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Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule

The RRP Rule: Contractors and Painters

A  federal law called the Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule requires that individuals conducting renovation, repair and painting work in pre-1978 homes or child-occupied facilities be trained lead-safe, licensed or certified and follow specific lead-safe work practices.

On this page:


What is a contractor?

You are a contractor if you have a Construction Contractors Board (CCB) license or should have a CCB license. Examples of contractors include construction and renovation contractors, painters and other speciality trades.

You are not a contractor if you are an employee (maintenance professional) of a firm such as a school, child care facility or property management company.

If you are a contractor hired to permanently eliminate lead-based paint hazards (abatement) from a property, the RRP rule does not apply to you.


What is Renovation?

Renovation means modifying any existing structure that disturbs painted surfaces. Renovation includes:

  • restoring building surfaces
  • window repair or replacement
  • painting preparation
  • removal or replacement of walls, ceilings, plumbing and windows
  • weatherization projects
  • any activity that disturbs painted surfaces

Renovation does not include "minor repair and maintenance". "Minor repair and maintenance" means disturbing 6 square feet or less of painted interior surface per room or 20 square feet or less of painted exterior surface. HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule is more stringent. Please review the differences in this document from hud.gov (pdf) 


Contractor Resources

  • EPA's updated "Lead-Safe Certified Guide to Renovate Right" (English and en español) - this pamphlet was updated due to amendments to the RRP regulation effective October 4, 2011. Renovators must now begin providing the revised version. You may use the older version if you have printed stock remaining. Please be sure to include replacement page 10 which can be found on EPA's website.

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