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Board FAQs

Psychiatric Security Review Board members serve four year terms, and are eligible to renew for up to one additional four year term.
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The governor submits names of potential Psychiatric Security Review Board members to the state senate. Appointments are official upon senate approval.​

According to Oregon Revised Statute 161.385, the Board's membership includes:

(a) A psychiatrist experienced in the criminal justice system and not otherwise employed on a full-time basis by the Oregon Health Authority or a community mental health program;

(b) A licensed psychologist experienced in the criminal justice system and not otherwise employed on a full-time basis by the authority or a community mental health program; 

(c) A member with substantial experience in the processes of parole and probation;

(d) A lawyer with substantial experience in criminal trial practice;

(e) A psychiatrist certified, or eligible to be certified, by the Oregon Medical Board in child psychiatry who is experienced in the juvenile justice system and not employed on a full-time basis by the authority or a community mental health program;

(f) A licensed psychologist who is experienced in child psychology and the juvenile justice system and not employed on a full-time basis by the authority or a community mental health program;

(g) A member with substantial experience in the processes of juvenile parole and probation;

(h) A lawyer with substantial experience in juvenile law practice;

Some restrictions apply to Board membership. For example, the Board's mental health professionals may not be employed full time by the Oregon Health Authority or a community mental health program, and the attorney members may not be active district attorneys, deputy district attorneys, or public defenders.




No. There is no minimum time a person must stay at the hospital nor do all GEI defendants have to go to the hospital.


The period that individual PSRB clients stay at OSH is based on a clinical assessment of the individual's mental status and progress in treatment at the hospital and a risk assessment as to their dangerousness as well as the availability of the appropriate resources in the community. If the Board determines that a person can be safely managed and treated in a community setting, the PSRB attempts to find an appropriate placement.​

State law prohibits the Board from putting anyone on Conditional Release who is determined to be presently dangerous to others. Additionally, individuals the Board places on conditional release go through a comprehensive screening process including four levels of review.​

Conditional release is not a new policy. Most states in the US have some type of conditional release program. The PSRB has supervised clients in the community on conditional release since its inception in 1978. Over the past 15 years, over 1500 conditional releases have been granted to individuals who have transitioned into community placements throughout the state of Oregon. Some of these clients remain under supervision for decades or even life. ​



By law, the district attorney from the committing county is notified, as well as the victim(s), if they requested such notification. Board staff also notifies the Attorney General's office, the client's attorney, and the client's proposed case manager. Once a person leaves the state hospital on a conditional release, the PSRB also notifies law enforcement. With some exceptions, Fair Housing and Disability Laws prevent the Board from sharing information about patients with neighbors or members of the public.​

Please visit our Administrative Meetings page for the dates ​​​​​of upcoming Board meetings.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

Traditionally, the Board holds hearings at either the PSRB Office in Portland or at the Oregon State Hospital. For more information, including driving and parking instructions for both locations, please visit our client hearings page​. ​Since March 2020, the Board has adjusted its hearing procedures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. For the time being, the Board is conducting all hearings remotely: via video or teleconference. ​​​​

The Governor appoints the Psychiatric Security Review Board's members, and they serve at her pleasure​​​





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