriage record, or divorce record.


What if I don’t have appropriate documentation?

If you are unable to sufficiently prove your eligibility to amend or order the record, or otherwise lack appropriate documentation, we may not be able to approve your request to change name or sex administratively. In this case, you would receive correspondence explaining why your application cannot be processed. Changing your name and/or sex through a court order would still be possible.


Can I walk into the vital records office in Portland to request my birth record be changed or do I need an appointment?

No appointment is necessary. However, we are not able to complete amendments on the same day.


Do I need to order my birth record before I submit my Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity?

It is not required for you to order your birth record prior to submitting your application. However, we strongly recommend that you order your current birth record before submitting the application. This is because the “full name as it appears on the birth record” that is entered on the application must match your current birth record exactly. We can replace one certified copy of a birth record without charge for up to one year from the date that it was issued after an amendment, so this should not be an additional cost if a certified copy is needed with the new name and/or sex. You would simply return the birth record with your application and amendment fee, and we would issue your updated record without charging you again for the certificate fee.


Who can I contact if I have questions about this process?

For questions regarding this process, please contact Ryan Sanders at CHS.Amendments@state.or.us or by phone at 971-673-1178.


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Will other agencies accept this new birth record?

This is a new process and we are unsure if other agencies, such as a federal Passport Agency, will accept these amended certificates to change information already on file with the agency. For records with an amended sex designation, nothing on the certificate will indicate an amendment occurred. This will make it difficult to connect the current record with any previous name on documentation at other agencies. In some cases, agencies might require a court order to recognize the new name and/or sex. We will work with applicants that ask us to explain the process to another agency, but we do not control the rules or procedures of other agencies and cannot speak for them. If you do not have an existing file with an agency (such as never before having a passport), there should be no reason for the agency to question the record.


I’ve previously changed my name or sex through a court order. Can I still use this process?

Yes. The administrative option to change your name and/or sex is available to those who have previously changed their name or sex, even if it was through a court order, if the sex currently on your birth certificate does not match your gender identity.


Can I change my name and/or sex more than once through this administrative process?

No. Changing your name and/or sex through the administrative route authorized by HB 2673 can only be done once. Any subsequent changes to name and/or sex would require a court order.


Do I have to change both my name and my sex at the same time?

No. The name and sex can each be changed only once through this administrative process, but they do not need to be changed at the same time.


Can I still change my name and sex through a court order?

Yes. Name and sex can still be changed through a court order. In some cases a person may opt to change their name and/or sex through a court order rather than using this administrative process to facilitate acceptance by agencies that may not recognize the change.


If I change my name through this administrative process will there be a reference to my old name on the birth record?

If only the name is changed through this administrative process there will be a footnote, but the previous name will not be included. For example, if your original name was John Doe the name “John Doe” would not be referenced in the footnote. The footnote would be similar to the following: “Child’s name changed administratively, J.A. Woodward, State Reg., vg, 1/6/18.”


If I change my sex designation or my name and sex designation through this administrative process will there be a reference to my previous sex on the birth record?

If sex, or name and sex, are changed through this administrative process there will be no footnote. Like all records that are changed, there may be filing numbers added that are used internally, but the previous name and sex will not appear anywhere on the birth record.


Can a minor change their name and/or sex designation through this administrative process?

A minor can only change their own name and/or sex designation through this process if they have been legally emancipated through a court of competent jurisdiction. A minor’s name and/or sex designation can be changed by:

  • a legal parent,
  • legal guardian with certified letters of guardianship issued by a court, or
  • the legal representative of a parent or legal guardian with a notarized statement from the parent or legal guardian stating that the legal representative is authorized to act for them in this matter.

Do both parents need to sign the application to change the name and/or sex designation of a minor?

No. If the name and/or sex designation of a child is being changed with an Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity, the law only requires one parent to sign the application. For more information, see ORS 432.235 (3)(a).


Can I update my name on my child’s birth record with the Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity?

No. HB 2673 only addresses changing the name and sex designation on one’s own birth record and does not address changes to other documents such as marriage records or the birth records of the applicant’s children. A court order may be required if these changes are needed.


Can I use the Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity to change the sex on my birth record to Non-binary?

Yes. The application can be used to change the sex designation on an applicant’s birth record to Male, Female, or X, with X indicating Non-binary.


Can I use the Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity to change my sex to something other than Male, Female, or Non-binary?

No. Vital records are limited to specific categories which are used with other data to generate statistics to analyz​e health trends, guide program planning, and direct policy development. X, indicating Non-binary, has been added to include those who are neither fully male nor female.


Can I change my record if I am no longer living in Oregon?

Yes. If you were born in Oregon but no longer reside here you may still update your birth record. This can be done by submitting the necessary documents in person at our Portland office or through the mail.


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What documentation will I receive as proof of the change?

Upon approval of your request to make an administrative change of name and/or sex designation to support gender identity, the applicant will receive documentation that includes: a new certified copy of the record of live birth for the registrant (if ordered), a copy of the application form requesting the change, and correspondence from the State Registrar on the final decision. If denied, the applicant will receive correspondence indicating the reason for denial.


What do I do if I’ve changed my name and/or sex designation through the administrative process authorized by HB 2673 and now need to make another change to the name and/or sex?

Subsequent changes to name and/or sex designation require a court order. You would likely need to consult legal counsel who can provide legal advice for your specific situation.


How do I update my information at the Social Security Office or DMV after my birth record is changed?

Each agency has their own unique requirements and procedures for updating information. FYou should contact the agency in question directly for specific instructions. In general, organizations will want to see a certified copy of the updated birth record.


Can I get an apostille of my new birth record?

Yes. Instructions for obtaining an apostille and additional information may be found at http://sos.oregon.gov/business/Pages/apostille.aspx.


Can I get an apostille of the Application to Change the Name and/or Sex on a Record of Live Birth to Support Gender Identity?

Probably not. An apostille is a document authorized by the Hague Convention of 1961 that confirms the signature and authenticity of a government document generally required for international use. The attestation/application likely will not qualify for an apostille. See http://sos.oregon.gov/business/Pages/apostille.aspx​ for more information about Apostille from the Oregon Secretary of State.


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