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CMA Frequently Asked Questions


​A:  There is no one website or resource that provides CE classes specific to CMAs.  A variety of sources may be used.

Options would include taking a class from an approved medication aide training program, completing training offered by an employer, or attending a CE seminar that focuses on medication administration within the CMA role.  Distance learning options such as a web-based presentations may be acceptable if the content is presented by a nurse and relevant to the CMA role.
​A:  Only those on the list of authorized duties for the CMA.

Division 63 of the Nurse Practice Act specifies the routes and types of medications the CMA may and may not administer.  The authorized duties may not be expanded by a nurse.  The CMA is responsible to decline administration of medications not included in the authorized duties.
​A:  Possibly. 

The Division 63 authorized duties do allow the CMA to give medications via this route.  There is no specification on how long the tube has been in place before medications may be given by the CMA.  In all cases, the CMA would proceed only under nurse direction and if the needed skills are in place.  If the CMA has any doubt, the supervising nurse should be consulted.
​A:  No.

The Board does not set an age requirement for CNA or CMA certification.  Most training programs define age requirements for admission, however.
​A:  CMAs do not work in outpatient settings.

The title abbreviation CMA is protected by Oregon law and means certified medication aide, not certified medical assistant.  The abbreviation CMA cannot be used by medical assistants in Oregon.

Medical assistants are unregulated personnel and work in outpatient settings under the direction of the physician.  Medical assistants do often seek national certifications and those credentials are either CCMA or CMA (AAMA) to distinguish between the two national certification exams available to medical assistants.
​A:  This is an employment issue and is not regulated by the Board of Nursing.

Scheduling, hours of work, overtime policies, etc. are Human Resources issues.  Laws related to employment and standards for facility licensing are the best resources for questions in these areas.

If there is a situation where the work scheduling is being implemented by a licensed nurse and the result is unsafe client care, the individual nurse may be reported to the Board through the on-line complaint form.  The Board of Nursing investigates individual nurses to determine if there has been a violation of the Nurse Practice Act.  The Board of Nursing does not take complaints about or investigate facilities or departments within facilities.
​A:  No. This is not a requirement for renewal.

Requirements for training in cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and/or first aid are typically a requirement of practice setting policies, rules governing a setting/service, and/or a specific position description within an organization.
​A:  It varies.  For some settings, this may be regulated under the facility licensing.  The Board does not regulate facilities or their scheduling and staffing activities.

If there is a situation where the work scheduling is being implemented by a licensed nurse and the result is unsafe client care, the individual nurse may be reported to the Board through the on-line complaint form.  The Board of Nursing investigates individual nurses to determine if there has been a violation of the Nurse Practice Act.  The Board of Nursing does not take complaints about or investigate facilities or departments within facilities.
​A:  This is not addressed specifically in the Division 63 authorized duties.

The Board does not have a position statement related to pre-pouring medications.  The CMA needs to review any facility policies related to medication preparation that may address pre-pouring.  However, the CMA is expected to understand the safety concerns associated with removing medications from labeled containers and combining them with other medications for future administration.
​A:  Yes, when directed to do so by the nurse monitoring the resident's pain.

Administration of prn pain medications around-the-clock on a set schedule is sometimes a helpful pain management strategy.  The CMA needs to be provided clear direction by the nurse to administer medications on a specific schedule when they are ordered prn.  It is the nurse's responsibility to assess the client's overall pain management on an on-going basis.  For a client needing pain medications around-the-clock, the nurse should seek to have the medication order changed from prn to a set schedule to meet the client's need.
If you cannot find the information you need at one of the links above, access the OSBN interactive scope-of-practice decision guide (PDF version), the OSBN interpretive practice statements, or the Nurse Practice Act

The Board does not answer any practice questions by phone or questions sent to the general OSBN e-mailbox.  You may submit a written practice question to Board Staff.  However, if your question is answered in the FAQs or in a practice statement, you will be directed back to the website.  Please allow up to four weeks for a response to your inquiry.




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