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Monitoring Grants

Overview

OWEB supports efforts for comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of restoration investments, which should include but not be limited to physical, chemical, and biological evaluation. A well-designed monitoring program will:

  • Determine whether restoration actions were designed and implemented properly.
  • Determine whether the project’s restoration objectives were met.
  • Provide new information on the restoration action and the ecosystem functions and processes that it was intended to affect.
  • Determine needed refinements to restoration actions.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic collection of information used to assess the current condition and trend of environmental or performance indicators. Monitoring can be as simple as returning to a restoration site to be sure a culvert is still functioning properly; it can be as complex as assessing multiple parameters in a watershed to determine how overall watershed processes and functions change over time.

Eligible Monitoring Types

Please see OWEB's Online Application Guidance for more eligibility details.

Description. Monitoring made at a regular interval to determine long-term patterns of a parameter(s),and to assess conditions relative to specific criteria. A component may involve collecting baseline data, if none exists.

Activities. These can include monitoring/surveys targeting habitat, stream, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biologicals, invasive species, soil, water quantity, and water quality.

Description. Monitors effectiveness of a restoration project(s) in meeting its biological and ecological objectives. A component may involve collecting baseline data to establish representative conditions before restoration is implemented.

Activities. These can include habitat surveys, stream surveys, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biological monitoring, invasive species, soil surveys, water quantity, and water quality.​

Description. Measures environmental parameters to determine the effectiveness of restoration actions in creating desired habitat condition change(s) at a large geographical scale.

Activities. These can include monitoring/surveys targeting habitat, stream, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biologicals, invasive species, soil, water quantity, and water quality.

Description.The collection, compilation, analysis, and interpretation of biological data to facilitate management decisions and actions for control and/or mitigation of impairment. Assessments are rapid, streamlined, scientifically valid procedures for biological surveys that allow multiple site investigations in a field season, and quick turn-around of results for management decisions. A rapid bio-assessment (RBA) is different than a Technical Assistance (TA) assessment and survey because it is usually conducted in a particular area, many times, whereas a TA assessment is often a one-time stand-alone activity. In addition, an RBA follows specific protocols and usually involves hiring qualified contractors to complete the survey. RBA projects can be thought of as a “quick and dirty” method of evaluating fish distribution and abundance. The survey method was designed to sub-sample a certain percent of pool habitats (usually 20%) using a technique that covers large distances. RBAs describe the current distribution of fish, as well as collecting pool metrics and variations in habitat complexity. The data collected can be used to prioritize habitat restoration strategies and measure progress of future restoration activities.

Activities. These can include monitoring/surveys targeting habitat, stream, vegetation, macroinvertebrates, juvenile fish, adult fish, other biologicals, invasive species, soil, water quantity, and water quality.

Applications are accepted in the Fall of each year and are submitted entirely through our online system. Deadlines will be posted once the Fall grant cycle opens.

  1. Obtain a login (username and password).
    If your organization already has an OGMS login, skip to step 2.
  2. An OGMS login is required to access the online grant application. Only one login per organization is allowed. If no login exists for an organization, please email Leilani Sullivan to request one. Include the following in your email:
    • Organization name and address
    • Grantee Contact Information: name, title, email address, and phone number for the person who will receive all communication from OWEB and sign any grant agreements.
    • Payee Contact Information: name, email address, and phone number for the person who keeps records and submits payment requests and documentation.
    • FEIN (Federal Employer Identification Number). OWEB may enter into agreements only with legally established entities. OWEB will review potential applicants prior to creating an OGMS login.
  3. Log in to the Online Application.
    Guidance to help you fill out the application is always available in the top navigation bar of the online application. An application template is also available after you log in and choose "Create a New Application."

Please contact your Project Manager with questions.

​After grant applications are submitted:

  1. ​OWEB staff check project eligibility in each application.
  2. Review Teams read applications and may visit proposed project sites. Review Teams meet to review applications based on criteria described in administrative rules. They recommend one of the following for each grant: a) Fund, b) Fund with conditions, c) Do not fund, or d) Defer. Review Teams prioritize projects recommended for funding based on:
    1. How well the project meets the criteria established in OARs 695-010-0030 and -0060,
    2. Certainty of project being completed successfully,
    3. Benefit to watershed function, habitat, and water quality, and
    4. Project costs relative to watershed benefits.
  3. OWEB staff summarize Review Team evaluations and recommend projects for funding to the board. OWEB staff post summarized evaluations and staff recommendations online.
  4. The OWEB board awards grants.

Resource

Water Quality Monitoring Guidebook

Contact

Ken Fetcho, Effectiveness Monitoring Specialist

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