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About the Board

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The Psychiatric Security Review Board was originally established in 1977 to supervise those individuals who successfully asserted the insanity defense to a criminal charge. Recognizing that individuals diagnosed with a persistent mental illness have different rehabilitative needs than convicted defendants, this State has invested in a robust mental health system specifically designed for this population. With public safety as its primary focus, the Board has an exceptional record of reintegrating clients into the community with a 6 year average 0.46% adult recidivism rate. In recent years, the Board's responsibilities have expanded to supervise youth and certain civil commitments who are placed under its supervision.
History
On January 1, 1978 the Board assumed jurisdiction over all persons found guilty except for insanity (GEI) who posed a substantial danger to others.
In 2007, the Legislature expanded the Board and its responsibilities to include a juvenile panel to oversee youth who were found responsible except for insanity (REI) of a crime.
The 2009 Legislature again expanded the Board’s duties by giving it the added responsibility of conducting hearings for individuals previously barred from purchasing or possessing a firearm due to a mental health determination who petition to have that right restored.
The 2013 Legislative session expanded the Board's role in granting relief by designating it as the authority to hold hearings for those persons who have successfully asserted the guilty except for insanity defense and wish relief from reporting as a sex offender or reclassification of their risk designation.  In addition, the Legislature provided Oregon courts the option of placing certain civilly committed individuals under the Board's jurisdiction for placement and supervision purposes.
Organization
The Board is now comprised of two separate panels: an Adult Panel and a Juvenile Panel. By statute, each panel consists of five members, each appointed by the Governor for four year terms and confirmed by the Senate.
The Adult Panel has a psychiatrist and a psychologist experienced in the criminal justice system, an experienced parole and probation officer, an experienced criminal practice attorney, and a member of the general public. The Juvenile Panel is similarly comprised but with a child psychiatrist, child psychologist, parole and probation officer experienced in the juvenile criminal justice system, an attorney experienced in juvenile criminal trial practice, and a member of the general public.
In addition, the agency currently employs 11 staff and has a biennial budget of approximately $3.2 million.
 

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